Notes

[NI0003] Sharon Renee Swadener was the first born baby in Pacific County, Washington State in 1967, born January 3, 1967. Sharon weighing in at 8lbs and 9oz. Dr. Bussenbarger delivered.

On the day that Sharon was born her father was driving to the home of his mother and father-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Don McGuire. The following is copied from a newspaper article describing an accident that her father was involved in, literally within minutes of her birth.

Headline reads: Two Accidents Listed in City

Raymond-A rental trailer being returned to his home base in Raymond broke loose from its hitch and crashed into a park pickup truck on Henkel Street causing some damage to both vehicles. He accident happened at 4 PM Monday.

Driving the car: the U-Haul trailer was Tobey Prior Millican, 16. The park truck, a 1964 model International, is owned by Pete Karitis. Damage to the left rear of the truck was estimated at $180.

Three Car Crash

Three cars were involved in the chain reaction crash on the new South Fork highway bridge about 1 PM yesterday. In the first machine, stop behind a string of other cars at the stoplight, were Louis Fuller, City with his father, Bill Fuller, as a passenger. Next in line was Morris Swadener, Aberdeen. Driving a panel delivery truck, Kenneth Grimm, City, crashed into the rear of the Swadener machine which in turn struck the Fuller car.

Police Chief Dan Lunsford reported damage to all three cars was minor. However, the Fuller's complaint of back and at pains as did Swadener, while Grimm complained of a chest injury, according to the Chief, any advise those involved have a checkup by a physician. No citations had been issued in the incident up to the late afternoon as the investigation of the accident had not been completed.
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A Christmas Letter From Sharon:

Merry ChristmasDecember 2003

This is been a fairly quiet year with a few notable high points and bits of news.

Of course the greatest high point of our year was a birth of our son, Prescott. He was born at 10:27 a.m. on February 16th, which happens to be the birthday of Sharon's Grandma Hamilton (who passed away in 2000) and Sharon's cousin, Sean. Prescott weighed 8 lbs. 13 ounces, which is only nine ounces more than Renee weighed when she was born, but he has turned out to be as big as Renee was/is petite. At six months he weighed 20 pounds. Renee didn't weighed 20 pounds until she was over 14 months old.

Prescott is an incredibly happy baby most of the time. But he is an extreme child, meaning when he is not happy, he is really not happy! He'll play by himself for extended periods of time and loves to laugh at/with Renee when she does silly things. At 10 months he is been walking for a couple of weeks now, just a little ahead of when Renee walked. It is fun to see him get so excited when he's walking across the room, holding his arms out and shifting them, to help balance himself. He is also going up and down (mostly up) the stairs, waiting goodbye and playing "patty- cake". Prescott is an incredible joy to have and we feel very blessed to have him in our lives

Renee is two and a half years old and a real kick in the pants. She is an incredible helper with Prescott, loves to play "peek-a-boo" with him and making laugh, warns Mommy when Prescott is about to get in trouble, and generally helps out whenever she can, if she's in the mood! Just this month she took a trip to California with Grandma and Grandpa Marconi, Sharon's mom and step dad, when she went up in a plane, was in the sky, went to Disneyland and saw Mickey Mouse and Goofy. She went on the "monster coaster" (roller coaster), that was scary and the elephant ride, (Dumbo ride) that was fun. She had a great time visiting with Uncle Byron, and Reva, Jeanette and Jeffrey, and already talking about the next trip in an airplane and to Disneyland.

Renee has accomplished a lot this year. Grandma Marconi weaned her off the pacifier in February. This summer, with a little encouragement from her cousin, Corbin, Renee decided it was time to be potty-trained and within a week, she was done the diapers, except at nighttime. It has been made to step forward, one-step back process, but she is having good success at it. She has gone from only saying a few words to carrying on complete conversations, with or without anyone else. She loves to sing and "read" books. She loves to help Sharon in the kitchen, practicing her counting skills while they make breakfast or bake. Her most recent accomplishments is moving from a crib to a bed. She slept in a bed while in California and we decided to try it when she got home and it worked well. She is finally sleeping through the night most of the time. Yahoo!!

Sharon has become involved in a group called MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers). This fall she was asked to do the publicity for the group, which includes a newsletter each month. Sharon has been having lots of fun with the newsletter and really enjoys the companionship of other women with small children this group provides.

Early this year, through MOPS, Sharon and Renee made some new great friends. When Mirka and her son, Christopher, who is four months younger than Renee, started attending Mops, Sharon and Mirka discovered they live pretty close to each other, which is saying a lot if you know where we live! They get together a couple times, before and right after Prescott was born, but eventually they started doing a lot together. Mirka is from the Czech Republic and has never been to a garage sale; so Sharon got to introduce Mirka to this great activity. Mirka took to garage sale-ing quickly and within a very short time, they were planning their weeks around the Friday garage sales. Sharon hasn't had this much fun going to garage sales since her Grandma Maguire was alive.

Besides garage sales, Mirka and Sharon did a lot of things together over the summer, sometimes spending for 4 out of 5 days a week together. They took walks in the woods behind their houses, shopped together to the kids to a park or two and just hung out in Mirka's backyard. In the fall, Mirka started babysitting for Sharon's sister, Courtney, so they didn't see each other as much, but they didn't take the kids to a music appreciation class one day a week. Sharon has appreciated having a good friend living so close and likes being able to have long phone conversations with someone without having to worry about the phone bill! Doug likes that part too!

During this time Christopher and Renee have become fast friends. They have a love-hate relationship, almost like a brother/sister relationship. They can be hugging one minute and pushing the next. When they aren't together, they often talk about each other. Whenever we drive by the road to Mirka and Christopher's house, Renee gets excited and wants to stop and visit.

Doug is busy as usual with the business. We had our busiest September ever this year. As usual Doug crammed as much work into November and December as possible, as everybody wanted their jobs done before Thanksgiving or Christmas. Doug occasionally gets in a visit with his friend John, but besides a trip or two to Vancouver and two visits to Doug's brother, Don's house, Doug has been very busy most of the year.

Doug's parents made their annual visit in August and Doug's brother Dave, was able to come up in California for a visit. Renee and Grandpa Schwartz were the best buddies by the time they left for home. Grandpa even kept Renee home one day, while Grandma, Sharon and Prescott made a quick trip to town. We only wish they lived closer and could see the kids more often.

Well, that's our year in a nutshell. We hope this finds you doing well and we wish you a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and Happy New Year.

God bless and Take care,

Sharon, Doug, Renee and Prescot
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OHHS 1985

Sharon Swadener
Last Update: 6/28/2003

Status Located

Location

Email dugandshar@tscnet.comm

Personal Website


Business Website www.olytops.com

Photo Website


Birthday January 3, 1966

Spouse/Partner Doug Schwartz

Children: Renee (2001), Prescott (2003)

Employer: Self employed

Bio: I'm living in Belfair, Washington. I am married with two children, Renee and Prescott. My husband and I have our own business, Olympic Countertops. I visit family in Oak Harbor every couple of months. We built our house in 1997 and live on 10 acres. I stay busy taking care of the kids and helping with the business.

[NI0007] From records received from National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, Missouri

In a letter from a Archives Technician; "The military record needed to answer your inquiry was located in the area that suffered the most damage in the fire that occurred at this Center on July 12, 1973. Fortunately, a portion of the record was among those recovered; however, it was damaged in the fire."

Information contained in those records are copied below: Information copied from NA FORM 13038 (Rev. 04-01)

Certification of Military Service

This certifies that Morris G. Swadener, 06 547 758, was a member of the Regular Army from December 19, 1933 to December 18, 1939. Service was terminated by Honorable discharge. Last Grade, Rank, or Rating, Corporal. Active Service dates: Same as above. Date of birth: June 17, 1915. Place of Birth: Seattle, WA

(Certification) Given at St. Louis, Missouri on December 8, 2003

Certification of Military Service

This certifies that Morris G. Swadener, 06 547 758, was a member of the Regular Army from October 9, 1945 to February 17, 1947. Service was terminated by Honorable Discharge. Last Grade, Rank, or Rating: Staff Sergeant. Active Service dates: Same as above. Date of Birth: June 17, 1915. Place of Birth: Seattle, WA

(Certification) Given at St. Louis, Missouri on December 8, 2003

Missing are his military (Army) records from 1939 to 1945. VA does have records which have been requested.

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As told by Gloria June Swadener

All of Dad's brothers had children, except Dick, Whitney, and Betty

All of Dad's brothers served during World War II, except for Orville. When he was 13 he tried to enlist. The Navy finally let him enlist at 16 and he just missed the WWII action. Burton and Orville retired from the Navy. Dad was in the army for 17 years and was released on a medical discharge. I have a newspaper article about the Swadener boys during World War II. During WWII Grandpa (Alva Earl Swadener) and Grandma Swadener had the most sons (7), plus 2 sons-in-law, serving our country, in the State of Washington.

My father's family was, shall I say, "colorful". They grew up during the depression and more or less had to fend for themselves. Most of the boys were "guests" of (the) Green Hill Reform School. My Dad claims he was there for running away.

When my dad was 3-years old, he and his two older brothers hitchhiked from Seattle to Tacoma. When he was 6-years old, he and one loder brother hitchhiked from Seattle to Portland, Oregon. By the time he was 12-years old, he hitchhiked back to Pennsylvania to see his grandfather. Grandpa wanted him to go to school, so Dad decided it was time to move on. When he arrived back to the Seattle area, he was then put into Green Hill. Dad claims it was the best home he had. He finished his schooling and while in school learned to be a baker. At 18, he joined the Army and served 17 years in the Tank Corps. His highest rank was Master Sergant. Dad worked for American Airlines in Los Angles and retired after 30-years.
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Buried at Riverside National Cemetary, 909/653-8417, Secion 46A, Site 3916 on 11/15/99. The mortuary was Draper Mortuary
909/986-1131.

SWADENER, Morris "Gail"; 84; Ontario CA; Inland Valley D-B; 1999-11-14; glenn
SWADENER, Morris "Gail"; 84; Ontario CA; Inland Valley D-B; 1999-11-15; glenn

Inland Valley Daily Bulletin
2041 East 4th Street
Ontario, CA 91764
909-987-6397

ONTARIO -- Morris "Gail" Swadener, 84, of Ontario died Nov. 11, 1999, at home. He was born in Seattle and lived in Ontario three years.
He was a World War II Army veteran. Retired, he worked for American Airlines. Mr. Swadener is survived by seven children, Morris Gail Swadener Jr. of Belfair, Wash., Gloria Hall of Centralia, Wash., Anita, Lindasue K. and Mike Swadener, all of Ontario, Curtis Swadener of Victorville and Mary Veria of Hollywood, Fla.; a brother, Bob Swadener of Marysville, Wash.; two sisters, Barbara Hamre of Oakland and Betty Swadener of Snohomish, Wash. Memorial services will be at 10:30 a.m. today at Draper Memorial Chapel, Ontario. Graveside services will be at 12:15 p.m. today at Riverside National Cemetary. Draper Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.
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Riverside National Cemetery Riverside, Riverside County, California

* Records with an asterisk at the end indicates those that have not been verified by the U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs. Please visit "VA Cemetery Verification Project" for details on what this means.

Swadener, Morris G, b. 06/17/1915, d. 11/11/1999, US Army, SSGT, Res: Ontario, CA, Plot: 46A 0 3916, bur. 11/15/1999

SWADENER, MORRIS G
SSGT US ARMY
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 10/09/1945 - 02/17/1947
DATE OF BIRTH: 06/17/1915
DATE OF DEATH: 11/11/1999
DATE OF INTERMENT: 11/15/1999
BURIED AT: SECTION 46A SITE 3916
RIVERSIDE NATIONAL CEMETERY
22495 VAN BUREN BOULEVARD
RIVERSIDE , CA 92518
(909) 653-8417

[NI0008] Obituaries from the Sunday, September 17, 2000 edition of the Aberdeen World

Leora E. Hamilton - September 13, 2000

RAYMOND - Leora E. Hamilton, a 60-year resident of Raymond, died Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2000 after battling a long illness. She was 80.

She was born, Feb. 16, 1920 at the family homestead on Bunker Creek in Lewis County to Erik Hjalmer Peterson and Ethel Viola Kitchel. The family moved to Raymond in the early 1940s.

She later married Lawrence Hamilton. He died in 1980.

During her life she owned and operated several popular restaurants and cafes, including the Hamburger Stand.

She is survived by two sons, Morris Gail Swadener Jr. of Kingston and Douglas Lawrence Hamilton of Raymond; two daughters, Gloria June Swadener-Hall of Chehalis and Patricia JoAnn Hamilton of Lebam; two sisters, Grace Lucille Peterson-Johnson of Kenai, Alaska and Helen Carol Peterson-Flemetis of Raymond; eight grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

A brother, Orville Erik Peterson, died before her in 1988.

A funeral service is set for 11 a.m., Monday, Sept. 18, at the Stoller's Mortuary, 315 5th St. in Raymond. Interment will follow at the family plot at the Claquato Cemetery west of Chehalis at 1 p.m.

Arrangements are by Lewis Funeral Chapel at Bremerton.
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Memorial Services Held at Stoller's Mortuary
Monday, September 18, 2000 10:00AM
Rev. Jim Taylor - Bapist Minister

Leora Ethel Hamilton
17 September 2000

Welcome: We are gathered together to honor the memory of Leora Hamilton who has left us to be with our Lord.

Prayer:

John 14: 1-6 & 25-28 Let not your heart be troubled-------

John 11: 25, 26 I am the resurrection and the life---

Song by Douglas : ""

Obituary:

Memories:

Song: "The Old Rugged Cross"

I Thes 4:13-18 I would not have you to be ignorant -----

I Cor 15: 51-55 Behold I show you a mystery------

II Cor 5:8 Absent from the body - present with the Lord.

Rev 21: 4 God will wipe away all tears--

Committal prayer: Comfort --- last good bye --- heal any hurts --- ashes to ashes Dust to dust

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By Morris 'Butch' Swadener - Aug 27, 2000

Thursday, August 24, 2000. After an examination by Dr. Kang at the nursing home Grandma (Leora) Hamilton was transported to the hospital just across the street. Dr. Kang ordered two pints of whole blood, a battery of blood tests, and a cat scan.

The blood transfusion improved her overall physical health. However, in a phone conversation with Dr. Kang the results of the blood tests and the cat scan revealed the worst possible news.

Grandma Hamilton’s cancer has spread to her stomach, the stomach lining, the upper section of her intestines, the lining of the sack that holds the intestines, and into her lymphoid glands. This is a fast growing cancer that is untreatable. According to Dr. Kang, due to her weakened condition, surgery is out of the question, nor is any further chemotherapy a possibility.

For the immediate future she will remain in the nursing home. Dr. Kang will maintain a close watch over her health during the next few weeks. It is his intention that she be made as comfortable and pain free as possible. He stated that there is little that can be done to treat the cancer because of its rapid growth and her weakened condition. He provided no time frame.

Grandma Hamilton is fully aware of her condition. She understands the nature of her cancer and the final results. Understandably she is depressed.

Her phone is next to her bed (360-753-3333). She is able to reach the phone. Her best time seems to be between 10:00 AM and 1:00 PM. Because of her stomach pain, the medication has a sedating effect on her and it is often difficult for her to carry on a conversation. However, she does appreciate those who have taken the time to call her.

Grandma also enjoys the visits from family and friends. While she may not always be able to fully participate in a conversation, she enjoys hearing about “pleasant” family news.

She likes flowers, in particular, MUMS.

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Copied from original court documents.

In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for Pacific County

Morris G. Swadener, plaintiff

Vs.

Leora E. Swadener, defendant

No. 10359 INTERLOCUTORY ORDER

The above entitled matter having been brought on regularly for hearing before the above named court, plaintiff appearing by his attorney John J. LANGENBACH and the defendant appearing in person and with her attorney of record Fred M. Bond, and it appearing to the court that said plaintiff having withdrawn his complaint in said cause and the matter having come to trial on the cross-complaint of the defendant, and the testimony having been taken, and court having made findings of fact and conclusion of law.

NOW THEREFORE IT IS ORDERED that the complaint of said plaintiff's be and the same is hereby dismissed. That said defendant is entitled to an absolute divorce from the plaintiff on the grounds of cruelty. That this interlock story order shall not be considered or construed to have the effect of dissolving the marriage of the parties to this action, or granting a divorce. After the expiration of six months from the date thereof, either of the parties hereto upon making proper application by motion or petition to the court, may have made and entered a final decree of absolute divorce dissolving the marriage. Until such final decree shall have been duly made and entered, the marriage of the parties hereto is not dissolve and they remained husband and wife.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the care, custody and control of the two children Morris G. Swadener Jr. age for years and Gloria June age three years and each of them be awarded to the dependent with the right of said plaintiff to visit said children providing he demeans himself properly and until the further order of the court.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the plaintiff be required to pay to the dependent the sum of $25 per month for each of said children and support to begin with the six day of September 1946 children are not to be removed from Pacific County.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that all the household goods and the United States bonds, the same being all the property of said parties be and the same is hereby awarded to the dependent to be her soul as separate property free and clear of any claim on the part of the plaintiff.

DONE in open court to six day of September 1946.

John J. O'Phelan/Judge

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Copied from Adna High School All Class Reunion - 1992

Leora Ethel Peterson-HamiltonClass of 1938

Prophecy:100th Dance Studio Opened

Montpelier, Vermont was a scene of adna gala celebration at the opening of the 100th Peterson Dance Studio. Leora Peterson, famed ballroom dancer now has studios in every state of the union; and ambition she acquired Terpsichorian club at Adna High School.

Leora became engaged to a handsome soldier during her senior year and was married in August, 1938. They lived in Seattle and Tacoma for the first two years, then moved to Salinas and San Jose, California for five months. Next it was Columbus, Georgia for one and one half years then on to Shreveport, Louisiana where their oldest son was born. In December, right after the war was declared, they go back to Washington to visit Leora's parents in Onalaska. They lived in Louisiana for 18 months.

In 1943, Leora's father was in poor health, living into Raymond so she came back to take care of him. A daughter was born during this visit. She returned to be with her husband was then stationed at Palm Springs, California. After two months, Leora decided that 110 degrees in the shade and no shade was too much. She returned the cool climate of Raymond. When her husband was transferred to Columbus, Georgia she took her son and joined him never three months. Leora came to a decision that the contents of a suitcase are an adequate for raising two children so she returned to Raymond where she got a job working in a restaurant. In 1946, she obtained in divorce.

Leora could not help noticing that a handsome, dark haired, heavy equipment mechanic and operator named Lawrence Hamilton ate a lot of meals at the restaurant and seem to spend more time watching her then he did eating. He was some operator all right; they were married 1947. Two years later, her second daughter was born and in 1952, a second son. Leora had health problems during this period which required three major operations. She returned to work for a couple of years to help pay the hospital bills.

Larry's job to get away from home a lot during the week and Leora had to take care of her five acre farm. She had a big garden, strawberries, chickens, ducks, cows, and four kids to raise. After twelve years, they sold the farm, bought a house in Raymond and moved into town.

In 1969, Leora bought four small cafe where she operated for twelve years with the help four girls. She retired in 1972 but it didn't take so she worked for while in a pizza parlor, then a Chinese restaurant and Dairy Queen. There he passed away in 1981 after thirty-three years of marriage. We are now has a part-time job just keep active. She works three or four hours a day in the deli of Patti grocery store across
the street for home.

Her son's both served in the Navy; one for twelve years and the oldest for twenty-seven years. Doug now lives in Maryland and Morris is in Washington D.C. They get home visit every couple of years. Gloria lives in Centralia and works for the Board of Education in Olympia. Patti is a clerk in the Dennis Company in Raymond. There are eight grandchildren; Kathy, Jeff and Gina; Sharon, Byron and Courtney; Todd and Craig. There are five great grandchildren: Travis, Curtis, Christina, Steve and Mylee.

Leora and Larry like to go camping and fishing. They had a lot on the lake above Mayfield Dam where they spend much of their leisure time. There was excellent fishing in the surrounding countryside. They told the boat on a trailer behind the RV.

A favorite area was the Olympic Peninsula and Sol Duc Hot Springs. They also hunted in Oregon and swung down through California visiting Roseville and Navato; returning on the coast route through the redwoods. Leora also enjoys gardening, sewing for the grandchildren and cooking.

They were in Vancouver in the day in Mount St. Helens blew her top. Driving back as far as Kelso, they had to detour through Longview and go down alongside the Columbia to return home via Naselle. Raymond got 1/2 inches of ash and then it rained as it is sometimes known to do in Western Washington. The pumice ash ran down the windows like mud.

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Placing this obituary in the family tree is difficult because this individual is not related. However, the influence she had in the lives of our family was felt by all.

Grace Holt was a close family friend, she lived just a mile or so from our home on Dixon Road. Grace was highly religious woman who seldom gave advice, but set the example and provided a role model for all those individuals who were friends. Her presence was always felt and her influence affected all.

While not related Grace Holt's role in the lives of our family was that of the Stately Aunt and matriarch. Her opinion was highly valued and sought-after. Her presence in my room would calm and quiet the most rambunctious youngsters. She was not related but she should have been.

Obituary: Grace William-Holt-Litchfield

Lacey, Thurston County, Washington-Longtime Raymond resident Grace Litchfield, 87, died Tuesday, September 22, 1998 in the Panorama City Convalescent Center at Lacey. This is Litchfield was born, July 1, 1911 at Laclede, Idaho to Henry H. and Emma [Goin] Williams, the original owners of The Hamburger Stand Restaurants in Raymond and South Bend.

She graduated from Raymond High School in 1929. Later, she attended nurses training at Grays Harbor College and became a licensed practical nurse in 1959. In 1928, she married Herbert L. Holt Orrin Raymond. The couple made their home in South Bend for many years before moving to the Smith Creek area outside of Raymond. He died in 1971.

In 1974, she married Wayne W. Litchfield, a former schoolmate. He died in 1979.

Mrs. Litchfield enjoyed her nursing career that the Willapa Harbor Hospital in South Bend and the Willapa Harbor Care Center of Raymond. When she could no longer do nursing herself, she educated in nursing student from India to replace her. Muriel Podder, currently lives and works in England.

Mrs. Litchfield was a founding member of the Raymond Nazarene Church. In 1950, she began helping disadvantaged foreign children through World Vision, providing food, clothing and financial support for their college education.

She is survived by a son, Orrin Holt of Mesa, Arizona; two daughters, Iola Smith of Lacey and Anita Smith of Bouse, Arizona; two stepsons, Stephen Litchfield of Old Town, Florida and Michael Litchfield of Rapid City, South Dakota; a brother, Alvin Williams of McMinnville, Oregon; 15 grandchildren; 30 great-grandchildren and 15 great great-grandchildren.

A graveside services set for 1 PM Friday, September 25, beside her first husband in the Fern Hill Cemetery at Menlo. Arrangements are in the care of Stroller'S Mortuary of Raymond. Memorial donations are suggested to the Raymond Nazarene Church, 1710 Park Avenue, Raymond, Washington 98577.
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e-mail from Debbie: Butch: I showed Mom the pictures you sent. Boy did it send her into memories.

The first picture is ofof Mom and Leora with their dolls. She said she was about two, which would make them taken in about 1923. The dolls were their Christmas presents and were their favorites. They were called "Horseman" (sp?) dolls. She said Grandma always tried to dress them alike, and if you look they are both wearing identical dresses in both pictures. She said the picture was taken outside the back of the house and the woodshed is in the background. When they would ride their horse Cuff he would always walk under the clothes line and try to knock them off.

She said the other picture is of her, Leora and Mackie with their dog Ring. Again Mom and Leora are wearing matching dresses. Mom and Mackie would be about seven, maybe eight. Mom and Mackie both got sick when they were six or maybe seven, and all Mackie's hair fell out. It was straight before, but when it grew back in it was kinky curly. So this picture would have to be when she was seven/eight due to the length of her hair. That would make it taken about 1929 or 1930. Grandma kept mom out of school for the whole year because she was so sick, and when she started back her and Mackie were in the same grade. Mom was born in August and Mackie in December of the same year, but they started out a year apart in school. That would make your mom and Mackie about two years apart in age. In looking at the pictures it looks to me like your mom and Mackie are about 7 and 9 or 8 and 10, which would be about right with Mom's approximate timeline.
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[NI0009] Article taken from Raymond Herald-date unknown.

Headline reads: Raymond Bills "Brakemen Bill"

Raymond [Special] "Brakemen Bill", well-known television personality, will engineering his "mainliner" from Seattle area to entertain children and adults alike Saturday at the Raymond high school auditorium with show starting at 1 and 3 o'clock.

The program is being sponsored by the Ninth Street Elementary PTA association. A full hour of fun and games is promised, and a bicycle will be given away. Color cartoons will be shown, also, and Bill's "crazy donkey and crazy auto" will be on the program.

This afternoon nine-year-old Gloria Swadener was to appear on Brakemen Bill's show to extend him a formal invitation on behalf of Raymond. Tickets for Saturday's event are available at the Western Auto Supply Store on third and Commercial streets. Accompanying Gloria Swadener to Seattle was her older brother Morris Swadener.

Editor's note: The invitation was extended to Gloria to appear on the show by Morris and Gloria's Uncle Clyde "Whitey" Swadener. Uncle Whitey was Brakemen Bill's manager and also managed several other TV personalities in the '50s and '60s at the three television stations in Seattle. Television being what was in the late 1950s proved to be an intimidating experience. After a long waiting period to prepare for going on camera Gloria was extremely nervous and finally when the big moment came and she appeared on camera with Brakemen Bill Gloria froze up and was unable to speak. A not untypical reaction from a small town girl and her first big television appearance. Brakemen Bill attempted to get Gloria to talk but she just stood there and stared at the camera. After several questions were asked Brakemen Bill turn to the director and said, "go to commercial".

Despite this experience with stage fright, Gloria and Morris went on to enjoy the time that they spend with their uncle, who gave him the grand tour of the Seattle television stations and several Seattle theaters. Brakemen Bill still came to Raymond.
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Article taken from Raymond Herald-date unknown.

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Hamilton announced the engagement of their daughter, Gloria June Swadener to Robert L.. Jackson, some of Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Jackson of South Bend. Miss Swadener will graduate from Raymond High School at the end of May. Her fiance is a graduate of South Bend High School and a station with the United States Air Force and Travis Air Force Base, California. No wedding date has been set.
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Copied from a newspaper clippings found in the personal effects of Leora E. Hamilton after her death in September, 2000. This is one of hundreds of newspaper clippings that Leora kept detailing the deeds and misdeeds of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. This particular article is a letter to the editor of the daily world, probably the Aberdeen Daily World. Date unknown.

Headline reads: Her First Letter Just Might Be Her Last

Editor, The Daily World

I believe I have a solution for the spotted owl dilemma: First, we must destroy all homes in United States built with "old-growth" trees. Of course, we need to start with the environmentalists' homes first, because if you believe in a "cause" then you must make some sacrifices.

Then we should perhaps "eliminate" all humans to use any paper products: toilet paper, paper towels, paper bags, writing paper and, of course, all newspapers.

We could start with all the environmentalists who write to the editors-sort of killed two birds with one stone. Then we must either close down all schools, a big source of paper waste, or return to the use of chalk and slate boards exclusively.

After we close schools, we must close down all private offices throughout the land. Can you imagine how many trees a murdered!

And last, but not least, the local, state and federal government offices, possibly the biggest source of paper users, must go to. Now, with everyone-not just the loggers-facing unemployment, which leads to hunger, homelessness, poverty and just general human suffering, everyone should be happy, because the spotted owl would no longer be an endangered species.

We won't be using trees to build houses, offices or industries. We won't need paper products. [Who could afford them anyway?]

Of course, there is a positive side. No more bills or junk mail in our mailboxes, and the dreaded IRS will be extinct. Oh well, they were a dinosaur anyway.

This is my first letter to editor and, I am sad to say, might be my last. I wouldn't want anyone to accuse me of killing a spotted owl.

Signed: Gloria J. Hall/Centralia

Editor's note: I think this was her last letter to the editor.

Gina's two youngest daughters play basketball for the Onalaska team, they both starters and pretty darn good players. Macy the oldest of the two, had to have all four wisdom teeth pulled on Friday. On Wednesday night Mandy broke her foot in the fourth quarter. (The second quarter, a girl on the other team, put her elbow in Mandy's eye and almost knocked her out. She has a nice shiner. Mandy has to go in for surgery this coming Wednesday and they have to put two pins in her little toe and her second toe. She will be out the rest of the season. Macy will probably be back in a couple of weeks. The coach is really upset. The team had a good chance of going to state. This is Macy's last year, but Mandy has two more years to go. (Girl's basketball isn't what it use to be.)


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Name /Participant Court Case Number File/Violation Date Case Type /Cause Cause/Code
1 Hall, Gloria June
Defendant Lewis County Dist I03990493 08-20-2004 Infraction Traffic
2 Hall, Gloria June
Defendant Aberdeen Municipal I00057324 08-01-2006 Infraction Traffic

[NI0010] 533-03-0368

Obituary for Lawrence Hamilton as it appeared in several local newspapers.

Raymond -- Lawrence "Larry" Hamilton, 71, a longtime Raymond resident, died Wednesday at an Olympia hospital.

Born June 30, 1909, Pioneer, Washington, he had lived in Raymond since 1946. Following his retirement from the Weyerhaeuser shake mill, he was a Forest Warden for the Department of Natural Resources.

Survivors include his wife, Leora, of the family home; three daughters, Loretta Roberts of Spokane, Pat Strozyk of Raymond, and Gloria Rohr of Chehalis; Morris Gail Swadener Jr. of Oak Harbor and Doug Hamilton, both serving in the United States Navy; a sister, Barbara Womack of Alameda, California; two brothers, Ralph Voltz of a Vancouver, Washington and Vic Voltz a Vancouver, Washington; eight grandchildren and other relatives.

The funeral will be at 10 AM Saturday at the Murphy Mortuary Chapel. Further information is listed in the funeral notice column.

Copy from a funeral remembrance card.

Lawrence Hamilton June 20, 1909, Feb. 25, 1981. Funeral services, Feb. 28, 1981, 10 AM at the Murphy Mortuary, Raymond, Pacific County, Washington. Officiating, the Rev. Richard Grinstad, pastor, our Savior's Lutheran Church . Casket bears: David Holmes, Lloyd Downey, Oliver Degg, Bob Mehring, Russ Davis, Jim Jensen, Vic Bockelman, Wayne Hall. Interment: sunset Memorial Park Chehalis, Lewis County, Washington. The Murphy Mortuary, Raymond, Washington.
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Born June 20, 1909, William Overland Voltz. Because of a dispute between his father, his two brothers (Ralph and Vic), sister (Barbara), and a new wife (Berdie) of the father, Larry, as he preferred to be called changed his name to Lawrence Hamilton.

Copied from original court documents.

In the Superior Court of the State of Washington
In and for the County of Spokane

In the Matter of the Change of Name of William O. VoltzCourt Order No. 35808

WILLIAM O. VOLTZDECREE OF CHANGE OF NAME

This matter coming on the state to be heard on the petition of William O. Voltz to have his name change to Lawrence Hamilton, he said William O. Voltz appearing in person and by his attorney, Theodore A. Scott, and evidence having been taken then considered by the court and it peering that he said William O. Voltz has for a number of years used and been known by the name of Lawrence Hamilton, and that he desires to have his name legally change to Lawrence Hamilton, and the court been fully advised in the premises.

It is hereby ORDERED AND DECREED that the name of William O. Voltz, the petitioner herein, be hereby is changed to Lawrence Hamilton, which, from this date forth, shall be the legal name of said petitioner.

Down in open court this 21st day of November, 1941.

Louis E. Bunge/Judge

Theodore A. Scott
601 Hutton Building
Spokane, Washington
Attorney for Petitioner

Filed November 21st 1941
Recorded volume 87, page 205

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The following is a transcript of the Eulogy read by Larry's Step-son, Morris G. Swadener Jr (Butch).

Lawrence Hamilton

Born:June 20, 1909

Died:February 25, 1981

Age:71

Sometimes we forget that there is more to life than just being born and dieing. In between, what takes place makes all the pain and suffering worth while.

Larry is gone now. There is nothing that anyone can say or do that will make the pain of his parting any less. Each of us knew Larry, knew what he was and where he stood. There was never any doubt what he believed. He was a man who spoke his mind.

Larry was many things to the people around him. He was a son, a husband, a father, a step-father, a grandfather, a neighbour, and a friend to many.

So what do you call this man whose prescence here on earth has affected so many people? What do you call a man who spent his youth just trying to survive what we now call the "Great Depression"? This youthful experience shaped and molded Larry's life to his last days.

As a youth he rode the boxcars with the countless thousands of other American men. Moving from town to town, looking for a place to sleep and a not to frequent meal. Larry, like those with whom he traveled, fought for an took any job that would give him a warm bed and a roof over his head.

What do you call this man who spent his young manhood seeking any job available and thus learning the skills what would earn his his livelyhood for the rest of his life? What Larry learned, he learned the hard way, from the "School of Hard Knocks", from which "NO MAN" ever graduates.

What do you call this man whose character was rough and tough as the world in which he raised himself? But, deep down inside this crusty old man "beat" a heart of gold. His gruff exterior masked his lack of understanding of his own children and grand-children. Yet, his love for them was expressed in many ways. How many times he came to my rescue when I had gotten myself in trouble. We have all been helped by Larry's generous nature. He would give you the shirt off his back, if he thought you needed it. But, if you hurt him, he would let you know about it.

What do you call this man who came into my life and became the father I never knew? He gave me a roof over my head, three square meals a day, and the clothers on my back. My mother and Larry were never rich, but I received all the things that I needed.

What do you call this man who gave me the discpline that I needed? I never counted all the spankings that Larry gave me, and as I look back there was only one spanking, that I can recall that I did not deserve. However, it made up for all the other times that I didn't get caught.

He gave me what I needed, not what I thought I wanted. Larry taught me the value of work and gave me a sense of purpose. Larry taught me that nothing was worth having, unless you worked for it and in the precess, earned it.

What do you call this man that in his waining years just could not bring hismself to retire. For the last three years he worked for the State of Washington as a fire warden. Even as CANCER struck him down, lying on his hospital bed, he began amking plans to return home and start a Lawn Mower Repair Service. He wanted to earn a little money and, just keep busy, knowing that he would never again be physcially able to work at a full time job.

What do you call this man, now gone.

What do you call Larry Hamilton?

What do I call Larry Hamilton?

I call him DAD.
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Copied from orginal court documents


In the SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR PACIFIC COUNTY

LAWRENCE HAMILTON, plaintiff

Vs.

ESTHER A. HAMILTON, defendant

INTERLOCUTORY ORDER OF DIVORCE

This action came on for trial the state upon the plaintiffs complaint. The plaintiff appeared in person and by his attorney, John J. Langenbach. The defendant having been personally served with process, her default was duly entered herein. The State of Washington appeared by the prosecuting attorney for Pacific County, Washington. The plaintiff introduced his testimony and proof, and court heard and considered the same.

THEREUPON, the court made in entered findings of fact and conclusions of law in favor of the plaintiff.

NOW, THEREFORE, IT IS BY THE COURT ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the plaintiff be, and he is hereby awarded an interlocked Tory order of divorce from the defendant on the grounds of cruelty.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED that the custody of the minor child of said parties, to-wit: Loretta Lee Hamilton, the awarded to the defendant with the right of reasonable visitation reserved to the plaintiff, in that the plaintiff pay for the support of said child the some of $50 per month beginning at the month of June 1947 until a further order of the court.

This Interlocutory Decree shall not be considered to your construed to have the effect of dissolving the marriage of the parties to this action, or of granting a divorce. After the expiration of six months from the date hear of, either the parties hereto, upon making proper application by motion or petition to the court, may have made and entered a final decree of absolute divorce dissolving the marriage.

Until such final decree shall have been duly made in entered, the marriage of the parties hereto is not dissolved, and remained husband and wife.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED. That each of said parties be provided with a copy of this interlocutory decree immediately after his entry and that proof of said service be filed herein.

DONE and open court this 6th day of June 1947.

John I. O'Phelan/judge

Service hereof by copy is hereby admitted this 6th day of June 1947.

Charles B. Welsh
Prosecuting Attorney for Pacific County, Washington

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for Pacific County

Lawrence Hamilton, plaintiff

Vs.

Esther A. Hamilton, defendant

Final decree of divorce

This matter came on for hearing this date upon the motion an application of the plaintiff for the final decree of divorce herein. It appeared to the court from said motion and from the files and records herein, that this court on the 16th day of June, 1947 made and entered its findings of fact and conclusions of law and an interlocutory order of divorce in favor of the plaintiff; that no appeal has taken therefrom; that more than six months have elapsed, and said parties have not resumed the marital relations, but ever since have been and now are living separate and apart and have not cohabited together.

Now, therefore, it is by the court ordered and adjudged and decreed that said interlocutory order of divorce be and it is hereby approved and confirmed in all of its particulars.

It is further ordered, adjudged and agreed that the bonds of matrimony and marriage now existing and being between said parties by and the same our hereby forever dissolved and severed.

Done in open court this 12th day of December, 1947.

John I. O'Phelan/Judge

[NI0011] Copied from a newspaper clipping found among the papers of Leora E. Hamilton after her death on Sept. 13, 2000. This was but one of several hundred newspaper and newspaper clippings found among her effects detailing the lives of her three children, her eight grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren.

My First Job: by Pat Hamilton

I started working in my mom and dad's cafe when I was 15. It was called the Hamburger Stand. It was located just between the parking lot of the Harbor Community Bank and the Elks building in Raymond. It was kind of neat the way it was set up, you went in on two doors on either side and you did all your cooking in front of the customers. It looks like an old trolley car and everybody sat on stools.

We had a gas grill and if the lights went out everybody would come down to the Hamburger Stand to eat. I basically learn how to cook by cooking for a lot of people in Raymond. I think I was paid a $1.65 an hour. The hamburger stand was kind of a local gathering place, people would come in and drink coffee and talk about the ballgame.

Sometimes we had to kind of cool the Raymond sports issue. That would get a little heated as a talk about the game last night. It was a nice place to gather and talk, nobody was a stranger. I think it only ceded about 25 people at the most. It was a real convivial place. It ran from 1964 to 1972.

One of the most humorous things I encountered was one individual who would come in and get hot cakes each morning and he wouldn't let me stir them. Once I poured the batter on the grill, normally I stir them to make them even, but he wouldn't let me. When I go to turn them over and he'd say, "no not yet". I couldn't flip KAPA until he said I could. It was that kind of place.

I also massacred eggs over easy, and if I didn't massacre it too much, I'd put it on the plate yoke down and hope he wouldn't notice. One morning I broke the eight and I was holding the stainless-steel spatula, and I turned instead to this customer, "you don't mind it is broken, do you?" I am pointing spatula at him as I said this and he said, "no".

My mom took me aside and said, "that looked little threatening." And I said, "oh, I'm sorry." Another thing we had to do was, Raymond used to flood quite a bit and it would flood in the backroom and we'd have to hope they lot of our machines wouldn't be ruined.

I worked the Hamburger Stand until the closing 1972, then I went to some other restaurants and its cooking, I cooked at the H&H Cafe and bowling alley, and I eventually went back to school and got in a different line of work.

Pat Hamilton graduated from Raymond High School in 1967 and went to Grays Harbor College in 1974, graduating their in 1976. She worked for Pacific County for two years, sold advertising for KAPA Radio for two years, then worked at Dennis Company until 1990. She was elected County Commissioner last fall and took office this January.

She has three children, Todd, Craig, and Heather.

Interviewed by any Neita Cecil
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from The Raymond Herald - Date unknown

Headlines read: Willapa Briefs - Man Injured in Crash

Raymond - Peter P. Emmerson, 19, 442 Second Street, Raymond, suffered lacerations on the chin and a bruise knee in an automobile accident at Highway 101 and Park Avenue in Raymond at 4:30 P.M. Tuesday, Raymond police said. Emmerson's 1963 car sustained $1,000.00 damage and a 1974 car driven by Patricia J. Strozyk, 30, Rt. 1, Box 305, Raymond sustained $1,900.00 damage, police said.
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Copied from newspaper clippings, the Raymond Herald-date unknown.

Headlines read: Hamilton Will Run for Reelection -- by Monica James

Pat Hamilton announced Friday that she will seek reelection as County commissioner.

Ms. Hamilton, who has served one term on the board, is the third person to enter the race. Challenges have been announced by Joan Kanon and Bruce Gardner, both Democrats as is Ms. Hamilton. Ms. Hamilton one position in 1990 in an upset victory over the incumbent Dave Wolfenbarger in the Democratic primary and Republican Don Flynn in the general election. Despite defections within the organization in the election campaign, Ms. Hamilton managed to win with 62 percent of the vote. Then employed as a salesperson at Dennis Company Ms. Hamilton made her successful race after being successful opposition to a proposed prison site at Raymond.

Since her election, Ms. Hamilton has been actively involved in the Twin Harbors Coalition and Colombian Pacific R C &D as part of an effort to increase job opportunities and economic development. She is the chair of the Olympic Area Agency on Aging which provides programs such as Pace and Meals on Wheels.

Ms. Hamilton has been elected to serve on the executive board of the Washington State Board of Counties. "It gives me an opportunity to express Pacific County's views with more exposure," she explained. Since her election, the County Board has worked to reduce the cost of building permits, she said, and simplify the process.

During the first two years after election Ms. Hamilton often constitute a one-woman minority opposed to the views of the other more environmentally conscious board members.

Since 1992 election, the new Board has come down more often on the side of private property rights.

Ms. Hamilton is a graduate of Raymond High School and Grays Harbor College. She is divorced with two sons and resides in Raymond.
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Copied from Willapa Harbor Herald, Wednesday, March 13, 2002, page 4

Letter to the editor, titled "Hamilton not a leader in Democratic Party.

To the Editor: Last week's edition described County Commissioner Pat Hamilton as a leader in the Democratic Party. I take issue with that statement. As someone who has been an active Democrat at the county, legislative districtk, congressional district, and state level, I can attest to the fact that Ms. Hamilton has not been a leader in the Democratic Party. Ms. Hamilton is an elected official who has run and won twice (actually three times) filing as a Democrat. If she seeks reelection this year, I hope she has the guts to be honest and file as a Republican. Sincerely, Beverly Olson, Bay Center.

Editor's Note. While at odds with many local "I wanna be in charge" misfits and malcontents, Pat gets the job done. She makes things happen and has saved the taxpayers of Pacific County a bundle. Beverly Olson's words are typical of those few whose minds are small and lack the sense to come out of the rain, let alone pass judgement on a hard working public servant. Give "em" hell Pat.
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Hamilton swaps parties, says she 'wouldn't rule out' bid for House or Senate - Looks to representing her rural county, favoring jobs over radical environmental programs

By M.L. Madison
The Daily News

May 14, 2003


Pacific County, WA - Pacific County Commissioner Pat Hamilton, who was elected to a fourth term as a Democrat last November, announced Tuesday that she is changing political parties and may challenge 19th District Rep. Brian Blake or Sen. Mark Doumit this fall.

Hamilton voted to appoint Doumit, D-Cathlamet, to the Senate last November, and also voted to appoint Blake, D-Aberdeen, to the House. On Tuesday, she said she was joining the Republican party because Democrats are more concerned with environmental issues than jobs.

"Let's put it this way: There's a real close tie between the Democratic party and the green people that want to save the environment," she said. "And I'm not against that. But we have two Washingtons here. We have the urban Washington, where everybody wants to go out and save the wilderness, and then you have our county."

Hamilton said she "wouldn't rule out" challenging Doumit or Blake this fall, but declined to criticize their legislative records. Both men, as well as 19th District Rep. Brian Hatfield, D-Raymond, have introduced regulation reform legislation in Olympia.

Pacific County Commissioner Jon Kaino, a Democrat who has served with Hamilton for a decade, said her announcement "was a little surprise."

"We have a fair number of two to 1 votes, but she's not always the dissenting one," Kaino said.

Commissioner Norm "Bud" Cuffel, who could not be reached for comment, is also a Democrat.

Kaino declined to say whether or not Hamilton's party switch would hurt her with Pacific County voters, who tend to elect Democrats by large majorities.

"I think, in our county, the majority are Democrats clearly, but they're very conservative Democrats," he said.

Blake, who has known Hamilton for several years, said she was generalizing about the Democratic party, which "has room for many interests."

"I think the reps in the 19th district, including the current slate we have now, have fought for common sense legislation," Blake said. "Would I be disappointed if she (Hamilton) ran against me or Mark? Yeah, I suppose I would be, but that's the way the world works. I'm going to be running my campaign the same way regardless of who runs against me."

So far, Eric Hansen and Mike Kayser, both of Castle Rock, have announced they are running against Blake. Hansen is running as a Democrat and Kayser, who lost to Hatfield in 2002, is running as a Republican.

No one has challenged Doumit, who could not be reached for comment Tuesday evening.

Cowlitz County Democratic Chairman Butch Eldridge said he "wouldn't be surprised" if there was an effort to recall Hamilton from her commissioner position or if she ran against Blake or Doumit this fall.

"There's no other reason to switch parties," he said. "The (Democratic) party hasn't changed in the last six months. If she wanted to run as a Republican, she should have run as a Republican."

Hamilton said she expected "people to be very angry with me," and described changing parties as "an uncomfortable switch."

"If I was just looking for my own personal comfort, I wouldn't have done this," she said.

RELATED STORY:

Pat Hamilton joins GOP, raps 'greens'

By Levi Pulkkinen - Daily World writer

SOUTH BEND - Saying the Democrats have shifted too far to the left on environmental issues, four - term Pacific County Commissioner Pat Hamilton of Lebam has joined the Republican Party and isn't ruling out a bid for higher office.

"The old Democratic Party was a voice for the unemployed and a strong voice for both rural and urban working families," Hamilton said in a letter to Washington State Democratic Party Chairman Paul Berendt. "Today's Green Democratic Party is more concerned with wetlands and animal rights than it is with the human equation.

"These extremists believe rural Washington should serve as a parkland so they have somewhere to visit on the weekends when the pressure of stock options, monorails, and triple mochas become too much to bear," the commissioner said in her letter. "In truth, it seems the only jobs Green Democrat politicians want to protect are those of public employees, the same bureaucrats that have regulated our country to its knees."

Calling Hamilton's assertion "absurd," former state senator Sid Snyder of Long Beach told The Daily World today he feels her accusations dismiss the achievements of the Coastal Caucus under his leadership.

"Because of the leadership position that I held ... we did a lot of good for this community," Snyder said. "We have worked within the Democratic Party and been able to accomplish a lot for rural areas."

Chairman Berendt said, "I believe that there's another factor here - that ... for Pat, upward mobility has been kind of blocked.

"This action is more about trying to re - energize a dead career ... than any of the issues she mentioned. I think there is more to this than meets the eye.

"I would not be surprised to see her seek legislative office," the party leader said.

Berendt noted that the commissioner was interested in the House seat vacated by Mark Doumit when the Cathlamet Democrat replaced Sen. Snyder last year.

Hamilton said she hasn't ruled out running for a state - level position.

"I've been asked to consider a state office, but, quite frankly, at this point my plate is pretty full," she said.

Calling Hamilton a strong advocate for property rights, Pacific County's Republican chairman, Bob Ryan of Raymond, said he is very pleased that she made the switch.

"Those of us who know her and work with her, it's just a natural progression for her," Ryan said. "Across the state, the reaction has been positive and we're very happy."

Acknowledging that party officials have discussed Hamilton's state - level ambitions with the commissioner, Ryan promised more details would be available later.

In her letter, Hamilton accused the Democratic Party leadership of pandering to the Green Party, a charge Berendt adamantly denies.

"Maybe the last straw came in January when I attended the re - organization meeting where you laid out a 10 - point plan for the next year," Hamilton wrote. "Item three on the list was to invite more Greens into the Democratic Party, to focus even more on appeasing the environmental extremists who bolted the party in 2000."

Berendt said he addressed the problems the Green Party caused the Democrats in the 2000 presidential election, but said he did not call for appeasement or changes within the party's ideology.

"I didn't say, 'Go out and kiss a Green Party member' or anything like that," the chairman said. "I think her statement is really stretching what I said at that meeting."

In her letter of resignation from the party, Hamilton accuses the Democrats of making environmental protection a priority in rural areas while neglecting economic development. She said Democrat - supported laws, such as the Shorelines Management Act and the Forests & Fish rule show a Seattle bias within the party and a disregard for rural communities.

Sen. Doumit said today that the party seeks the middle ground on many natural resource issues, and has pushed for legislation supported by the state's Farm Bureau and various forestry associations.

"To a member, I don't know of any of them who haven't been willing to listen to enhance our rural jobs," Doumit said. "Pat's always been a pretty conservative Democrat, but most of us are in Southwest Washington. I wouldn't say that she is more pro - jobs than anyone else; we've all been working really well."

Saying that Democratic legislators like Snyder and Doumit have been the staunchest and most successful advocates for economic development in the Legislature's history, Berendt questioned Hamilton's record on growth.

"The fact of the matter is, Pat's been MIA when it comes to bringing jobs to that part of the state," the party chairman said. "She's attended several of our meetings and has never uttered a peep about any concern she's had on the party platform or any of its issues."

Berendt also said the party's ideological base has not shifted toward Puget Sound.

"We are a state party, and we believe in the full - court press," the chairman said. "We believe that the coast is a part of our base that is very important to us. (Southwest Washington's) issues are just as important as the issues in King County or other parts of the state."

In reference to Hamilton's accusation that the Democrats adopted an extremist environmental policy, Berendt added that he is "not going to apologize for fighting for clean drinking water here."

Hamilton said she will stick to her guns and attempt to weather the storm of criticism she expects to descend upon her.

"I'm prepared for the fallout, but sometimes we have to step out and put out what we really believe," said the commissioner, adding that "part of it is just to start the discussion."

Berendt said the Democrats will bide their time until 2006, when Hamilton's term as commissioner will expire.
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Hamilton won’t seek another term
BY Steven Friederich - Daily World Writer
Thursday, April 20, 2006 11:24 AM PDT
Print Version | E-mail This Story
*

SOUTH BEND — After 16 years in office, Pacific County’s feisty and quotable county commissioner, Pat Hamilton, will not seek a fifth term this fall.

“I’ve just decided not to run,” Hamilton, a Republican convert from Lebam, told The Daily World. “Everything is going pretty well in North Pacific County and during the ’90s that wasn’t necessarily the case. It’s a high note for me and it’s time to say I want to try something different” — perhaps as a federal emergency services worker.

Three candidates — two Democrats and a Republican — have lined up for the open seat. The job pays $45,921 annually.

Clay Harwood, 57, who serves on the Pacific County Planning Commission and the Raymond School Board, made his candidacy clear in February. Another Democrat, Michael Spencer, 63, a longtime state Department of Ecology employee, announced his candidacy this week. Ryan Harriman, 27, the assistant Public Works director for the City of Raymond, told The Daily World he plans to run as a Republican.

Hamilton, 57, said she’s not endorsing anyone just yet, “though Ryan Harriman is probably the best pre-qualifier for the job.”

Hamilton, who left the Democratic Party in 2003 and lost to Mark Doumit, D-Cathlamet, in a bid for the State Senate, said she has no plans to resign her seat and intends on serving out the term, which ends in December.

Whoever gets the job will have a big learning curve, Hamilton said.

“It takes four years to learn the job,” she said. “And it gets more complex every year.”

Hamilton said she is leaving the commission on a high note. During her first two years in office the county barely had any money in reserves, she said. That’s been built up to $3 million. Hamilton said it could be better “but it’s reasonable and better than it has been.”

“It’s taken a long time and we were challenged by individuals all the way while we did it,” she said. “A bad murder trial can run you millions. We’ve had things happen we hadn’t had before, so that reserve, while it sounds like a lot of money, it’s necessary.

“The county is sitting in the best position it has been in many years,” she added.

FEMA volunteer

Hamilton said that for the last two years, instead of taking a vacation to the Bahamas, she’s been volunteering with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Last year when Hurricane Katrina devastated the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts, Hamilton went with FEMA to help survivors.

In fact, she’s trying to position herself as a candidate for a full-time job with FEMA. She admits that would likely take her out of the county, but she’s ready for it.

“People assume FEMA is a big agency but it’s really just volunteers dropping what they do,” Hamilton said. “After two years doing that as a volunteer, I find that it’s something that I love.

“My family’s here, though, and I don’t want to move so far away where I can’t ever see my four wonderful grandchildren, so we’ll see what happens.”

The only Republican

Hamilton said 13 people have challenged her for a seat on the commission over the last few years. In 2003, she made headlines when she decided that she could no longer be a Democrat.

“These extremists believe rural Washington should serve as a parkland so they have somewhere to visit on the weekends when the pressure of stock options, monorails and triple mochas become too much to bear,” Hamilton said at the time. “In truth, it seems the only jobs Green Democrat politicians want to protect are those of public employees. (They’re) the same bureaucrats that have regulated our country to its knees.”

“Being a Republican personally aligned me with the things I really believe in and I don’t regret it,” Hamilton told The Daily World this week.

“The only time the political party makes a big difference is when you’re trying to get something through the Legislature. At the county level, you are basically running a business.”

Hamilton and fellow Commissioner Jon Kaino say county commissioner races should be non-partisan races.

“There’s no politics in running county government,” Kaino said. “And we respect anyone who comes to office, regardless of what their party affiliation is. We’ve hardly ever disagreed and when we do, it’s never over a partisan issue. We don’t deal with those.

“As long as a commissioner does the homework and is relatively lucid I don’t care if I agree with them over partisan issues.”

Kaino said whoever becomes the new commissioner will have to help the commission figure out how to handle the county’s rising meth problem and deal with a moratorium on development in the dune area of Seaview in South Pacific County.
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Doumit, Blake win
By M. L. Madison
Nov 05, 2003 - 08:32:14 am PST


After an aggressive and expensive campaign, incumbent Sen. Mark Doumit, D-Cathlamet, beat back a challenge from Pacific County Commissioner Pat Hamilton.

Early returns showed Doumit leading Hamilton by nearly 2 to 1, capturing about 64 percent of the vote.

"Anything better than 60 percent was going to be kind of a bonus," said Doumit, 42, as he waited for returns at the Cowlitz County Courthouse Tuesday night.

Hamilton, 54, said she would have liked a stronger showing, but she said she had no regrets about running.


"It was my first time out. I'm new to Cowlitz County, and turning Republican was shocking," said Hamilton, who joined the GOP in May. "It was a learning experience, and the next time, you're always better at what you do."

The Lebam resident wouldn't say outright if she would challenge Doumit again next year, but she indicated that she would run for the Legislature again, noting that there "are many legislators that lost their first race."

"Don't count me out," she said. Throughout the campaign, each accused the other of negative campaigning. Doumit said he spent a good amount of time clarifying his voting record after "attack mailers" from Hamilton's supporters.

"People realized that it was really a nasty campaign, and they don't appreciate this," he said Tuesday night.

Hamilton countered that Doumit's camp "threw everything at me in the end, including (former state Sen.) Sid Snyder."

Hamilton campaigned mainly in support of tort reform and rollbacks of some state environmental regulations. She also worked on legislation to with Sen. Joyce Mulliken, R-Ephrata, that would exempt businesses in economically depressed areas from state environmental regulations, if those regulations were higher than federal standards.

With strong support from Senate Republicans, she raised more than $100,000, coming close to Doumit, who raised approximately $131,000, according to the state's Public Disclosure Commission.

"We've never had the kind of dollars spent against us, in this District, and in such a negative way," Doumit said Tuesday night.

Both candidates said Tuesday that their immediate plans are to spend more time with family.

"It's very time consuming to run a campaign, and this is two years back to back," said Doumit, who was appointed to replace former Sen. Majority Leader Sid Snyder of Long Beach last year.

Hamilton said she is looking forward to spending time with her two-month-old grandson.

"I'll actually get to introduce myself," she said. State Senate 19th District

Mark Doumit, Democrat 11,208 (64 percent)
Pat Hamilton, Republican 6,348 (36 percent)

[NI0012] Copy from newspaper article-date unknown.

Headline reads: Grayland Crash Injures Youth

South Bend-A Raymond youth was injured and a car demolished in a traffic accident Saturday at 8:45 PM reported by the Washington State Patrol to the sheriff's office yesterday. The mishap occurred on Highway 105, 1.7 miles south of Grayland.

Douglas L. Hamilton, 17, Raymond, was a driver of the 1968 model sedan which went out of control, veered into a power pole for an overturned landing on its top.

Don White, 15 of 860 Peter Street, a passenger in the vehicle suffered a fractured right arm and right leg and was taken to the Willapa Harbor Hospital by a Heiden Ambulance Service. A driver was not injured.

[NI0013] THE FAMILY OF EARL AND ETHEL SWADENER

(as remember by son Francis Robert Swadener and written by his wife Helen)
June 1990

Alva Earl and Ethel Fritz Swadener were married in Spokane, Washington on August 14, 1909. Alva was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania on February 25, 1886. Ethel was born in Fremont, Kansas on December 18, 1888. Ethel had been employed at the Crescent Department store in Spokane and Earl was employed in the hardward business at the time of their marriage.

Their first home was Spokane and their first child, Alva Earl (1) Swadener Jr. was born there on June 9, 1910. The second son, Richard Fritz (2) Swadener was also born in Spokane on March 17 1912. They moved to Vancouver, BC, where Alva worked in hardware store and it was there that a son, Francis Robert (3) Swadener was born on December 3, 1913. Their stay in Vancouver was short and by the time that Francis Robert (3), (aka Bob) was a few months old they moved to Seattle where they lived the rest of their lives.

Nine more children to them, so Bob was the only one not born in the State of Washington. Morris (4) Gail Swadener was born on June 17, 1915; Georgia LIllian (5) Swadener was born on April 15, 1917; Maxine (6) Swadener on September 22, 1918; Burton (7) Swadener on August 12, 1920; Clyde Elwin (8) Swadener on November 23, 1921; Lyle Merle (9) Swadener on November 10, 1923; Barbara Ellen (10) Swadener on August 9, 1925; Orville Ewing (11) Swadener on April 30, 1928; and Betty Jane (12) Swadener was born on January 24, 1933.

In Seattle, they lived first on Ward Street near Eastlake, them moved to Gatewood in West Seattle. In order to enlarge the Gatewood School, the Seattle School District bought the property, where the family lived and they moved to North Seattle. Their home there was at 1202 NE 97th, which was them outside the city limits. The house was unfinished and the family moved into the basement. Later a deck was built over the unfinished basement garage and the family moved into that part of the building.

Sleeping spaces for the growing family were on the second floor. This second floor room was one big room with no dividing walls and was never finished as long as the Swadeners lived there. Later Earl Sr. and Ethel bought a smaller house next door and sold the big house. After Ethel's death, Earl bought a house in the Lynnwood area which was his home until he died in 1966.

Ethel was in poor health as she was afflicted with diabetes and she died on September 20, 1945, at the age of 57. The youngest child, Betty was 12 years old at the time.

Earl was alone for a time and then married, but the marriage did not last long and they were divorced. Later he married Janelle, who died in the mental hospital in Sedro Woolley, Washington, after a short time.

Earl's trade was hardware. He was working in a hardware store in Spokane when they were married, worked in hardware in Canada and continued in the hardware trade in seattle. He went into business for himself in about 1922, owning and operating a hardware store on Bothell Way in Seattle. Ethel worked in the store with Earl, doing the bookeeping as well as working trade. Since there was usually a baby in the house, she took the youngest with her and it was sometime the baby carriage and care for it until the parents come home.

The depression came, and in either 1931 or 1932 he closed it down - did not go through bankruptcy - just close it down and took the inventory home. Some of these items were with him until his death.

During the time he had the hardware store, he also dealt in dynamite and after the closure of the store he worked in blasting and dynamite. He worked for some time for the contractor who was constructing City Light dams on the Skagit. During World War II he went to the Aleutian Islands to work for the Federal Government. After his return from Alaska, he continued taking jobs in blasting and working with dynamite in the Seattle area where he and his skills were much in demand. He never officially retired but continued to work jobs that he could handle until he suffered a stroke in his late seventies. He spent some time in a nursing home and died on June 25, 1966.

Alva Earl Jr. also known as Earl married Margaret Sweet and they had two daughters, Anne and Sally. He was employed at Boeing for about 40 years and his death on October 23, 1971 was due to cancer.

Richard Fritz (Dick) joined the Navy at a very young age and retired aftr 23 years, them worked for Seattle City Light before retiring again. Dick never married and is now living in the Clearview area near Snohomish, Washington. (Editor's Note: Dick past away on April 8, 1994)

Francis Robert (Bob) began working at an early age, first selling nespapers, then working at a bakery near the family hardware store. He stayed with the baking trade for 16 years then worked at Seattle City Light for 29 years. On June 27, 1936 he married Lenora Brown and they had three children, Carol Lee, Mary JO and Bill. Lenora died of cancer in 1978 after they had moved to a home on Canyon Creek area near Granite Falls. In 1983 he was married to Helen Gjovaag and continues to live part time at the Canyon Creek home and part time at Helen's condominium in Marysville.

Morris Gail Swadener went into the army at a young age. Before going overseas in World War II, he married Leora Ethel Pederson and they had two children, Morris Gail (Butch) Swadener and Gloria June Swadener. When he returned, he and Leora divorced and Gail made his home in Texas. He was remarried there and there were several children but the marriage ended in divorce and Gail maintained a home for himself and the children. After being discharged form the Army, Gail worked as a mechanic for American Airlines until his retirement. He lived for a time in the San Diego area and moved back to Washington State to live in Chehalis area near his daughter, Gloria. His health was not good and he was under medical care. Eventually he wanted to get back to the Southern California climate and moved back to the San Diego area where he now resides. (Editor's Note: Gail suffered a series of heart attacks, moved to Florida and lived withis daughter Mary for a period of time in 1997/98. In May 1998 he returned to California to a nursing care facility in Ontario, near his daughters Anita and Susie.)

Little is known of Gerogia. Attempts to contact her have not been successful. She was married and some time lived in California. Recently word was received that she had died in Michigan but no other particulars are known.

Maxine married Mason (Bob) Newman, a sailior who she met in Seattle. Since he was career Navy they lived in a variety of places before his retirement. They had spent some time in Turkey and Guam, as well as several bases in the Unitied States. They had one son, Bob who also spent time in the Navy. After Mason's retirement from the Navy they lived for a time in Mountlake Terrace where he raise rhododendrons and azaleas. Later they sold this and moved to a home at Cape Horn on the Skagit River near Sedro Woolley. From there they moved to a home on Canyon Creek near Maxine's brother Bob. Later Mason was confined to a nursing home and Maxine sold the Canyon Creek home and moved into an apartment in Lynnwood. She became ill with bronchitis, emphysema and heart problems. She died in a hospital in Edmonds on June 14, 1990.

Burt was also a Navy man. After his retirement from the navy he came back to Seattle and worked for Seattle City Light unitl retirement. After one or two unsuccessful marriages he married Elaine and they had seven children. Burt was not the easiest person to live with and he and Elaine were finally divorced. He had poor health complicated with alcoholism and died on May 1, 1985. Elaine later remarried and lives in Seattle.

Clyde Elwin, known as Whitey, joined the Navy at a young age and after his discharge, worked at a variety of things, much of it in the entertainment business. He organized tours, managed theaters and other related jobs. He adopted several children but never had a marriage that lasted. His home is in the San Diego area.

Lyle and Barbara went to live with Ethel's sister Florence and her husband Fred in the Portland area when they were very young. The Swadener family had grown very large and as Florence and Fred had no children they were glad to have these two to raise as their own. They lived there during their growing years but a contact with the rest of the Swadeners was maintained.

During World War II, Lyle went into the Army Air Force and was a gunner-radio operator in the CBI area. (China, Burma, India). After the war Lyle returned to Portland and became a successful business man. He worked as a car salesman and was in the car leasing business. He was married to Gloria and had one daughter. This marriage terminated and he married Carol Ann and they had a daughter. Carol Also had a daughter by a previous marriage. They were a close and happy family. Lyle and Carol Ann celabrated their 25th wedding anniversary in 1986. On Chhristmas Eve, 1988, Lyle suffered a cerebral aneurism and never regained consciousness, dying on Christmas day 1988.

Barbara married Joe Gracia and they had two children. They were later divorce and Barbara married Don Hamre. Their home is in Oakland.

Orville joined the Navy while quite and became a career Navy man. After retiring, he graduated from college and worked at a variety of jobs. At one time he was employed at Sears and then was a bus driver for the city of San Diego. He was married several times and has at least two children. He is now retired and lives in San Diego. (Editor's Note: Orville passed away on May 17, 1998, dying from complications of colon cancer.)

Betty, the youngest of the Swadeners, has a number of hobbies and lives by herself, in a home in the Snohomish area. She is employed in a manufacturing plant in the area, raises and trains dogs and has other animals on her rural property. She attends dog shows and has a small business of selling items that appeal to the dog trainers there. Some of the items are sweatshirts with pictures and sayings that appeal to dog trainers. Though she spends little time with the rest of the family, it seems to be because she is such a busy person. She is pleasant, cheerful, and nice to be around. She is a strong church person.

Of the twelve Swadener children there are now seven of them still (06-15-91) living. Six of the boys were in the Armed Forces and were on active duty in World War II. (Editor's Note: With death of Orville, only four, Bob, Gail, Barbara, and Betty are left (June 14, 1998).

The family is scattered and do not see each other often. They do keep in touch, mainly by telephone and the relationships are all friendly.

[NI0021] Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery Point Loma, San Diego County, California
* Records with an asterisk at the end indicates those that have not been verified by the U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs. Please visit "VA Cemetery Verification Project" for details on what this means

Swadener, Clyde Elwin, b. 11/23/1921, d. 04/04/1997, US Navy, SK2, Res: San Diego, CA, Plot: CBC 3 200, bur. 04/10/1997

SWADENER, CLYDE ELWIN
SK2 US NAVY
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 12/04/1942 - 03/10/1945
DATE OF BIRTH: 11/23/1921
DATE OF DEATH: 04/04/1997
DATE OF INTERMENT: 04/10/1997
BURIED AT: SECTION CBC ROW 3 SITE 200
FT. ROSECRANS NATIONAL CEMETERY
P.O. BOX 6237 P.O. BOX 6237 SAN DIEGO , CA 92166
(619) 553-2084 (619) 553-2084

[NI0022] SSN # 543-14-1288

Willamette National Cemetery
Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon

* Records with an asterisk at the end indicates those that have not been verified by the U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs. Please visit "VA Cemetery Verification Project" for details on what this means.

Swadener, Lyle M, b. 11/10/1923, d. 12/25/1988, TSG USAAC, Plot: WMCI R4 N604, bur. 12/30/1988, *

SWADENER, LYLE M
TSGT US ARMY AIR CORPS
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 01/25/1943 - 10/20/1945
DATE OF BIRTH: 11/10/1923 DATE OF DEATH: 12/25/1988
DATE OF INTERMENT: 12/30/1988
BURIED AT: SECTION COL-1 ROW M SITE 604
WILLAMETTE NATIONAL CEMETERY
11800 SE MT. SCOTT BOULEVARD
PORTLAND, OR 97266
(503) 273-5250

[NI0024] SSN # 533-22-5494

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery Point Loma, San Diego County, California
* Records with an asterisk at the end indicates those that have not been verified by the U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs. Please visit "VA Cemetery Verification Project" for details on what this means

Swadener, Orville, b. 04/30/1928, d. 05/18/1998, US Navy, AOC, Res:
San Diego, CA, Plot: Q 0 C-30A, bur. 05/21/1998

SWADENER, ORVILLE
AOC US NAVY
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 05/12/1944 - 05/18/1964
DATE OF BIRTH: 04/30/1928
DATE OF DEATH: 05/18/1998
DATE OF INTERMENT: 05/21/1998
BURIED AT: SECTION Q SITE C-30A
FT. ROSECRANS NATIONAL CEMETERY
P.O. BOX 6237 P.O. BOX 6237
SAN DIEGO , CA 92166
(619) 553-2084 (619) 553-2084

[NI0027] Richland County Cemetery Records, Richland county Chapter of OGS,
p104 - Interments in Bellville Cemetery, Jefferson Twp
SWADNER, Mrs. Lilllie born Richland County, resident of New Castle PA, 3 Oct
1865-28 Aug 1900
(two more after 1960 - did not copy)

p141. Baldwin Middlebury Cemetery, Knox County (!) Middlebury Twp, on the
south side of County Line Road (Leedy Rd) (This is filed under Jefferson
Twp, so assume that it is on the county line. cks)
SWADENER
John, d Jun 23, 1862, age 78-8-25
Rachel, w/o John, Jan 8, 1879, age 84-1-19
Adana Annette d/o J.F. and M. d 3 Mar 1863, age 4 yr, 21 days
J.F. 1829-1902 (Could this be your Joseph?)
Maria BEAN, w/o J.F. 1827-1908
John B. 1865-1947
C. Belle w/o John 1878----
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
In an e-mail from David Penman:

I have been doing some research on line in the last few days and have some new info to add to the Swadener line. I am sending you some attachments of census records so you can view the source of the information as well.

Frank E. Swadener married Lillie Hamilton and we don't have any info on Lillie, until now. She was the daughter of Samuel Hamilton and Susan Holland. This family lived in the Jefferson Township, Richland County, Ohio area for many years and I found them in the 1860, 1870 and 1880 census. Samuel was born about 1829 and his father was from Ireland...so now you have some Irish blood in ya and Susan Holland was born about 1830 in Ohio. An interesting letter appears in the 1870 census under the race column.

It is the letter "O" and there is a note telling what the letter stands for...OCTOROON. I'll save you the time of having to look it up...it means 1/8 black/negro ancestry. Shocked? Interesting, eh? While the census taker made corrections, he also made an error. Both parents and a couple of the children were listed as "W" and then corrected with an "O". It could only be one of the parents and since Samuel is Irish, I would venture to say that Susan was 1/4 negro. That would mean that either her mother or father was 1/2 negro and we are fortunate that in the 1860 census we find her mother living with the family along with Samuel's mother.

Also have the marriage date of 4 Sept. 1851 in Richland County from the Ohio Marriage Index. Check it out...got the whole family to list on this one as well. Do you have broadband internet? I'm going to send the 1870 record as an attachment for now just in case it takes awhile to download and if you have broadband I'll send the rest later at one time. Let me know. Take care.


[NI0028] As reported by Jeanne Yoakam

I went back to the OGS in Mansfield today (March 4, 2000) and got the 1850 censuses for the Sweadners, Swadeners, Swaidners of Greene, Columbiana, and Richland counties, Ohio.

Your Joseph French Swadner (age 20 in 1850) probably got his middle name from his grandmother who was living with them in 1850, a Ruth French, age 72. Rachel was probably a Rachel French who married John Swadner. John was listed as 62 from Maryland, and Rachel as 58 from Virginia. Ruth French was 72 and from Maryland, Joseph was 20 and a laborer from Ohio.

[NI0029] Copied from the "Belleville Messenger, June 20, 1902"
Xerox copy of the newspaper page donated by Jeanne Yoakam, available for viewing

Quote:

"Mrs. Maria Swadener and son, John, returned to their home near Bangorville (Ohio) Monday evening, after a visit with her son, Frank (Edwin Swadener), at New Castle, PA. Frank's two youngest boys (Harley and Gail Swadener) returned with them for a visit."

[NI0030] Johannes SCHWEDNER Sex: M
Event(s):
Christened: 5 Jul 1789 Woodsboro, Saint Peters Lutheran Church, Frederick, Maryland
Parents: Father: Andreas SCHWEDNER
Mother: Catharina

Richland County Cemetery Records, Richland county Chapter of OGS,
p104 - Interments in Bellville Cemetery, Jefferson Twp
SWADNER, Mrs. Lilllie born Richland County, resident of New Castle PA, 3 Oct
1865-28 Aug 1900
(two more after 1960 - did not copy)

p141. Baldwin Middlebury Cemetery, Knox County (!) Middlebury Twp, on the
south side of County Line Road (Leedy Rd) (This is filed under Jefferson
Twp, so assume that it is on the county line. cks)
SWADENER
John, d Jun 23, 1862, age 78-8-25
Rachel, w/o John, Jan 8, 1879, age 84-1-19
Adana Annette d/o J.F. and M. d 3 Mar 1863, age 4 yr, 21 days
J.F. 1829-1902 (Could this be your Joseph?)
Maria BEAN, w/o J.F. 1827-1908
John B. 1865-1947
C. Belle w/o John 1878----


IGI Record

Johannes SCHWEDNER, Sex: M, Event(s): Christening: 5 Jul 1789, Grace Evangelical Lutheran Or Formerly St. Peters Church, Rocky Hill, Frederick, Maryland
Parents: Father: Andreas SCHWEDNER, Mother: Catharina

Source Information: Batch number: Dates: Source Call No. Type: Printout Call No. Type
C504281 1767-1875 0845442 IT 4 Film 0933974 Film

[NI0031] HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. - 429

The election list above, and the following pioneers residing in the township in 1869, who were in the count prior to 1820, will give a good knowledge in reference to the first settlers of the township

NameAge in 1869Came to County.Native State.
Rachael Swadener*751817Virginia

* Now dead (1879)

[NI0032] From the Grace Radcliff Evans Report.

Children: John and Salome.
The records of these two children by Mr. Frank Norwood in the records of the Rocky Hill Lutheran Church, Frederick County, Maryland. The father's name was spelled Andreas Schwedner which was german for "Andrew Sweadner"

Folio 388-399 dtd 7 Jan 1819

Elizabeth RAITT vs Andrew SWAIDNER, Nathan RAITT and others

On Oct 1792, Andrew SWAIDNER (now in OHIO) bought from Christian SAILOR, 3 acres and
one rood of land in Frederick County, part of "The Mill Wrights Design" of which he sold to
Elizabeth RAITT.

On 21 Nov 1797, David ROOP purchased with other lands the balance of "The Mill Wrights
Design" from Christian SAILOR; but, title for all the land was given to Roop in the deed.
Although Roop acknowledged this, he died without making conveyance to Elizabeth who has a
house on this small section. The land (162 ac) lies on both sides of Beaver Dam and is adjoined by
the lands of John RAITT, Christian SMITH, John DEALE and Nicholas ISENBERG.


David ROOP died intestate
Children -
1. Margaret w/o Nathan RAITT
2. Ann w/o Joel PUSEY
3. John, minor
4. Christian, minor
5. Sally, minor
6. Elizabeth, minor

Christian and Elizabeth died before 19 May 1819 and by then John was 21.


Christian SAYLOR died intestate
widow - Elizabeth
Children -
1. Daniel, eldest son
2. Martin
3. Anna w/o Abraham NAVE
4. Catharine w/o John SINBOUR (SANBOWER?)
5. Barbara w/o Isaac STONER
6. John, minor
7. Christian, minor
8. Elizabeth, minor

Dr. Henry BAKER appointed John KINZER as guardian; order finalized Jul 1819.
********************************

[NI0034] John Swadener and His Descendants by Grace Radcliff Evans Decatur, Illinois 1919

FIRST GENERATION

1 John Swadener

Elizabeth Swadner, his wife

As I can find no records of these ancestors, except the will on John Swadner, which is recorded in Liber G.M. No 2 folio 360, in the Court House in Frederick, Maryland, I give it in full as follows:

WILL

I, John Swadner, of Frederick County and State of Maryland, being weak in body, but sound of mind and memory, but calling to mind remberance the uncertainty of this life as touching the disposal of my temporal estate, do make my last will and testament in manner and form following:

It is my will and I order tht after my decease my body be decently buried and the expenses, thereof, and all my other just debts, be fully paid and satisified.

Item - I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Elizabeth, all my estate, both real and personal, during her natural life, and after her decease, it is my will and I order that the whole of my estate, both real and personal, be sold and the money arising from the sale be equally divided among my eleven children - Henry, John, Andrew, Adam, Martin, and daughters Mary, Elizabeth, Polly, Susannah, Catherine, and Eve Swadner, to them, their heirs, and assigns forever. It is my will and order that eighteen (18) pounds currency be deducted from Mary's portion, as she received that sum already.

I constitute, nominate and appoint my beloved wife, Elizabeth, executrix and Philip Ebert, executor of this last will and testament, hereby revoking and disannulling all other wills heretofore made, and the foregoing and no other be taken for my last will and testament.

In testimony, whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this second day of October, one thousand seven hundred and ninety, in the presence of Henry Myanard, Enoch Isenbarg and Johanna S. Etzler.

This will was probated November 11, 1790

Taken from Early Maryland Court House Records

Folio 539-550 dtd Mar 1820 - SWEADNER

John SWEADNER Sr d/ 1794, left will declaring land to be sold and split-up upon his widow's death widow - Elizabeth d/ in Feb 1820
Children (11):
1. Henry & wife Eliza
2. John Jr, dec, & widow Mary
3. Andrew
4. Martin
5. Adam
6. Mary w/o Andrew BUSSARD
7. Elizabeth w/o Henry EBBERT
8. Polly w/o Philip EBBERT
9. Susannah
10. Catharine w/o Joseph SEEKMAN
11. Eve

Also mentioned was David, Jacob, Abraham, Christina and Margaret SWEADNER who appear to be the children of his deceased son, John.

Land - part "Bear Garden", 140 acres; part "Copper Hill", 15 acres; and lot in Liberty. At the time of Elizabeth's death, she and the three youngest children were living on the property.

Land Indenture - John SWEADINGER, Fr Co farmer, purchased from Gabriel EISENBANK (EISENBARK), (wife Mary Eve) also Fr Co farmer, tract "Beargarden", 150 acres on 23 Mar 1769.

Land Indenture - John SWADNER, Fr Co farmer, purchased from Henry MAYNARD Sr, Fr Co farmer, (wife Zephorah) tract "Copper Hill" lying next to "Bear Garden", 16 1/2 acres, for 40 pounda silver or gold on 21 Oct 1782.

Land Indenture - John SWADNER, Fr Co farmer, purchased from John COCHRAN, practitioner of Physics, Lot# 67 in Liberty on draught of Linganore called Piney Run, part of "Dukes Woods" located on the north side of Main Street.

The will of John SWEADNER showed he was weak, written 2 Oct 1790, and probated 6 Nov 1790 with witnesses: Henry MAYNARD Jr, Enoch ISENBERG, and Johannes ETZLER.

Indenture - Andrew BUZZARD & wife Mary of Huntingdon Co, PA sold to Phillip EPPERD & Martin SWEADNER of Fr Co her share for 60 pounds and she signed by mark.

On 15 Apr 1820, Philip EBERT was named trustee and sale was held and property sold to John CLEMSON - 166 1/2 acres @ $65.51/ac and the lot in Liberttytown for $54 totalling $10,961.41 1/2; with 1/11 share $958.59; case closed 17 Jul 1820.
**********************************************************
Equity Records, Liber JS-1 of Frederick County, Maryland, abstracts Liber JS-1 John SWEADNER Sr d/ 1794, left will declaring land to be sold and split-up upon his widow's death widow - Elizabeth d/ in Feb 1820 Children (11): 1. Henry & wife Eliza 2. John Jr, dec, & widow Mary 3. Andrew 4. Martin 5. Adam 6. Mary w/o Andrew BUSSARD 7. Elizabeth w/o Henry EBBERT 8. Polly w/o Philip EBBERT 9. Susannah 10. Catharine w/o Joseph SEEKMAN 11. Eve Also mentioned was David, Jacob, Abraham, Christina and Margaret SWEADNER who appear to be the children of his deceased son, John. Land - part "Bear Garden", 140 acres; part "Copper Hill", 15 acres; and lot in Liberty. At the time of Elizabeth's death, she and the three youngest children were living on the property. Land Indenture - John SWEADINGER, Fr Co farmer, purchased from Gabriel EISENBANK (EISENBARK), (wife Mary Eve) also Fr Co farmer, tract "Beargarden", 150 acres on 23 Mar 1769. Land Indenture - John SWADNER, Fr Co farmer, purchased from Henry MAYNARD Sr, Fr Co farmer, (wife Zephorah) tract Copper Hill lying next to Bear Garden, 16 1/2 acres, for 40 pounda silver or gold on 21 Oct 1782. Land Indenture - John SWADNER, Fr Co farmer, purchased from John COCHRAN, practitioner of Physics, Lot# 67 in Liberty on draught of Linganore called Piney Run, part of "Dukes Woods" located on the north side of Main Street. The will of John SWEADNER showed he was weak, written 2 Oct 1790, and probated 6 Nov 1790 with witnesses: Henry MAYNARD Jr, Enoch ISENBERG, and Johannes ETZLER. Indenture - Andrew BUZZARD & wife Mary of Huntingdon Co, PA sold to Phillip EPPERD & Martin SWEADNER of Fr Co her share for 60 pounds and she signed by mark.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from "In Maryland" by Lillian Isenberg Bahney 1991

By the 1760's there was a well established way in the trek from Berks County, Pennsylvania to Frederick County, Maryland. The route went overland to Marietta, PA, where it crossed the Susquehanna, River, thence to York, PA. From there it followed the stage coach route along the Monancacy River that practically cut through the center of Maryland to the new town of Frederick. Before reaching the town, the Isenbergs turned east. The land that Gabriel Eisenberg was interested in was on the way to the more populated eastern areas of Lord Baltimore's colony. Even after a hundred years, until Lord Baltimore opened the western and northern areas, the populated areas were mainly along the coastal districts. His offer of land, less taxation, freedom of religion and less Indian aggression caused many of the Germans living in Penn's Colony to leave mainly of the Lutheran and the Reformed faith, 2/3 Lutheran and 1/3 Reformed. Nearly always they worshipped together. This is taken from the Charles H. Glatfelter's book, "Pastors and People". He also notes that the Reformed people were greatly influenced by the Brethren in their midst, many going over to that faith.

Here, we would like to reiterate that we have no record of any of the other Eisenbergs who were with Gabriel in Berks County, PA making the trip with him to Maryland, with of course, the exception of his immediate family. We do though, have records that the Haspelhorns, Sweadners/Schwedners, the Smouses, etc went to Maryland in the 1760's and settled in the same area as Gabriel.

The land that Gabriel Eisenberg sought to buy was known as Bare (Bear) Garden. He finally got possession in 1769. The following extracts are from records found in the Frederick Court House.

The name appears first as Gabriel Eisingbark. He bought of Edward Diggs (son of the deceased John Diggs) of St. Mary's County a tract of land of 568 acres on January 18, 1769. He paid 512 pounds, 10 shillings and 10 pence. The name was also spelled in the same deed Eisingburgh. The tract was called Bear Garden and was paid for as follows: cash 125 pounds, 12 shillings, 0 pence half penny by John Sweden (John Swadner) or Sinedinger (to whom Gabriel sold par of the land); cash 314 pounds, 12 shillings, 9 pence, half penny on account of Nicholas Strasburg's bond; cash 118 pounds, 6 shillings and 5 pence.

Note the old family cemetery (now known as the Clemson Family Cemetery) where Gabriel and Maria Eva are buried. Eve's tombstone shows her death year as 1785. Johannis Sweadner, who had come from Berks County, PA, at about the same time as Gabriel, is also buried there, as is Heinrich Schmaus (Henry Smouse), the father of the three girls who married Eisenberg men and who had bee in Greenwich Township, Berks County with Gabriel. The earliest Clemson grave seems to be the marker for a child Elizabeth Clemson, b. 1796, d. 1797.

Will dated 2 Oct 1790 and proved 6 Nov 1790 in Frederick County, Maryland. Wife Elizabeth gets all until her death and then all assets sold and equally divided among eleven children. Buys land in Frederick County 27 Mar 1769 series M folio 129 and 21 Oct 1782 series WG book 3 page 274.

Names in Stone, Vol 2 page 994 lists John Schwedner's gravestone in Clemson Family Cemetery in Clemsonville on Hobbs Farm, west of clemsonville road, 1.3 miles north of New Windsor Road (MD Rt. #31). Park at house and walk down west of stream. 23 names.

CLEMSON FAMILY CEMETERY
on Hobbs farm north of Unionville and near Clemsonville. This graveyard lies against the hill east of the road from which it is visible. Many stones are flat and others must be buried. (Copied 10 DE 1957 by Mary Danner DUDDERAR and the compiler of this work.)
SCHWEDNER, John b 1731 d 20 OC 1790. This is in German and states he was loved by all his servants and friends.
SWEADNER, Martin ?? JY 1811 age 37-11-1

[NI0038] 16th Sig Co (DECCA) RVN


Copied from Herald and News Klamath Falls, OR

Volunteer award goes to Army veteran

Published April. 21, 2004

By MARCIA McGONIGLE

Keith Penman helps because he can.

The 73-year-old retired Army sergeant over the past several years has taken care of veterans, their widows and disaster victims through volunteer work with the Klamath County Veterans Office, Kingsley Field and the American Red Cross.

His volunteerism was recognized Tuesday when the Klamath Falls man was named Klamath Country Volunteer of the Year. He won the honor from a field of 29 volunteers and six organizations nominated.

Penman, along with 10 individuals and two organization finalists, as well as 22 semi-finalists were recognized for efforts to help the community at the 2004 Klamath Country Volunteer of the Year Awards and Recognition Celebration at the Klamath Basin Senior Center.

The other volunteer finalists will be featured in a story in Thursday's Herald and News.

Keith Penman

"I'm really honored by this," Penman said after receiving the award Tuesday. "It's great."

Penman was recommended for the award by Air Force Senior Master Sgt. William J. Lawrie, a retired chairman of the Non Commissioned Officers Association of the United States of America; Sharla Staal-Bishop, Klamath-Lake District manager of the American Red Cross; and by Isabel Rodriquez, service officer at the Klamath County Veterans Service Office.

Last year, Penman, who retired more than 20 years ago as a sergeant first class, helped the veterans office fill its secretarial position with volunteers when state funding was cut. He used his computer experience to order records, download forms and offer suggestions to make the office more efficient, Rodriquez said.

"Without Keith's help, the office would not have survived the cutback," she said.

Penman also serves as a disaster team volunteer with the American Red Cross.

"If your house burns down in the middle of the night and you don't have anywhere to go, you'll probably see Keith," Bishop said. "He'll be there to find a hotel room for you."

The Army retiree also was awarded the Oregon Air National Guard Meritorious Service Award for supervising the Retirees Activities Office of the 173rd Fighter Wing of the Oregon Air National Guard at Kingsley Field.

Penman and his wife, Anne, moved to Klamath Falls in 1978 after 22 years and 9 months with the Army. He has worked as a service manager for Sears and with the Boy Scouts.

He said he volunteers because the need is there.

"I have a lot of knowledge that I'm able to pass on," he said of helping veterans and their families with medical issues. "It makes it rewarding when someone calls on phone the next day to say 'Thanks.' "

He said he was "conned" into volunteering for the Red Cross disaster team, but it is volunteer work he enjoys.

"He just likes to do a good job," said his wife, Anne. "He's a man of integrity. He likes to take on projects and improve them."

The Penmans have four children and 27 grandchildren.

The Klamath Country Volunteer of the Year award and recognition event is organized by the United Way Volunteer Center and sponsored by the United Way of the Klamath Basin, the city of Klamath Falls and Klamath County.

[NI0047] On 16 October 1738, a Johann Mardin Schwedner arrived at the Port of Philadelphia aboard the ship HMS Queen Elizabeth. Departing Rotterdam, via Deal, England the ships master listed this individual as a 51-year-old male, with a seven-year-old son, a wife and daughter. Based on historical background information it would appear that this Johann Mardin Schwedner was a man of means, he must of had money to pay for his passage.

The Master's Log book of the HMS Queen Elizabeth for the year 1738 resides in the Museum of Naval History in London, England and contains information regarding passengers boarding both in Rotterdam and Deal, England. Passengers picked up in Rotterdam were, destitute. They would have been unable to pay for their passage. Passengers boarding at Deal, England, on the other hand, most likely came from a large group of German immigrates who were settle in Ireland several years earlier and had acquired some wealth. These Germans, not liking the heavy hand of their English masters and desiring to join family members who had already immigrated to America, moved on to the new world as soon as they were able. Johann Martin Schwedner/Schwedener could have been one of these.

In 1709, there were 3,000 Germans transported to what is now New York State as indentured servants slated to produce Naval Stores for the British Navy. Of this group of 3,000, 800 died enroute. Twenty-seven of those who survived the journey to New York were Schwedner. Only an Elizabeth Schwedner and a "maiden" were alive in December 1712 on the banks of the Hudson River, 90 miles up-stream from New York. They did not survive the winter of 1712/13. Perhaps Johann Martin Schwedner wanted to join his family. Was he the only Schwedner to survive?

On October 16, 1738, a Johann Martin Schwedener was listed in a group of male individuals who took the Oath of Allegiance at the courthouse in Philadelphia. While the spelling of the names is different from the ship's manifest, there is reason to believe that the two-recorded individuals are one in the same.

Other documents of the period recount how those male individuals who arrived as "free men" (not indentured), and having either paid for their passage prior to boarding the vessel or having friends or family meet them upon arrival at the port to pay their passage were, upon arrival, were given the "Oath of Allegiance".

Had Johann Martin Schwedener or Johann Mardin Schwedner, what ever the spelling, not been able to pay for his passage, he and his family would have been retained on board the ship until an auction could be held to indenture them to individuals willing to pay for their passage. Records held by the Pennsylvania Historical Society in Philadelphia listing those individuals indentured from each ship, show that there is no record to indicate that this individual, either spelling was indentured. Thus, it would appear that Johanne Martin Schwedener/Johann Mardin Schwedner arrived in America and departed Philadelphia as a free and perhaps well to do man.

According to the tax records of Berks County, Greenwich township, Pennsylvania in the year 1754, listed a John Sweedner. These records, "List of Taxables", indicate that this individual was accessed taxes on property owned in Berks County, Greenwich Township, and did in fact pay the taxes due. Now there is no way to determine if this is the John Swadner who settled in Libertytown, Maryland, or if this is the Johann Martin Schwedner who arrived in 1738. Yet, the fact remains and is documented that a majority of those passengers arriving in 1738 settled in South Eastern Pennsylvania.

In addition, what is know is that a mass immigration occurred in the mid to late 1750's from the southeastern portion of Pennsylvania, which includes Berks County to Northern Maryland along the road which lead to Virginia, a newly opened territory for settlers. Libertytown, Frederick County, Maryland lays next to this route of travel. There are no records, to date, that would indicate that John Sweedner remained in Berks County after 1754.

Around 1754 John Schwedner/Swadner and his wife Elizabeth arrived and settled in Libertytown, Maryland. From court documents John Swadner purchase several large pieces of property in and around Libertyown, including lot # 67 upon which a house was built and which appears to have remained in the family since its construction except for a brief period after Elizabeth's death (see notes). Moreover, he paid in cash. John had money.

John and Elizabeth Swadner, according to church records, gave birth and raised five sons, Henry (1757), John (1759), Andrew (1761), Adam (1763), Martin (1765) and six daughters Mary (1763), Elizabeth (1769, Polly (1771), Susanna (1773), Catherine (1775), and Eve (1776). These children were all baptized as Schwedner.

The eldest son, Henry, baptized Heinrich Schwedner, later in life change the spelling to Sweadner. Henry, some time after his mother's death in 1820 re-acquired the property and house on lot # 67 in Libertytown, Maryland. Built before 1764, the house is still standing and has been the residence of his descendants for the past 234 years. GARETH DUVAL SWEADNER, 2ND Great Grandson of Henry, his wife Maria, daughter Kelle, and son Jason is the fifth and sixth generations of Sweadners to live in this bit of family history.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Following is an additional note supplied by
Don Berkebile of Mercersburg, PA

Just as the preparation of the Isenberg history reaches the final stages for publication, one more effort has been made to identify
and document the parents of Gabriel the immigrant, and to identify his wife Maria Eva. Recently a highly experienced and competent
researcher has been encountered, Mrs. Beverly Tubbs, of Morrison, Oklahoma, and she was engaged to work on our problem, with
the hope that she might succeed where others have failed. While a massive and heroic effort was put forth, the problems still remain
unresolved, yet the knowledge gained may be of sufficient import to justify inclusion here. Some of the data found is suggestive, and
additionally, the disclosure of the material covered may inspire others to find something that has been missed.

First, it can be said that Mrs. Tubbs is in agreement with the German researcher, Mrs. Ewald-Jahr, in the belief that Enoch, born in
1689, is the father of Gabriel and Simon. It is doubly unfortunate that this cannot yet be documented, and that the Isenbergs have
thus far not been found on any ship's passenger lists. Mrs. Tubbs believed that the Enoch gound in Rockland Township is the 1689
Enoch, and the father of Gabriel and Simon, although she questions whether Nicholas is an Isenberg at all (yet it must be
remembered that the father of the 1689 Enoch, was named Nicholas). It is found in Pennsylvania records that the speeling of
Nicholas' name is consistently Ironman/Eisman, etc and never with the berg ending. Further it is found that the names of Hans Georg
Issseman, Ja Nicklas Isseman, Petder Eisenmann, Sr., and Petder Eisenmann, Jr. are found on a 1749 passenger list, and it is
thought that this Nicklas may be the one we are finding in Berks County in the 1750's and later.

Little data survives on which to judge Enoch, but the fact that he was the first to purchase land, in 1743 (this land was not sold by
Enoch's heirs until 1790), suggests that he may have been the eldest, or the 1689 Enoch. Also he does not appear as a sponsor at any
christenings for the Isenberg births that started in the late 1740's, so he may have been dead by that time. Neither does he appear
on any tax lists, which start in 1753. Insufficient data has been found on this estate to prove his family, for no probate papers have
been found pertaining to Enoch.

It has long been puzzling and frustrating that the documentation for the marriage of Gabriel to Maria Eva cannot be found. Several of
the Isenberg researchers, noting the apparent intimacy of the Isenberg and Schwedner families in both Pennsylvania and Maryland,
have long believed that Maria Eva was a Schwedner. Only one farm lay between that of Gabriel and Marin Schwedner in Greenwich
Township, and it was thought that perhaps Gabriel married a neighbor. Martin died there in 1757, but when Gabriel later bought land
in Maryland, he immediately sold part of ti to Martin's son, John, so the families continued as neighbors in a new area. John
Schwedner also named a daughter Eva, which is suggestive, but not convincing. Now however, we find evidence that this theory is
probably incorrect, for estate papers of Martin Schwedner (April 1757), and later his widow, Anna Maria (Sept 1757) suggest that
there were only two children, John and Anna Maria, who married Peter Haak. Further, no Isenberg or Schwedner has ever been
found who sponsored a child for the other family. It is a common custom that sponsors are often relatives, yet the variety of
surnames seen among the Isenberg sponsors makes us wonder if these folks are all relatives, or perhaps only close friends (Christ,
Faust, Graff, Rebenbuler and Breidman) While the Schwedner theory for Maria Eva's origins seems unlikely at this point, the
possibility still exists of a relationship between the families. If the 1689 Enoch does prove to be Gabriel's father, it is possible that
Gabriel's mother, and not his wife, was a Schwedner, for Enoch's wife remains unidentified.

During the initial part of her work, Mrs. Tubbs suggested that Maria Eva might have been a Bieber/Beaver. First she noticed that
down in Rockland Township, the farm next to Enoch belonged to John Biebers. Later, up in Greenwich Township, Gabriel's next door
neighbor was Lawrence Bieber, believed to be the son of John. Gabriel's land had been purchased from Sarah Beverin (in German
usage, "in" was sometimes added to a surname to denote female). It is not known who Sarah was, except that she had a son, George,
but is has not thus far been possible to properly assemble these Bieber folks into a meaningful family. Finally, in 1754, Gabriel and
Maria Eva sponsored a child for Lawrence Bieber and wife - a daughter named Maria Eva. Possibly future research will establish any
relationship between the Isenbergs and Biebers.

Still another possibility exists for Maria Eva. In 1747 her first child John George, was sponsored by John George Christ, and in other
matter too, the Christ name is found associated with the Isenbergs. The family of Hendrick Christen is found on a 1732 passenger
list, although no ages are given. Among his daughters are both a Maria and an Eva. This family is later found in Maxatawny Township,
which is between Greenwich and Rockland Townships.

Mrs. Tubbs continues her research on this problem, but since Mrs. Bahney's work is now ready for publication, we can only include
this statement of findings, rather than the conclusion we had hoped for. In desperation, Mrs. Tubbs, is also searching the records of
any family known to have been a neighbor or on intimate terms with the Isenbergs, in hope that some reference to Maria Eva
Isenberg will be found. Records thus far searcher for Eisenberg and related names include: for Philadelphia County, PA, Wills
Administrations, Orphans Courts, Deed Grantors, Court Partition Deeds, Warrants, Surveys and Patents; For Berks County, PA,
Warrants, Taxation and Exoneration Lists, Deed Grantors, Willls, Administrations, and Bonds.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

"Johann Henrich Silvius," as he was listed on the passenger list for the ship Queen Elizabeth, arrived after 9 September 1738 at Philadelphia, 106 men qualifying 16 September. He was listed as age 25.

The ship, Queen Elizabeth, operated by or for the major shipping firm of Hope, left Rotterdam, Holland, on June 22, 1738, and headed for the English port of Deal, England, for the customs clearance required by the Navigation Acts. The ship's captain was Alexander Hope. The ship apparently spent three to five weeks at sea due to a violent storm before reaching Deal, a trip that could take as little as eight days and in some cases two. From Deal, the trip to Philadelphia was generally about eight to twelve weeks.

In this year of 1738, it was said that of more than 15 ships to have arrived in Philadelphia, about 2,000 people died enroute of illness. Henry was very lucky to have made it to America alive. But if he didn't arrive healthy, he would have had to have remained on the ship, and the ship would have had to anchor a mile down from the city on the Delaware River, quarantined. But did he have any money left over after the long trip down the Rhine and through the many ports of inspection before reaching Rotterdam? If he didn't, he would have had to sign a contract with the captain of the Queen Elizabeth to pay his fare within a certain amount of time after arrival. If, when he arrived in Philadelphia he had no funds to pay the fare (either by his own money or money from a relative already in America), he would have had to wait until his debt was paid by a local merchant--he would then be an indentured servant for three to six years or more.

It is a family story passed down from generations past that Henry worked for a family in Germantown as an indentured servant.

Click here to see the Queen Elizabeth's passenger list thanks to the GenHome web site--an interesting site with other interesting and useful information. Click here to see a copy of Johann Henrich's signature. For a couple of drawings of ships of the time period, click here. And, click here for further information about leaving the Palatine in 1738. A portion of Gottlieb Mittelberger's diary of his 1750 and 1754 voyages to America and back to Germany again.

If you find you are descended from one of the Silvius immigrants, the SilviusWave e-mail list, SILVIUS-L, is available.

To subscribe, send an e-mail to:

SILVIUS-L-request@rootsweb.com, with the word subscribe in the body of tthe e-mail.

After subscribing, to send a query, address the e-mail message to SILVIUS-L@rootsweb.com

Click here to search the Archives of the SILVIUS-L Type in our list name and next choose the search query and the year to search.

[NI0073] The Germany of the 1700s consisted of nearly three hundred territories, duchies, city-states and cantons linked together by language, custom and their common Germanic ethnicity. The Electoral Palatinate (i.e. the Kurpfalz) was one of the larger territories. It encompassed the region on both sides of the Rhine River and it tributaries, the Main and Neckar Rivers. At the present time the Rheinland-Pfalz is known as the Palatinate, and it lies entirely on the west side of the Rhine. The region to the east of the Rhine, the Neckar Valley, is now known as Baden-Wurttemberg. The German emigrants of the 1700s came primarily from the Palatinate territories located along the Rhine River (i.e. in the southern part of western Germany and the northern part of Switzerland). The greatest number of emigrants came from the Dutcs/districts of Zweibrucken, Darmstadt, Hesse-Darmstadt, Hanau, Franconia, Spires, Worms, Nassau, Alsace, Baden and Wurttemberg and the
Archbishoprics of Treves and Mayence. The region lying to the east of the Rhine and south of the Neckar, between the Schwarzwald (i.e. the Black Forest) and the Odenwald (i.e. Oden Forest) was known during the Middle Ages as the Kraichgau, and from that region came a large number of emigrants.

The Peace of Augsburg of 1555 gave the sovereign over a village or territory the privilege of choosing the religious preference for the people who resided there. The majority of the Palatinate became Lutheran in 1556, but the villages governed by the Bishopric of Speyer remained Catholic. By the 1560s the Reformed Church had come to the Palatinate; it supplanted Lutheranism as the dominant faith. Then, during the Thirty Years War, Catholicism once more became the predominant faith in the Palatinate. In 1705 the "Palatine Church Division"
was effected. The terms of the "Division" included a ruling that 5/7ths of the parishes in the Palatinate were to be Reformed; 2/7ths were to be Catholic; none were to be Lutheran.

Religious persecution is the reason often cited for the emigration of thousands of Germans. That idea seems to simply be a minterpretation of the "religious persecution" reason for the emigration of British subjects hoping to avoid the Church of England. In terms of the German and Swiss emigrants, religious persecution was only one small aspect of the grand migration. In fact, it might be argued that it was more
difficult for Germans and Swiss to obtain permission to emigrate on grounds of religious persecution than any other.

In 1688 King Louis XIV of France sent a large army into the Palatinate to take it into the possession of France. Two years earlier King Leopold I, the Holy Roman Emperor entered into an alliance with a number of German princes, and the kings of Holland, Sweden and Spain to preserve the Holy Roman Empire against a possible French attack. Ties between the royal families of Holland and England induced England to join the League of Augsburg. The League of Augsburg was therefore ready to meet Louis' army when it arrived in the Rhine Valley in 1688. The War of the League of Augsburg lasted for roughly seven years from 1689 to 1697. It spread to the North American Continent where it became known as King William's War.

The War of the Spanish Succession was felt in the Palatinate when, in 1707, a French army under Marshal Villars crossed the Rhine and plundered throughout the region which is today southwestern Germany.

The hardships wrought by the Thirty Years’ War and then the subsequent War of the League of Augsburg, along with certain natural causes figured more prominently than religious persecution as causative factors of the migration of Germans and Swiss to America. John Duncan Brite in his dissertation, The Attitude Of European States Toward Emigration To The American Colonies, 1607-1820, noted that there were a series of crop failures throughout the territories occupied by Wurttemberg and Pfalz-Rhineland. Hardest hit were the fruit orchards and vinyards, due to the extreme cold of the winter of 1708/1709. Devastatingly cold weather hit Germany and the rest of western Europe. Extreme cold set in as early as October. By November, 1708 it was said that firewood would not burn in the open air and that alcohol froze. The rivers, including the swift flowing Rhone, became covered with ice that permitted carts to be driven across them. At about the same time, restrictions were placed on grazing and wood gathering in the ducal forests of the Palatinate. Increased taxes added to the hardships of survival faced by the working classes.

The greatest motivation for the mass emigration of Palatines appears not to have been religious persecution, war devastation, crop failures or even taxes. Enticement was probably the greatest encouragement for the emigration of the majority of the Germans and Swiss. That enticement came from two sources: 1.) propaganda spread by Neulanders, and 2.) letters from prior emigrants.

William Penn was given a grant of land by King Charles II of England in 1681 as payment of a loan made by William's father. Charles probably found it beneficial to get rid of Penn because he was a loud exponent of his Quaker faith. That faith, among a few others, threatened the power of the Church of England. By granting Penn the land in the New World, Charles would succeed in repaying the debt (without spending money which his government budget could not easily afford). Also, it would remove the bothersome Quaker group from his country. It would be assumed that the Quakers found the deal to be most satisfactory because they simply wanted to be able to practice their religious beliefs as they wished; their intentions had not been to provoke the troubles that they found themselves constantly in.

The British government expected the proprietors of colonies in the New World to populate those colonies in order to confirm the British claims to the land. William Penn, therefore, set about publicizing the plans for his "Holy Experiment". It would be a self-governing state with the separation of Church and State an integral part of the government's foundation. William Penn called for any and all interested persons to make the trip across the ocean to settle in his granted lands. A pamphlet was printed in England and distributed throughout the
Palatine. Titled: Some account of the Province of Pennsylvania in America, the pamphlet published William Penn's offer to sell one hundred acres of land in exchange for £2. Penn's pamphlet also offered equal rights to all persons regardless of religion or race. Various other books and pamphlets were published and distributed throughout the Rhine valley during the next two decades, including Daniel Falckner's Curieuse Nachricht von Pennsylvania (i.e. Curious News From Pennsylvania).

Records do not reveal any mass migrations as a direct result of Penn's pamphlet campaign in Germany, but some families did take him up on the promise of a better life in the New World. Although the first major emigration of Germans would not occur until 1709, the names of sixty-four German men, heads of their households, were included on a listing made in 1691 of the residents of German Town in Pennsylvania.

[NI0074] The earliest emigration of Germans and Swiss from their homelands to the New World was that of a party led by Francis Daniel Pastorius in the year 1683. Enticed by William Penn's invitation to his province, the party settled near the young town of Philadelphia. The German settlement was appropriately named "Germantown".

Twenty-five years would pass between the emigration of the Pastorius party and the next significant mass departure. In 1708 the Reverend Joshua Kocherthal assembled a party of forty-one adults and their children and prepared to emigrate to the Carolinas; they had been enticed by the advertisements published by the proprietary governor of the Carolina colony. In order to settle in any of the British colonies, Kocherthal had to submit a request to Queen Anne. The party traveled to London in the Spring of 1708 to secure the royal permission and was confronted by the usual governmental red-tape. Reverend Kocherthal had to provide a justification for the emigration; the reason given was the French ravages in the Rhine and Neckar Valleys in 1707. The Germans' petition was submitted to the Board of Trade. The Board of Trade suggested that the Germans should be settled in Antigua. Upon the opinion that the Palatines would not be suited to the hot climate of the West Indies it was then suggested that they be directed to the Hudson River Valley of the Province of New York. The Germans would therefore be available to assist the English on the frontier against the French and the Indians.

By the time that the Germans actually embarked for the New World in October, the original party of forty-one had been increased by the addition of fourteen more emigrants. One family had to remain behind because of the mother's illness. En route, two children were born.

The Kocherthal party arrived at Long Island on 18 December, 1708. They were granted lands along the west side of the Hudson River about fifty-five miles north of New York City. Their settlement developed into the town of Newburgh. Almost from the start, the Germans suffered from want of provisions. A proposed naval stores industry, by which the Germans would be gainfully employed, never materialized. The Reverend Kocherthal returned to England to petition the Queen for additional monetary assistance. He hoped to raise the funds necessary to establish vinyards in the new settlement. Although not able to raise the exact amount that he hoped for, the Reverend Kocherthal succeeded in obtaining some funds, and the Newburgh settlement survived and flourished. The success of the Newburgh settlement is important to the history of German emigration because it paved a favorable path through the English government for subsequent emigrants. If the settlement had failed, the English might not have been so eager to provide assistance to future German settlement schemes.

Other German families were excited by the news of the success of the Newburgh Palatines, as Kocherthal's party of emigrants became known. They were also enticed by the suggestion made by Kocherthal in the third edition of his pamphlet, Aussfuhrlich und umstandlicher Bericht von der beruhmten Landschafft Carolina, that because the English government had provided their party with monetary assistance, perhaps it would likewise provide for other emigrants.

German and Swiss families from the Rhine and Neckar Valleys began to pack up their belongings and traveled north toward the the ports of the Netherlands. A dispatch from James Dayrolle, the British Resident at the Hague, dated 24 December, 1708 included a letter from an unknown person which stated that:

"There arrived in this place a number of Protestant families, traveling to England in order to go to the English colonies in America. There are now in the neighborhood of Rotterdam almost eight or nine hundred of them, having difficulty with the packet boat and convoys."

Although the letter exaggerated the number of emigrants (i.e. the number would not reach nine hundred until some three months later), it was prophetic. During 1709 approximately 13,500 German and Swiss emigrants would apply for passage to the English colonies.

Troops were being ferried on transport ships from England to the Low Countries to fight against the French in the War of the Spanish Succession. Dayrolle negotiated with the Duke of Marlborough to allow the Palatines to be conveyed to England on the return trip of the transport ships. Eight hundred and fifty-two Germans were carried to London in April, 1709. Shortly thereafter, word was received in Rotterdam that the Elector Palatine had issued an edict forbidding the German emigrants from leaving their homeland. A number of persons were imprisoned after they were captured making their way down the Rhine. But the edict and the show of force did little to deter the mass exodus of the Palatines. They traveled by land toward the seaports of the Netherlands.

Queen Anne, through the intercession of the Duke of Marlborough, had agreed to allow the nine hundred or so emigrants to be transported to England. The English government even paid for the transport of the refugees from Rotterdam. In May, when an additional two thousand had arrived at Rotterdam, Dayrolle again requested Marlborough's intercession on their behalf. A second transport was agreed to. But as the German emigrants continued to arrive in Rotterdam, the English hospitality began to strain and break down. The English Secretary of State, Henry Boyle, wrote to Dayrolle on the 24th of June instructing him to send over to London only those Palatines who were then actually in the Netherlands. All others on their way were to be turned back. Dayrolle had advertisements published in the Gazette of Cologne warning that no more Palatines would be given passage to England. The hospitality of the Dutch authorities at Rotterdam was also becoming very strained. They appealed for help from the States General at the Hague. The Dutch ministers at Cologne and Frankfurt were informed to do what they could to stop the flow of emigrants. All the efforts by the English and Dutch authorities were to no avail; the proprietors of the Carolinas had sent over pamphlets and circulars titled: Propositions of the Lord Proprietors of Carolina to encourage the Transporting of Palatines to the Province of Caroline. The missives promised, among other things, one hundred acres of land for every man, woman and child, free of quit-rent for ten years. The Palatines, enticed by the promise of a better life in the American colonies, poured like a giant wave toward the Netherlands and England.

Thirteen thousand and five hundred Palatines arrived in London between May and October, but the authorities there sent back 2,257 because they were Roman Catholic. The emigrants were initially given shelter throughout London under the assumption that they would soon embark for the American colonies. But arrangements for such a large number had not been made, and the temporary lodging became an extended encampment. As the days and weeks wore on, the patience of the English people wore out. The Palatine encampments were attacked on more than one occasion by mobs of armed Englishmen.

Until such time that a plan could be devised to handle the logistics of transporting the thousands of German and Swiss emigrants across the Atlantic Ocean, short range plans were discussed to settle them in the British Isles. The plans included settlement of the emigrants in Wales where they could be put to work in the silver and copper mines. Of the various proposals considered by the English authorities, one that was finally agreed upon was proposed by the Council of Ireland. The Council hoped that the settlement of the Palatines there would strengthen the Protestant presence in the largely Catholic island. Over three thousand Palatines made new homes in Ireland between September, 1709 and January, 1710.

Despite troubles with the Irish Catholics who were understandably upset about the colonization of their homeland, the Palatines flourished in their new settlements. Over time they intermarried with their Irish neighbors to the extent that their "Germanic" origins were nearly forgotten.

[NI0081] Copied from the funeral service at Mary Ann McGuire.

In memory of Mary Ann McGuire. Date of birth, April 12, 1921 in Hang, Minnesota. Date of death, November 19, 1994 in Vancouver, Washington. Mass of Christian burial, St. Lawrence Catholic Church, Raymond, Pacific County, Washington, Tuesday, November 20 2, 1994 11 a.m.. Celebrant: the Reverend Father Gallagher. Casket bearers: Tom McGuire, John McGuire, Mike McGuire, Gary Marconi, Byron Swadener, and Paul Hoseney. The final resting place, Fern Hill Cemetery, Menlo, Pacific County, Washington.

[NI0082] Copied from Ohio Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death
Document provided to author by Jeanne Yoakam.

Reg. Dist No.42
PrimaryReg. Dist. No.4200
State File No.058308
Registrar's No.281

1.Decedent - Name:Harley Swadener
2.Sex:Male
3.Date of Death:July 19, 1980
4.Race:White
5(a)Age-last birthday:90
6.Date of Birth:March 24, 1890
7.(a)County of Death:Knox
(b)City , village, or location of Death:Mount Vernon
(c)Hospital or other Institution:Country Court Convalescent Center
(d)If Hospital or Institution:inpaitent
8.(a)State of Birth:Pennsylvania
(b)Citizen of What Country:USA
9.Country or Descent:American
10:Social Security Number:281-01-0787
11.Was Deceased ever in U.S. Armed Forces:No
12.(a)Married, Never Married, Widowed, Divorced:Widowed
(b)Surviving Spouse:(Blank)
13.(a)Usual occupationSupervisor
(b)Kind of Busines or Industry:Dairy
14.(a)Residence - StateOhio
(b)CountyKnox
(c)City, Village, or LocationMt. Vernon
(d)Street and number202 West Chestnut Street
(e)Inside City LimitsYes
15.Father - NameFrank Swadener
16.Mother - NameLillian Hamilton
17.(a)Informat - NamePhyliss Kinnard
(b)Mailing address93 Columbus Road, Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050
18.Death was Caused By:(a)Coordination Collapse
(b)Dehydrates and Electrolite Imbalance
Approximate interval between onset and death:hours
19.Part II, Other Significant Contions:N/A
20.
21.To be completed by Attending Physican:
(a)Signature:J. T. Tidyman, MD
(b)Date Signed:July 20, 1947
(c)Hour of death:2:00 PM
22.To be completed by Coroner Ony:
This section left blank
23.Name and address of Certifier (Physician or Corner:Dr. J. T. Tidyman, Main Street, Bellvile, Ohio 43050
24.Burial, Cremation(a)Burial
Date:(b)July 22, 1980
Name of Cemetery or Crematory:(c)Bellville Cemetery
Location(d)Bellville, Ohio
25.Name of Embalmer:John T. DilleyLic. No.6250A
26.Funeral Director's Signature:John T. Dilley
27.Funeral Firm and Address:North-Dilley Funeral Home, 212 North Main Street, Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050
28.Date Rec'd by Local Reg.July 24, 1980
29.Registrar's Signature:Peggy J. Stewart
30.Date Permit Issued:July 19, 1980
31.Signature of Person Issuing Permit:Same

[NI0085] Polar Bear Expedition Digital Collections
Swadener, Hoy E.
Personal Data
alternate spellings: Swadener, Roy E.
rank: Cook
company: United States. Army. Infantry, 339th. Company A.
hometown: Detroit (Mich.)
awards/medals: Citation Order #8
sources: Hugh D. McPhail papers, 1918-1957
The romance of Company "A", 339th infantry, A. N. R. E. F.

Note: Hoy E. Swadener was a a member of this Army Unit sent to Eastern Russia during World War I. Little is know of his military service and there is nothing in this collection that makes reference to him except for the fact that he was a cook assigned to Company A. However, this collection does give a place to start.

Hugh D. McPhail papers
Biography

Resident of Petoskey, Mich., served as 2d lieutenant, Co. A, 339th Infantry.

Scope and content

The collection includes two scrapbooks containing a letter, Nov. 16, 1919, of Theodore R. McPhail, describing the 339th Infantry's homecoming parade in Detroit, poems, and newspaper clippings relating to the fighting in Russia, the mutiny of March 1919, the return of the 339th Infantry to Detroit, the return of the bodies of men killed in Russia, and later Polar Bear activities. Also included are rosters, certificates of promotion, lists of citations, and lists of casualties for Co. A, a cartoon by "Bug" Culver, a map of the Archangel area with areas of operations marked, lists of the bodies returned in 1929, and a receipt book of Captain Otto Odjard

[NI0087] Copied from Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, Certificate of Death
Document obtained and provided to Author by Jeanne Yoakam.

Reg. Dist. No. 1113
State File No. 273333
Primary Reg. Dist. No. 5701
Registrar No. 192

1. Place of Death: (a) County Richland
(b) Madison Twp
(c) Name of hospital or institution: Mansfield Sanitarium Hospital
(d) Length of stay: in hosptial or institution 3 days
In this community Lifetime

2. Usual Residence of Deceased:(a) State Ohio
(b) CountyRichland
(c) City or villageRural
(d) Street No.Jefferson Twp
(e) If foreign born, how long in U.S.AN/A

3. Full Name:John B. Swadener(a) if veteran N/A
(b) Social Security No.N/A
4. Sex:Male
5. Color or Race:White
6. (a)Single, widowed, married, divorced:married
(b)Name of husband or wife:Belle Swadener
(c)Age of husband or wife if alive:N/A
7. Birth date of deceased:October 7, 1865
8. Age:Years: 81Months: 5Days: 25If less than on day:N/A
9. Birthplace:Richland County, Ohio
10. Usual occupation:Farmer
11.Industry or Business:
12.Name of father:Joseph Swadener
13.Birthplace of father:Ohio
14.Name of mother:Maria Bean
15.Birthplace of mother:Maine
16.(a)Informat's Signature:Carl Swadener
(b)Address:Bellville, Ohio
17.(a)Burial, cremation, or other:
(b)Date:April 4,1947
(c)Place:Middleburg Knox A (?) O (?)
(d)Name Of Emblamer:Ora O. Snyder
Lic. No.3497-A
18.(a)Signature of Funeral Director:Marion L. Snyder
Lic. No.3532
(b)AddressBellville, Ohio
19.(a)Date received local registrar:April 3, 1947
(b)Registrar's signatureMartha A. McFarland
20.Medical Certification
Date of death:Month:Aprilday:2Year:1947hour:8:15Minute:AM
21.I hereby certify that I attended the decease from March 30, 1947 to April 2, 1947; that I last saw him alive on April 1, 1947 and that death occurred on the date and hour stated above.
Immediate cause of death:Cerebal Hemorrhage
Due to:Arterioscherotic cardivascular disease
22.If death was due to external causes, fill in the following:
(a)Accident, suicide, or homicide (specify):N/A
(b)Date of occurrence:N/A
(c)Where did injury occur?N/A
(d)Did injury occur in or about home, on farm, in industial place, in public place?N/A
23.Signature:Elizabeth Reedman, MD
Address:Butler, Ohio
Date Signed:April 2, 1947



[NI0088] The following was written by Evans (Grace Radcliff Evans)

Henry Sweadner married Elizabeth Sensor 6-27-1786. This record is in the Court House in Frederick (Frederick County, Maryland). In the Old German records of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Frederick (which records are preserved in the vault of the Frederick County National Bank) is the following record, which is evidently that of the above couple, although the day of the month is differs: Heinnrich Schwedner married 6-4-1786, to Elizabeth Sentzer.

After a diligent search, the only record of Henry Sweadner was the record of the transfer of his property, in his old age, to two of his sons, Daniel and Jacob Sweadner. This is bill No. 1079, recorded in Equity Record J. S., Folio 100 in the Court House in Frederick. This bill contains a list of all his children, who were living at the time, and the names and residences of his sons-in-law. Filed 10-6-1830

Cousin John Sweadner of Liberty says that this Henry Sweadner, who was his grandfather, was buried on his cousin John's Farm, just west of Liberty. It was in what was called "Hart's Burying Ground", which was on this farm, but it has all been plowed over for many years, and there is no sign of a graveyard ever having been there. This old burying ground was on the north side of the pike about one-half mile west of Libertytown, and not far from the present little beautiful cemetery.

The births of these 10 children and the death of Upton are recorded in an old German Bible, which was published in 1760 and is now in possession of cousin Taylor Sweadner in Libertytown. Names of parents and marriage records not given in this list.

IGI (Ancestor Search)

Henrich SCHWEDNER Sex: M Marriage(s): Spouse: Elisabeth SENTZER, Marriage: 27 Jun 1786, Evangelical Lutheran Church, Frederick, Frederick, Maryland
Source Information: Batch number: M504181 Dates: 1743-1811 Source Call No. 0824392 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No. 0883763
___________________________________________________________________________________
From: mdfreder-bounces@rootsweb.comm
[mailto:mdfreder-bounces@rootsweb.com]On Behalf Of Dorinda Shepleyy
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 11:50 AM
To: MDFREDER@rootsweb.comm
Subject: [MDFR] JS-11, 100-109 - SWEADNER, JONES, HIMES/KIMES

Frederick Co, Maryland - Equity Court Abstracts - JS-11

100-109 - SWEADNER, JONES, HIMES/KIMES - Oct 1830

Daniel SWEADNER vs Heirs of Henry SWEADNER - Foreclosure

Henry SWEADNER d/ 1828 intestate,leaving 9 heirs,

- Jacob SWEADNER - Ohio
- Henry SWEADNER - Ohio
- Betsy w/o Samuel HIMES/KIMES - Ohio
- Polly w/o Thomas JONES - Ohio
- David SWEADNER
- William SWEADNER
- Basil SWEADNER
- Upton SWEADNER
- Daniel SWEADNER

(It was not stated whether the heirs were his children or his siblings; since it didn't state he died without issue, am assuming they are his children.)

Land - "Duke's Woods" in Liberty Town, from Conrad DUDDERER in 1796 (previously to Dudderer from John COCHRON; - Lot #25 on Piney Run, a draught on the Linganore, in the town of Liberty.

Henry was indebted to Daniel and David SWEADNER by mortgage. Trustee was Daniel SWEADNER; sale made to William SWEADNER at $950; proceeds short; finalized 19 Jul 1832.
==============
- Dorinda Shepley
MidMdRoots.com




[NI0090] As told by James L. Swadener

My great-grandfather Abraham, son of Jacob Sweadner, was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, in either 1826 or 1827, moved to Greene County, Ohio when he was a "good-sixed boy", tto live with relatives, where he married Sarah Confer October 26, 1847. Later they moved to Indiana.

[NI0091] Adam and Eva where married at the German Reformed Church of the City of Frederick, Frederick County, Maryland. Witnesses: David Lehman, Margaret Adam. Married by William Runcker. Taken from the Parish Register: 1756 -1885.

Copied from the History of Beaver Creek Township, Greene County, Ohio, page 585.
Submitted by Jeanne Yoakam

"In 1810 Adam Swadner came from Maryland, and entered one hundred and fifty acres of land in section 16 (3.7.), and built the present residence of his son, Jacob Swadner. He was granted this land to put on it, consisting of the log house now occupied by Jacob Swadner, and a log barn. He was a shoe-maker and general mechanic, thus making himself useful in the new settlement."

[NI0092] The Rocky Hill Church record says that Martin Schwedtner was confirmed in 1793

[NI0096] Susannah Schwedtner was confirmed at Rocky Hill Reformed Church 1796

[NI0098] Eve Schewdtner was confirmed in 1799 at Rocky Hill Reformed Church

[NI0100] From: mdfreder-bounces@rootsweb.comm
[mailto:mdfreder-bounces@rootsweb.com]On Behalf Of Dorinda Shepleyy
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 11:50 AM
To: MDFREDER@rootsweb.comm
Subject: [MDFR] JS-11, 100-109 - SWEADNER, JONES, HIMES/KIMES

Frederick Co, Maryland - Equity Court Abstracts - JS-11

100-109 - SWEADNER, JONES, HIMES/KIMES - Oct 1830

Daniel SWEADNER vs Heirs of Henry SWEADNER - Foreclosure

Henry SWEADNER d/ 1828 intestate,leaving 9 heirs,

- Jacob SWEADNER - Ohio
- Henry SWEADNER - Ohio
- Betsy w/o Samuel HIMES/KIMES - Ohio
- Polly w/o Thomas JONES - Ohio
- David SWEADNER
- William SWEADNER
- Basil SWEADNER
- Upton SWEADNER
- Daniel SWEADNER


(It was not stated whether the heirs were his children or his siblings; since it didn't state he died without issue, am assuming they are his children.)

Land - "Duke's Woods" in Liberty Town, from Conrad DUDDERER in 1796 (previously to Dudderer from John COCHRON; - Lot #25 on Piney Run, a draught on the Linganore, in the town of Liberty.

Henry was indebted to Daniel and David SWEADNER by mortgage. Trustee was Daniel SWEADNER; sale made to William SWEADNER at $950; proceeds short; finalized 19 Jul 1832.
==============
- Dorinda Shepley
MidMdRoots.com

[NI0101] From the Grace Radcliff Evans Report.

Jacob must have lived in Franklin County, PA., as I have been told by his son Abraham, was born there. Could find no further trace of him, although, probably the records are in PA., If I could had access to them. Have been told there was a large family of these children, but only know names of these two: Abraham and Valentine

[NI0102] The younger sister of Jacob Adam Lehman

[NI0103] Marie A. Knott of Hillsboro, Ohio, a fifth great granddaughter of John Swadner, a sixth cousin to me, has provided a copy of a hand written legal document to which the ownership of a Richard, a boy negro slave, is transferred from Philip Ebbert, husband of Mary Swadner (daughter of John Swadner) to their daughter Catherine. Catherine, at the time (1826) is married to a Daniel Baumgardner.

Marlene and I spent some the better part of an evening trying to transcribe the hand written document, below is the results of our labors. Words that we could not make out are listed as (blank) and the transcription is, hopefully, correct.

John Swadner arrived in Libertytown, Maryland in 1754, purchased several pieces of property which included indentured servants and most likely more than one slave. So, it would appear that our ancestors were Slave owners, which would have been a common practice during this period of America history.

The Indenture Document

This Indenture made this first --- day of June, in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred (and) twentysix, between Philip Ebbert of Frederick County & State of Maryland of the one part and Catherine Baumgardner, daughter of the said Philip Ebbert, of the county & State Afores of the other part, Witnesseth that the said Philip Ebbert as well for and in consideration of the natural love and affection which he the said Philip Ebbert hath and beareth unto the said Catherine Baumgardner, as also for the better maintainence, support, livelihood and preferment of the said Catherine Baumgardner, hath given, granted, alined, enfeoffed and enfirmed and by these presents doth give, grant, allow, enfeoff, and confirm unto the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigned, that negro boy named Richard for term of years, being the same boy, Richard purchased by the said Philip Ebbert for a term of years, and willed by a certain Brico Burgefs to be free after serving such term, as referenced to the said will. Will more fully show, together (blank) all the advantaged emoluments, services and profits of the said boy Richard for such term of years as may or is specified or set forth in the will of the said Brico Burgefs aforesaid, and all the right, title, interest, claim, and demand whatsoever of him the said Philip Ebbert of in and to the said boy Richard. To have and to hold the said boy Richard for such time as specified and set forth in the said will of aforesaid and hereby granted and confirmed or mentioned intended so to be unto the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigned for the only proper use and benefit and behoof of her the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigns for such time as stated in the will of aforesaid; and the said Philip Ebbert for himself, his heirs, ancestors and administrators doth covenant, grant and agree to bind with the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigns by these presents, that she the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigns shall and fully may, from time to time, and at all times hereafter, peaceably and quietly (blank), hold, use, occupy, and pofsefs the said negro boy Richard, for such term as (blank), hereby granted and confirmed, or mentioned or intended to be hereby granted or confirmed, free, clear, and fully discharged, or well and sufficiently saved, kept (blank) and indemnified, of, from, and against, all former and other, gifts, grants, gains, sales, jointures, feoffments, dowers, estates, entails, rents, rent charges, arrears of rents, judgements, esceautions, and of, from and against, all former and other (blank), troubles, charges and incumbrances whatsoever, had done or suffered, or had, made, done or suffered by him the said Philip Ebbert his heirs or afsigns (blank) other person or persons, lawfully claiming or to claim, by, from, or under him, (blank) or any of them. -

In Witnefs whereof the said Philip Ebbert has hereunto hand and affessed his Seal this day of year above written.

Seal of and delivered in person of Jos. Penn- Abdiel Unhefer Philip Ebbert
(Signature of)

State of Maryland Fred. County to whit

On June 1st, 1826 before us the subscribers two Justices of the Peace for the County Personnally appears Philip Ebbert the within named, and acknowleged the within instruments of writing to be his act and deed, according to the perfect true interest and meaning thereof, and the act of apembly in such case in accordance provided.

Acknowledged before, Jos. Penn (signature) and Abdiel Unhefer (signature)

[NI0104] The following was written by Grace Radcliff Evans.

In the Rocky Hill Reformed Church record is found - "David, son of Henry and Elizabeth Schwedtner, born 2-8-1789, baptized 9-9-1789". Have been told David never married, but have no records to prove it.

David SCHWEDNER
Sex: M
Event(s): Christened: 9 Sep 1789 Frederick, German Reformed Church, Frederick, Maryland
Parents:
Father: Henry SCHWEDNER
Mother: Elisabeth
Source Information:
Batch number: C507711
Sheet:
Source:

IGI Records (Family Search)
David SCHWEDNER
Sex: M
Event(s): Christening: 9 Sep 1789, German Reformed Church, Frederick, Frederick, Maryland
Parents: Father: Henry SCHWEDNER Mother: Elisabeth
Source Information: Batch number: C507711 Dates: 1746-1875 Source Call No. 0013935 IT 46

[NI0105] From the Grace Radcliff Evans Report.

Moved to OHio, there married, but do not know wife's name. Children: Michael J.... There were other children of Henry Sweadner, who also lived in OHio, but their names and addresses are unknown to me.

Centennial Portrait and Biographical Record of the City of Dayton and of Montgomery County, Ohio, page 1309, Henry Swadener was a mechanic, and while yet a young man located in Montgomery county in its early pioneer days, and bought a small farm in Van Buren twonship. Here he died in 1858, at sixty-nine years of age. His father died in Maryland. The maternal grandfather of Samuel Swadener, Mr. Suman, located in Van Buren township as one of the earliest of the pioneers, and lived here all his life.

[NI0106] From Grace Radcliff Evans Report.

Also called "Betsy", married Samuel Himes (or Hines), and they moved to Ohio. Could find nothing more about them

[NI0109] From the Grace Radcliff Evans Report.

Polly, born 5-21-1797, married Thomas Jones, moved to Ohio. Further history unknown

[NI0111] The following from the Grace Radcliff Evans report.

Jonason, born 12-5-1800. Suppose he doed prior to 1830, as he is not mentioned in the list of his father's children given on that date in Equity Record J.S. No. 11, Folio 100 in the Court House in Frederick. Born 5 Dec 1800, died, circa 1825.

[NI0112] William was an undertaker and a cabinetmaker. Buried at Fairmount Cemetery in Libertytown.

[NI0119] As published in "The Olympian", Obituaries Friday, February 9, 2000, "Reah F. Kitchel"

Reah Frances Kitchel, 102, a 30-year resident of Olympia, died of natural causes Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2001, at Puget Sound Healthcare Center, Olympia. She was born May 23, 1898, to Victor and Lillian (Dustin) Bailey in Clary County, Mich. She married Lewis H. Kitchel on Dec. 30, 1916. He preceded her in death. Mrs. Kitchel was a homemaker. She enjoyed reading, fancy work, blackberry picking, flowers, gardening, clam digging, traveling and spending time with her grandchildren.

Mrs. Kitchel is survived by five grandsons, David Whiteman, Jim Zard, Richard T. Malone, Thomas Malone and Russell Zard; three granddaughters, Janice Dillard, Vicki Garrett and Susan Zard; 29 great-grandchildren; and 39 great-great-grandchildren.

No services are planned. Arrangements are by American Burial and Cremation Services, Tumwater.

Footnote: A "sad" outcome of her passing and the fact that Aunt Reah outlived all of her own children, Aunt Reah's cremated remains, as of June 5, 2001, have never been interned at the family plot at Memorial Park Cemetery. Her final resting place remains empty. The 'whereabouts" of her remains are unknown. How sad!

As of February 16, 2002 a tombstone has been placed on her son Richard Lewis Kitchel's (1927-1941) plot at Claquato. According to a distant relative her ashes were scattered, at her request, in one of favorite blackberry picking patches. Aunt Reah "loved" picking blackberrys.

[NI0120] IGI Record

Salome SCHWEDNER, Sex: F, Event(s): Christening: 28 Sep 1791, Grace Evangelical Lutheran Or Formerly St. Peters Church, Rocky Hill, Frederick, Maryland
Parents: Father: Andreas SCHWEDNER, Mother: Catharina
Source Information:
Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
C504281 1767-1875 0845442 IT 4 Film 0933974 Film

Sheet:

[NI0123] From the Grace Radcliff Evans Report.

Valentine came to Ohio with his broher, Abraham, but when Abraham moved to Indiana, Valentine went South, Further history unknown.

[NI0124] As reported by Jeanne Yoakam, Marion Ohio:

Documented proof of Jacob Swadner's (a.k.a. Jacob Swaidner) parentage is not available. Family history indicated that Jacob's parents are Adam Swadner (Schwedner/Swaidner) and Eve Lehman-Swadner. When documentation is made discovered this will be updated.

NameLifespan Where Born
Jacob SWAIDNER1791-1872MD
Additional Notes Migration Steps
wife Barbarato Columbiana County, OH in 1826
to Ashland County, OH in 1834
to Allen County, IN in 1854
Researcher: Jeanne Yoakam

[NI0125] Daniel, born near Libertytown. Married 12-22-1840 to Clementine Carr. She was born 8-16-1828. They resided in Liberty the most of their lives, where they died and both were interred in Fairmount Cemeter, Libertytown.

[NI0154] Geography and Early History of the Frederick County Jail

In March of 1732 the proprietor of the Province of Maryland desired to attract settlers to the northern and western areas of his territory, so he made a proclamation declaring special land prices and taxes for settlers.(1)

Any person having a family to come to the land within three years of the proclamation and actually settle on the land could have two hundred acres without payment for 3 years. After 3 years the settler had to pay to the proprietor four shillings sterling for every hundred acres; or. Any single person, male or female between the ages of 14 and 31 could have 100 acres under the same conditions; or They were to be charged taxes and the security of their land would be insured as if they were British subjects.

The first petition to form a new county was entered into legislation in 1739. The petition was delivered by Benjamin Tasker, a former
President of the Governors Council of Maryland. This same Benjamin Tasker was given the land grant on which Fredericktown was laid out. Frederick County was created by an act of the Assembly on the 10th day of December in 1748, from parts of Baltimore and Prince George's counties (Chapter 15, Acts 1748). The County was probably named after Frederick Calvert (1731-1771), sixth and last Lord Baltimore, who was the Proprietor of Maryland from 1751 until his death in 1771 at Naples, Italy.

The new county (Frederick) was the largest in the State of Maryland. It included all of the lands of the present counties of Montgomery,
Washington, Allegany and Garrett, as well as portions of Howard and Carroll counties until 1776 when Montgomery and Washington counties and all of the land west were removed.(2)

The first courts for a year or so were held in the "Dutch Meeting House," and subsequently for a while in the upper story of Mrs. Charlton's
tavern, on the southwest corner of Market and Patrick Streets. An act of the General Assembly of 1748, provided for the purchase of three acres of land in or adjoining Fredericktown on which to build a Courthouse and Jail.

On the 10th of May, 1750, Daniel Dulany made a deed for lots 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, containing by estimation three acres, to Nathaniel
Wickham, Jr., Thomas Beatty, Joseph Ogle, William Griffith, Edward Sprigg, Jr., and John Kimbal, the commissioners appointed by act of the Assembly to purchase three acres of ground for building a courthouse and jail. These lots were each 62 feet wide and 393 feet deep, extending from Church Street to Second Street. The consideration was eighteen pounds.

In 1750 John Shellman and Joseph Hardman started building the Courthouse and completed the shell by November 24, 1750. The first jail
was built in 1753. It (jail) stood opposite the Courthouse on the site of the home of Mrs. Chas. W. Ross, Jr. (101 - 105 Council Street). A whipping post was erected on the southeast corner of the lot. In 1776 the General Assembly authorized a levy of 30,000 pounds of tobacco to build a stone wall around the jail.

John Shellman reported to the June court in 1755, that he was unable to complete the county jail because so many wagons had been pressed into His Majesty's service that none were available for hauling lime, lumber, and stone. Benjamin Franklin had procured most of the wagons in the county for General Braddock's use in the Western Maryland campaign. The French and Indian War had effectively brought the building industry in Frederick County to a standstill for want of transportation. (5)

In December 1775 the Tory Jail or Tory Gaol was built in Fredericktown, opening in June 1776. It was a two story log building with each story divided into three rooms. A small house for the keeper and guards was built next door. These were located on East Second Street just past the corner of North Market Street.(2). There is a plaque commemorating this historical jail at the old Farmers and Mechanics Bank Building located on East Second Street. (Figure 1)

December 13, 1749 John Murphy was sentenced to be hanged for "felony and burglary," becoming the first person executed in Frederick
County. He was tried, convicted and hung all in the same day.(3)

In December of 1777 one hundred prisoners from the Revolutionary War were sent to Fredericktown to be kept in the log jail until Fort
Frederick could receive them. On Christmas Day they attempted a jail break by setting the building on fire, but the local militia quelled the outbreak. (2)

August 17, 1781 Caspar Fritchie, Peter Sueman, and Yost Plecker were hanged for treason at the rear of the Tory Jail on East Second
Street. Four others who were convicted and sentenced with this trio were pardoned by Thoms Sim Lee, Maryland's governor.(3)

During the 19th century public hangings were a major source of entertainment. In such reported cases, the sheriff resorted to issuing tickets for admission into the jail yard. Roof-tops in the area were reportedly jammed with people who didn't have tickets.(3) The sound of the jail bell "Hanging Bell" alerted the public that the hanging was ready to begin. The jail bell which hung over the Frederick County Jail (South Street) for over 100 years, now resides at the Frederick County Adult Detention Center on Marcie's Choice Lane. The "Hanging Bell" was manufactured by Josh Regester Company in Baltimore, Maryland. (Figure 2)

Land Maps found at the Frederick County Public Library indicate during the era of 1801 - 1808 the Frederick County Jail was located at the
corner of West Second Street and Public Avenue (now Court Street). Land Maps during the era of 1841 through 1862 indicate the Frederick County Jail was located on West South Street. However, there appears to be a separation between the Sheriff's House and the Jail during this period. History is vague on when the Frederick County Jail moved from the West 2nd Street and Public Street to the West South Street location.

The General Assembly in 1814 empowered the justice of the Levy Court to sell the ground on which the jail and scale house were located.
They subdivided the land into twelve small lots. On March 12, 1815 the lots were sold at public auction. John McPherson was the highest bidder at $8,250 and purchased the land where the old jail and scale house stood.

THE CITIZEN Frederick, Maryland Friday Morning, September 19, 1862

JAIL BURNT

On Saturday night last, about 12 o'clock, the Jail in this city was fired, on the inside, by some Negroes confined there for safe-keeping, and the fire had made such progress before discovered, that it could not be arrested and the building was entirely consumed. The prisoners were all secured, except three or four by a squad of soldiers who were ordered promptly to surround the building. Michael Zimmerman, Esq., Sheriff, who occupied a port of the building, lost nearly the whole of his furniture.

(Last Saturday Night refers to Saturday, September 13, 1862)

On September 13, 1862, the burning of the Frederick County Jail, set on fire by inmates, was another severe loss to Frederick, but with
characteristic courage the people began the construction of a new edifice. It was built by James Hopwood on the site of the West South Street jail site, the latter having been built in 1875-76 at a cost of $72,000. The architect was Frank E. Davis, of Baltimore, and the general superintendent of construction was the late David Frazier, who had as chief carpenter David H. Kolb. The masonry and brick work were done by Haller & Hergesheimer, Routzahn & Bowers furnishing the lumber and Flinn & Emmick the heating apparatus. Ebbert & Son did the plumbing, and the building throughout is a solid and substantial structure, well ventilated, three stories, with a dwelling for the sheriff and separate cells for prisoners.(1,3).


On Saturday night about half past 11 O'clock, September 13, 1862 the Frederick County Jail was set on fire by some of the inmates the roof of the jail was all in flames when discovered and Sheriff Michael Zimmerman, Esq, who lives there saved the greater part of the furniture - but the building was entirely destroyed but being of stone & stoutly built the fire was confined to the inside alone - the Hydrant water had been shut off which prevented the engines from working until to late - and as the town had all day been in Commotion the people were hard to waken - so that few were there. None of the prisoners however escaped.

Monday - September 15, 1862 4:00 O'clock p.m. Jacob Englebrecht Diary

New Jail of Frederick, The Commissioners of our County, are about building a new Jail back or north of the old one, in west South Street, - I
was there this day, they are at the foundations, partly of which is up to the Square, it appears to be laid all in Cement - the building is to be of brick. They will also build a house for the Sheriff - Mr. David Frazier, Superintendent, (800.000. Brick)

Friday - October 23, 1874 - 11:00 O'clock am Jacob Engelbrecht Diary

Arm Broken - Mr. David H. Kolb whilst working on the third story of the New Jail - fell from the Scaffolding yesterday morning & broke his left arm,

Friday - June 25, 1875 - 09:00 O'clock am Jacob Engelbrecht Dia

PS Mr. Kolb was just 44 years old, lacking 2 months exactly.


New Jail - The Sheriff (Mr. John Sweadner) intends to move in the new Jail this week - Commence to-day or tomorrow the building of the
New Jail took nearly two years, Mr. David Frazier, Superintendent, and Mr. Nichs T. Haller undertook the Mason work & Mr. Calvin Page furnished the Iron work, Castings, etc. It took eight hundred thousand brick (800.000) furnished by Mr. Benjamin F. Winchester, - the whole cost was (No entry)

Wednesday - January 26, 1876 - 10:00 O'clock am P.S. he did not move until February 1, 1876.

The steel cell doors, locks and bars at the Frederick County Jail located on West South Street were cast by Calvin Page & Company of
Frederick, Maryland in 1875. Calvin Page & Company was located in the area of West South Street and Broadway. The remains of these castings are still there today. Phoebus junk yard was located across the way from the jail.

During the early years, the Sheriffalty (Sheriff) and his family were provided housing as part of the benefits of the position. The front
"House" of the Frederick County Jail was the Sheriff's residence. This picture is of the 1890's era.

Picture courtesy of Reverend Michael Albro, Executive Director of the Beacon House, Frederick, Maryland.

The last execution held at the Frederick County Jail was on November 10, 1922. William A. Stultz was hung for the murder of Frederick City
Police Officer John Adams. Stultz was the last person to be executed in Frederick County, Maryland.(3)


The Frederick News Thursday, April 27, 1922 ALL HANGINGS TO TAKE PLACE AFTER JUNE 1ST AT "PEN"

Bill Providing For Change Passed

Legislature and Signedby Governor

EXECUTIONS WERE BECOMI

TOO PUBLIC, REASON GIVEN

Tickets Widely Distributed in Baltimore County Recently.

Among the laws passed at the last session of the legislature was one providing that all executions shall take place at the Maryland penitentiary. The reason that such a bill was brought up before the state legislature was the fact that executions were being made too much of a public affair, which was to a certain extent detrimental to the morals of the community. A recent hanging which took place in Baltimore County, delegation to the legislature was presented with a number of tickets granting him admission to the affair. It was this that prompted Senator McIntosh of Baltimore County to introduce a bill in the Senate to have a central point where all executions should take place.

The opponents of the bill brought out the fact that by transferring the execution from a county seat to the state penitentiary, the force of
example would be materially weakened. However, the bill passed the Senate a few days before it went through the House, the body passed it during the last week it was in session.

All laws that are passed by the Legislature can not become affective before June 1, unless there is an emergency clause which provides that it must be necessary for the public health or public safety; in the case of an emergency clause; three-fifths of the vote of both houses must be had in order for it to pass, whereas for all other laws, only a majority vote is required.

It is understood that the bill pertaining to the concentration of all executions in a central point had no emergency clause. Therefore it will not go into effect before June 1 of this year.

The Frederick County Jail as it stands today on West South Street, 123 years after being rebuilt in 1875-76.

Frederick County Government sold this building to the Frederick Rescue Mission and converted to the "Beacon House" in 1984.


Population Trends

May 1, 1922 Sheriff reports total of 19 high

The News

19 PRISONERS IN JAIL HIGHEST FOR ONE DAY IN APRIL

That Number Reached on Two Occasions in the Past Month

SEVEN ON THE 13TH WAS MINIMUM INCARCERATED

Sheriff Makes Monthly Report to the County Commissioners

The largest number of prisoners confined in the county jail for one day during the month of April was 19, according to the report of James A.
Jones, Sheriff, to the Board of County Commissioners. On two different days during the past month there were 19 prisoners in jail, on the 15th and on the 30th. The smallest number on one day was the 13th, when only seven prisoners were incarcerated in the locate bastille.

Following is a list of the number of prisoners on the several days of April

1st - 18, 2nd - 9, 3rd - 14, 4th - 17, 5th -8, 6th - 8, 7th - 9, 8th - 8, 9th - 8, 10th- 10, 11th- 10, 12th- 9, 13th- 7, 14th-14, 15th-19,
16th-16, 17th-15, 18th-18, 19th-18, 20th-15, 21st-11, 22nd-14, 23rd-11, 24th- 9, 25th-10, 26th-11, 27th-11, 28th-16, 29th-13 and
30th-19. 42 For Vagrancy

The largest number of prisoners in jail were arrested on charges of vagrancy. A total of 42 were taken into custody on this charge alone.
There was one prisoner in jail charged with blackmail. That prisoner was Jams E. Hall who was convicted and sentenced to seven years in the Maryland "pen". One prisoner was in for murder. He was Charles H. Hill is now serving a life term after having been convicted of slaying his aunt, Cecilia C. Ricketts.

Other charges against prisoners are: Assault, 10; bastardy, 2; disorderly conduct, 3; insane, 2; desertion, 3; bootlegging, 1;
larceny, 1; drunk, 3; and non-support, 1.

During the years to follow, the inmate population has only increased. In 1979 the inmate population was estimated at 35 to 50 prisoners with the inclusion of the work release program. In 1989 drug enforcement was in great demand. With all law enforcement officers enforcing the laws and the judicial courts handing down greater sentences, the Frederick County Jail's population rose to an estimated 523 prisoners on one weekend. During the overcrowding times in 1989, cots from the American Red Cross and United States Civil Defense were borrowed to meet the demands of the sleeping arrangements for offenders.

During the late 70's the Frederick County Jail became overcrowded and badly in need of repair. The Sheriff, County Commissioners and
influential citizens began the search for funding and options to either refurbish and add to the existing facility or to build a separate new facility to handle the pending growth. A master study plan was completed for the potential growth of incarcerants in the correctional facility for the next 10 years.

The Frederick County Commissioners were considering whether to locate the proposed new jail around the existing facility or build a whole new building at some other location in the county. Sheriff Donald C. Barnes felt "the present site will be the best location if they can have sufficient land base" in the area. (June 2, 1977 - Frederick New Post)

A FIVE hour meeting between local state delegates, county commissioners, Sheriff Donald C. Barnes, Mayor Ronald N. Young, state jail
officials, and county planner Larry Johnson, rallied to resolve whether Frederick County's new jail should be located on South Street, the Sagner property on Wisner Avenue, the site of the former Maryland Chick Hatchery (All Saints Street) or on a nine-acre farm in the county. (November 18, 1977 - Frederick News Post).

As it turned out, the new Frederick County Jail would end up on a nine-acre farm in the county. Accessible by Route 85, the Frederick County Adult Detention Center was then a reality. Funding from the county and state were approved and the ground breaking and building commenced. One of the most important decisions was to name the roadway which would handle all the traffic from Route 85 to the Detention Center's parking lot. The choice was made "Marcie's Choice", named after Commissioner Galen Claggett's daughter.

The Frederick County Adult Detention Center located on Marcie's Choice Lane, officially opened on October 4, 1984 to a cost of $6.7 million
dollars. Spacious housing was built for 96 Males, 10 Females and 22 Specialized Bed totaling 128 actual beds. At the time of occupancy for the year of 1984 the Inmate Population High was 111 and Low was 75. Total intakes for the year were 2,320 Males and 194 Females.

The right side of this picture is the Frederick County Adult Detention Center which opened on October 4, 1984. The left side of the picture is
the Frederick County Work Release Center which was opened in November 1989. (See interior report of additions to the Detention Center)

Information for New Detention Center which opened in 1984. Average Length of Stay: 12.3 Days, Age Range: 18-25, Inmate Cost Per Day:
$27.00 Total Operating Budget: $1,270,229 Total Staff: 65

Bibliography References

1.Adapted from "History of Frederick County" Authored by Thomas. J. C. Williams
2.Adapted from "A Textbook History Of Frederick County" Authored by Paul B. Gordon and Rita S. Gordon
3.Adapted from "..and all our yesterdays" Authored by John W. Ashbu
4.Land Maps of the Frederick County Public Library.
Frederick County Jail / West 2nd Street & Public Avenue (Court Street) 1808
Frederick County Jail / 419 West South Street (Jail Street) 1843 1857
5.Adapted from "In & Out of Frederick"
6.Jacob Engelbrecht Diary's Vol I, II, III



Maryland was the 7th state to enter the union of the original thirteen colonies now called the United States of America.

Whereas, the State of Maryland borders four states to include Pennsylvania, Virginia, Delaware and West Virginia. Frederick County borders three of the four (Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia).

Frederick County is also bordered by four other counties within the State of Maryland to include: Montgomery County, Washington County,
Howard County, and Carroll County.

Frederick County is still the largest county by land mass with a total of 663 square miles. Frederick City, the county seat, intersects 5 major interstates and national highways that provide easy access to Baltimore, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Gettysburg, Pa., Harpers Ferry, WV., to name a few. In 1990 the population of Frederick County was 150,208 and has been estimated to grow to 203,200 by the year 2000. 1997 had an estimated population of 190,000 and 1998 - 190,350.

Frederick County's 4,224 businesses employ 51,499 workers; an estimated 85 firms employ 100 or more workers. Manufacturing accounts for 10% of total employment. The county's largest employers include the National Cancer Institute at Fort Deterick, State Farm Insurance, Frederick Memorial Hospital and Eastalco Aluminum.

Over the past 250 years, Frederick County has it's own place in American History, to include:

Camp David
The Carillon Tower
The Hession Barracks
Barbara Fritchie House
Francis Scott Key Monument
Roger Brooke Taney's Home
Rose Hill Manor (Governor Thomas Johnson's Home)
B & O Railroad Station at Point of Rocks
Mother Seton Shrine
Grotto of the Lords
Covered Bridges

This does not include Frederick's involvement in the Revolutionary War, French & Indian War, Civil War Battles fought on or near Frederick
County soil, World War I, World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam Conflic

The Frederick County Sheriff's Office - Corrections Bureau (Frederick County Adult Detention Center) has served the Populus of Frederick
County for over 250 years. With the first jail built 1753 - 1757 (2nd and Public Street), second jail built 1809 - 1814 (W. South Street), third jail built (1875-76) and the present facility (1984).

Since the inception of the JAIL, it has evolved into one of the finest Correctional Facilities in the State of Maryland. While the name has
changed from Frederick County Jail to Frederick County Adult Detention Center to Frederick County Sheriff's Office - Corrections Bureau, the
commitment of it's staff to provide a safe and secure facility remains.

[NI0160] The Star-Mirror
By Kathleen Peck Probasco

The Star-Mirror
November 19 1914

Location: Moscow, Idaho
Source: University of Idaho Library

The funeral of Charles Swadener, the aged pioneer, who passed away at his home yesterday, death being due to paralysis, will be held from the family home, at 315 Second street at 1:30 tomorrow afternoon, Rev. D.H. Hare of the Presbyterian church officiating.

The deceased had been one of the most substantial citizens of Moscow and because of his genial disposition had endeared himself to all with whom had grown to know him. He was a native of Libertytown, Md., born June 3, 1850. While a young man he moved to Dayton, Ohio, where he resided a number of years. There he met Emma R. Travis and they were joined in wedlock in 1876. Subsequently he resided for a short period at Fredonia, Kansas, after removing to Moscow in September, 1893.

The deceased is survived by the widow, Emma R. Swadener, and two children, Mrs. Lyman C. Reed of Spokane and Robert B. Swadener of Orofino, also a sister, Elizabeth Swadener, and a brother, John Swadener, both of Libertytown, Maryland.

[NI0179] Indiana's Man for All Seasons
by Lucy Jane King, MD
Lucy Jane King, MD, speaking at the Indiana Medical History Museum. November 21, 2002

The Pathology Building on the grounds of what was Central State Hospital was dedicated by the Marion County Medical Society on December 18, 1896. In an address on that occasion, Dr. Ludwig Hektoen of Chicago noted, "The present occasion marks a most significant step in the advancement and improvement of the humanitarian work in which institutions like the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane are engaged. The inauguration . . . of a fully equipped, substantial department of this hospital, built in accordance with the best modern views, reflects great credit upon the development of American [psychiatry], upon the intelligence of the Board of Control of this institution and of its Superintendent."

A couple of weeks earlier, Dr. Burr of Flint, Michigan had commented to the society about ". . . this superb, and in many respects, unique, pathological laboratory, which in the perfection of its design and equipment will ever remain a monument to the enthusiasm, sagacity and philanthropy of . . . Dr. George F. Edenharter."

Who was this state hospital superintendent that colleagues around the Midwest were complimenting so highly? George Frederick Edenharter's story is in many ways similar to that of others in the lower Midwest at the turn of the twentieth century, but it is unusual in terms of the qualities on the man, himself.

His parents had come from Germany about 1848, possibly as a result of the rise of populist opposition to authoritarian governments there and the suppression of nascent revolutions at about that time. His mother was from Saxony and his father from Bavaria where he had learned the trade of cabinet maker. After immigrating to the United States, they lived in various towns in southwestern Ohio. Their three daughters died at early ages, but the two sons would grow into adult life and become professional men in Indianapolis. Their son, George was born in 1857 in Piqua, Ohio and completed his early education in Dayton. There he met Marion Swadener, the girl he would later marry.

In the late 1870s Edenharter's family moved to Indianapolis. George, like his father, entered a trade, in his case cigar making at a local factory, and was a member of the cigar maker's union. He was active in the Knights of Labor, an early organization of workers in the developing labor movement, possibly reflecting views that his parents had brought from the turmoil of Europe in mid-nineteenth century. George was also involved in politics and was elected a member of the Indianapolis City Council in 1884 and 1886. Edenharter ran for Mayor of Indianapolis in 1887, barely losing as a Democrat in a heavily Republican city and running well ahead of the rest of the ticket. He was later asked by his party to run for Governor, but by that time he had become very much involved in being a medical administrator. His ethical perspective was such that he was rigorously nonpartisan as an administrator. He was elected unanimously by bipartisan boards to city and state hospital administrations. Although he was no longer a partisan in his work, his knowledge of politics sometimes stood him in good stead. He maintained close ties with members of the State Legislature of both parties during his tenure as Superintendent of the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane and often visited the state house to talk with legislators.

George Edenharter's medical education reflects several trends of the time just before the development of medical education in universities in which he would play an important part. After a few years as a cigar maker that allowed him to save money for advanced education, he apprenticed to a local physician, Dr. Frank Morrison, and then attended Indiana Medical College from 1884 to 1886. As a full-fledged M.D., he returned to practice with Dr. Morrison until 1890. Another aspect typical of young physicians of the time was that he did not marry until 1888, after two years in medical practice, presumably again saving money for an important life change.
While practicing with Dr. Morrison, he was physician to the Marion County Asylum for two years and then to the Marion County Work-House for over a year. The Board of Aldermen unanimously appointed him Superintendent of the City Hospital in 1890. When his first two-year term was completed, the new Board of Health, now in charge of the city facility, appointed him to another two-year term.

The Indiana Medical Journal, December, 1892, commented, "[ Indianapolis City Hospital] was never in better order than under the present superintendent. Dr. Geo. F. Edenharter is a master of the multitudinous details that make perfect a modern hospital. The surgery is a model for any institution of like character to copy. In it are a hundred devices showing the superintendent's thoughtful care and ingenuity. The operating-table, the serving-table, the sterilizing apparatus, the arrangement and supply of instruments, the dispensing of medicines, the pathological and clinical laboratory, the system of signals are all devices [designed by] the superintendent." Edenharter had undoubtedly learned craftsman's skills from his cabinet maker father. The medical journal author continued, "Over and above all this, the patients are not neglected. [This] writer has asked scores of them, when presented at the clinic, how they liked the City Hospital. There is never any complaint. The hospital is becoming popular among the poor. They have no fear of it, and are ready to go there when sick. The relations existing between the superintendent and the internes and the training-school for nurses are of the most friendly and helpful kind." It is no surprise that the Board of Trustees of the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane asked George Edenharter in 1893 to become superintendent here nor that Dr. Edenharter would plan and build, over opposition, the Pathology Laboratory. He had already designed many innovations in the facilities of the City Hospital. Initially, reappointment was required every four years, but after five such appointments, the Board of Trustees unanimously appointed him as Superintendent, indefinitely, as long as he chose to remain. He served another ten years until his death in 1923.

In their 1909 report, the Board of Trustees of the hospital reported, "The wards of the state entrusted to this institution receive the most modern and progressive treatment known to hospital practice; in fact, the work being done here is so favorably received by the profession that many leading . . . [psychiatrists] of not only this country but of other countries visit this hospital and, in written communications and otherwise, evidence their most hearty and enthusiastic approval of methods employed and results accomplished. These results are the outgrowth of the theories and plans of Dr.George F. Edenharter. . ."

The superintendent provided research reports from the hospital to colleges throughout the state in order that they might benefit from the work done here. In 1904 he was given an honorary Master's Degree by one of them, Wabash College. He was chairman of the Indiana State Conference of Charities and Corrections in 1908 and was a Fellow of the American Medical Association. His other professional memberships included the American Medico-Psychological Association and its successor the American Psychiatric Association, the New York Medico-Legal Society of which he was Vice President for Indiana, the Indiana State Medical Society, and the Indianapolis Medical Society. He had won national recognition and respect. In the local community he was a thirty-third degree Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias. The department here had become the locus of teaching and research in psychiatry when the Indiana University School of Medicine was opened in 1903. Both Indiana University and Purdue University had medical schools at the time and both sent students to study psychiatry, neurology, and neuropathology here. Within a few years, Indiana University became the only medical school in the state, and this was the location of teaching and research in psychiatry until the 1950s.

During the first year of Edenharter's superintendence the census averaged about 1500 patients. As was the custom, his wife, Marion, served as matron, a sort of ombudsman and kindly visitor among the patients. There was a pathologist, F.A. Morrison, two assistant physicians in the department for men, three assistant physicians in the department for women. In other words, there were a total of seven physicians, six general physicians and a pathologist, in a hospital for 1500 patients. Later, there would be three physicians each for the Men's Department and the Women's Department and an assistant pathologist as well as the pathologist.

Dr. Edenharter noted in his first annual report, for 1894, that, "It affords us much pleasure to announce that plans have been matured and perfected, whereby we will be enabled to completely reconstruct and reorganize our pathological department. It will be placed on such footing as to meet the requirements of the most exacting pathological investigations."

There was a great deal of controversy about the building of this facility, including the concern that such an elaborate and expensive laboratory was unnecessary for a state hospital for the insane. Ultimately, Edenharter managed to construct it with very creative use of existing funds and very little help from his friends in the state legislature. He worked carefully with the architect in the design of all the features of the building using the skills he had developed at the city hospital to design a facility for the efficient use of the latest laboratory techniques. Once the building was opened in 1896, pictures of the building and floor plans of its layout were included in subsequent annual reports to the governor. Later reports by both trustees and superintendent continued to supply reasons for the importance of the Pathology Building. For example, the 1905 trustee's report states, "The wisdom of the establishment of this department is becoming recognized more and more as the work therein continues, and while at the time of its erection and establishment it was an entirely new departure in hospital management, yet today it is taken advantage of by the medical profession of the state and medical students receive therein a course of practical instruction with apparatus and facilities more complete that can be found in many [other] medical colleges."

That same year the superintendent noted the importance of autopsies in educating staff physicians about their cases as an aid to diagnosis of future cases. These opportunities were extended to medical students and to physicians in the community. It was suggested that the duty of the state to provide the best possible care to patients in state institutions included provision of this kind of education for physicians. [It was not only important, it was their duty!] Several points addressing this were added. Providing instruction to the physicians and students prepared them to render early skilled attention to the mentally afflicted in their community. This directly benefited the citizens. Such education increased the ability of the physician to deliver an intelligent judgment in insanity inquests and to dictate a description of the case that would be of value to the hospital. Such work by educated local physicians who testified in insanity hearings economized for the counties and the state by decreasing the number of persons annually committed to "this or institutions of like character." In addition the training would encourage medical students' interest in psychiatry and provide future staff for the hospital. The public would be educated about these matters as well by publications and lectures of the staff.

Detailed reports of autopsies and collection of statistics about clinical cases, their demographics and diagnoses, as well as preparation of specimens for the pathological museum continued throughout his tenure and beyond. Staff presented papers to the Marion County Medical Society and later the Indianapolis Medical Society. Some publications appeared in journals including the Indianapolis Medical Journal, the Alienist and Neurologist published in St. Louis for a national audience, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the American Journal of Insanity predecessor of the American Journal of Psychiatry. New books and journals were added annually to the physicians' library.

Diagnoses used the clinical schemes recently developed in Europe, the first efforts to define psychiatric disorders as syndromes rather than as variations of imbalances in body fluids, the millennia old "unitary theory of disease," that is that there is just one mental illness with variations in individual patients. Kraepelin had differentiated manic-depressive psychosis from dementia praecox in the late nineteenth century. Earlier in the nineteenth century, European psychiatrists had delineated dementia as related to medical diseases and characterized by disorientation and memory loss among other "organic" symptoms. A list of diagnoses at Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane in the first decade of the twentieth century included manic-depressive psychoses and involutional psychoses, both mood disorders delineated by Kraepelin that would be subsumed under Bipolar Disorder and Major Depression today. Dementia Praecox, or what we would call Schizophrenia, and Paranoia had been described as "thought" disorders [in contrast to mood disorders] by Kraepelin, and were now being diagnosed at Central Indiana Hospital in contrast to other vaguer diagnoses used here in the nineteenth century. Organic psychoses, intoxication psychoses, paresis, and exhaustion psychoses, apparently usually associated with severe medical illnesses, were included as were psychoneuroses, now subsumed under anxiety and somatoform disorders. Important to developing useful classifications of psychiatric disorders was separating out those that didn't meet criteria for then known disorders so that more research could be done. Thus, there were a small number of patients considered to have diagnoses that were "unclassified."

Dr. Charles Neu, who was pathologist at the hospital from 1903 to 1906, issued a lengthy report of his three years of work in the first of the reports of the Pathological Department. One hundred forty-seven autopsies had been performed. In classes open to physicians in the city as well as to medical students, Neu lectured on topics like the neuron concept and the role of axons and dendrites, the relation of the peripheral nerves to the central nervous system, and tertiary syphilis of the brain or paresis, all recent discoveries by European scientists like Ramon y Cajal, Nissl, Golgi, and Ehrlich. In the days when only light microscopy and gross and microscopic pathology as well as blood counts and some blood chemistries were available, physicians here were trying to discover the physical basis of mental disease.

In 1898, Edenharter hired Max Bahr, an Indianapolis native who completed medical school here and then served as chief resident physician at the Government Emergency Hospital, in Washington, D.C. where he saw patients from the Government Hospital for the Insane and had become interested in psychiatry. After serving as an Assistant Physician at the Central Hospital for a decade, Bahr was given leave of absence in 1908 to study for a year in Germany. With his Doctor of Psychological Medicine from the University of Berlin, Bahr became the first physician trained as a psychiatrist at the hospital here and was promoted to Chief of Clinical Psychiatry.
Bahr presented a paper to the medical society based on notes from his work with Professor Theodor Ziehen, chief psychiatrist at the Berlin Charity Hospital, "The General Treatment of the Insane in the Practice of Professor Ziehen." In line with the theories of the time, it was emphasized that prevention of mental illness was important in terms of providing a healthy and structured environment for children. [The mental health movement, overly optimistic at the time, was beginning in this country.] Hospitalization would become necessary for suicidal patients and those dangerous to the community. Dr. Ziehen had taught Bahr that bed rest, proper diet, physical occupation, avoidance of external stimuli, and hydrotherapy would be beneficial. Application of galvanic current to the head didn't seem to help. Since the early nineteenth century, electricity had seemed important in the cure of "nervous and mental" illness. Electroconvulsive therapy, the first electrical treatment that benefited psychiatric patients did not become available until the late 1930s, and it would be used by Max Bahr and his staff. Medications at the time Bahr studied in Europe included morphine, alkaloids [atropine and scopolamine], chloral hydrate, paraldehyde, bromides, and some of the early barbiturates. [Anti psychotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants were a half century in the future.] Continuing his outline of Professor Ziehen's practice in Germany, Bahr described general principles of "psychical therapy" as including encouragement, not arguing about delusions, and being truthful with patients. Hypnosis was helpful in some cases. Restraint was to be limited to a few exceptional cases and restraint and seclusion permitted only on a physician's orders, not just implemented by unsupervised attendants.
Bahr developed a detailed plan for routine careful clinical examination to be performed on all patients and began what were in essence epidemiological studies. He catalogued summaries of patients by gender and other demographic characteristics and by diagnosis, reporting first on over three hundred patients and later on over twenty-six hundred patients. His findings were correlated with pathological findings in research reports published by the hospital, presented to the local medical society, and distributed to colleges and universities throughout Indiana.

Papers presented to the medical society by Bahr and others of the staff included topics such as pathology and clinical manifestations of brain tumors, 3 cases of acute suppurative meningitis of pneumococcal origin, a case of hemorrhagic pancreatits, the significance of fear in mental diseases, a report of a case with claustrophobia, psychotherapy as applied to the insane, and clinical observations of twenty-two cases of paresis. They were covering the field as it was then known, including evidence based on the work here.

Meanwhile, Dr. Edenharter had seen to the construction of a hospital for the [medically] sick insane with wards for infectious diseases and complete surgical facilities. There were five buildings connected by corridors and connected as well by corridors to the Men's Building and to the Women's Building. In these days before air conditioning and much in the way of central heating, a special ventilation system with conduits in hollow walls ventilated from the basement and a system of fans was incorporated into the building. Bathrooms and lavatories were lined with enameled brick, the entire building complex was wired for "incandescent electricity with iron-armored conduits," all rooms faced the southwest so that they would be healthily sunny and cheerful, and there were "airing roofs" so patients could be taken outside in all weather.

Edenharter's legacy continued through the years. When he died in 1923, his protégé, Dr. Bahr, became superintendent of the hospital. Like Edenharter, Bahr would serve thirty years, until shortly before his death, and would expand the work Edenharter had begun. There had been some difficulty keeping a pathologist long-term to supervise this facility. After becoming superintendent, Bahr soon hired Dr. Walter Bruetsch, a neuropathologist who was born in Germany and trained there and in Switzerland. This began a partnership of Bahr, the clinician, and Bruetsch, the neuroscientist, who studied all the new treatments in the developing field of psychiatry in the early twentieth century. More importantly, they carried out follow-up studies to see what worked. They met weekly on Saturday mornings to discuss their studies and to plan new studies that they and their associates would perform. On Saturday afternoons, Bahr and other staff held lectures and clinical demonstrations for medical students in this auditorium.

Among other studies, Bruetsch tackled an important question about the immune system in brain in infectious disease that would not be elucidated for over sixty years. It is only in the past couple of decades that techniques have been available to explore the role of neuroimmunology in psychiatric disorders. Dr. Bruetsch had been sixty years ahead of his time.

In 1938 Central State Hospital was described in a national report as having: "one of the largest and best equipped . . . laboratories in the country for research in mental diseases. It is closely affiliated with the University Hospitals of Indiana University, and serves as a teaching center in psychiatry for Indiana University School of Medicine. . . . There is a training program for residents in psychiatry." It remained a state-of-the art facility until about the time of the Second World War.

Research carried out here in the early days is still important at the medical school. Specimens from the early twentieth century from patients with dementia as well as the detailed clinical reports of the same patients are being used by Dr. Ghetti in the Pathology Department to compare Alzheimer 's disease then with his studies of current patients. Thus the legacy of George Edenharter has been important in psychiatry in Indiana for a century.

By the early 1920s, Edenharter's parents, his wife, and his brother, an Indianapolis lawyer, had died. Only his son, Ralph, then living in Pennsylvania, remained of his family. Edenharter, himself, suffered courageously from long-standing diabetes mellitus, treatable at the time only by diet. Ironically, the newly discovered insulin was being developed commercially at that time by Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis, but the discovery of insulin in Canada and its commercial production in Indianapolis did not occur soon enough to benefit Dr. Edenharter. Not long after the celebration of his thirty years as Superintendent by four hundred of his friends in April, 1923, he had a stroke with paralysis of the right side. After eight weeks confinement in bed, he was able to get about the grounds of the Central Hospital. He became ill again in October with a gastroenterological disorder, suffered another stroke with paralysis, and died December 6, 1923 at age sixty-six. According to his wishes, his body lay in state in the chapel of the hospital where funeral services, open to the public and widely attended, were conducted. He was buried in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, next to his parents.

R. French Stone, M.D., Biography of Eminent American Physicians and Surgeons. Pp.155-156, Indianapolis: Carlon and Hollenbeck Publishers, 1894.
Jacob Piatt Dunn, Greater Indianapolis, The History, the Industries, the Institutions, and the People of a City of Homes. Vol. 2, pp.975-978, Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1910.
Jacob Piatt Dunn, Indiana and Indianans. Vol. V, pp.251-253, Chicago:The American Historical Society, 1919.
Indiana Medical History Quarterly, 7:10, September, 1981.
Obituary, pp.31-32, Indianapolis News, December 7, 1923.
Obituary of Frank T. Edenharter, Indianapolis Star, August 22, 1920.
Obituary of Ralph Edenharter, Indianapolis News, April 6, 1927
All references at Indiana State Library, Indianapolis.

Lucy Jane King, M.D. Dr. King is a clinical professor emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine. She is author of a recently published history of Central State Hospital that includes a memoir of a patient there in the 1880s: From under the Cloud at Seven Steeples, the peculiarly saddened life of Anna Agnew at Indiana Hospital for the Insane, 1878 - 1885, Zionsville: Guild Press/ Emmis Publishing, 2002.

[NI0180] My family and I were on a family history trip down through Adams, Highland, and Scioto counties when I discovered this headstone in the Friendship United Methodist Church Cemetery in Friendship, Scioto County, Ohio. I don't know who this Swadener was, but I thought I would send it along to you just in case you might want it for your records. Hope maybe you know where the connection might be.

Take care of yourself. Have a great autumn!
sincerely,
Lori

[NI0237] Twins: Mollie Blanche and Virginia Lee Sweadner

[NI0292] Alice Genevive Moran b. 12/21/03 d. 4/24/89 and Dean Haddon Swadener b. 9/27/02 d. 4/25/65 married on 11/30/22 at St. Bridget Church in Logansport, IN and lived and were buried in Mishawaka, IN

[NI0293] SSN # 313-24-5497

Letter Received from Jim Swadener, Dick's Brother

Dear Morris,
I'm sorry to have to tell you that my brother Dick passed away last evening. My sister-in-law, Nina, his wife, called me last night. She said his passing was serene, he was ready, as ready as one can be anyway. He went to sleep about 8:00 PM and didn't awake. If there's any good way to go, I guess that would be the best we could hope for. His body just gave up the fight, he was ravaged inside, and couldn't throw off the effects of the cancer anymore.

He was a very special person, not always easy to get along with, but a dedicated officer in the U.S. Navy. He had a very adventurous, inquiring personality. His expedition to the South Pole with the crew of the Que Sera-Sera was a crowning achievement in his career in the navy, although it was relatively early in his career. He never talked about it much, but his tour during the Korean War in the Straits of Formosa when he was flying patrol duty, was one of thjose harrowing experiences that most of the nation didn't realize was even going on at the time.

He described the shooting up of many Red Chinese patrol boats and submarines who's avowed purpose was to invade and conquer Nationalist China, who had taken refuge on the island of Formosa, now Taiwan. Long after it was over, I can remember him talking about the "Cuban Missile Crisis," in which he was involved as a pilot of a P2V flying submarine patrol in the Carribean. He said that if the people of the nation knew how close we came to nuclear war then they would have been as scared as the military.

According to him, "Key West had so much material stashed and combat-ready that it almost sank. (Reminiscent of the description of Britain before D-Day.)

For all this aggressive action in which he took part as a Naval Officer, he was as gentle a person as you could find. He and his wife, Nina adopted their two children and treated them as their own. There wasn't a more dedicated, family-oriented couple then they. He will be sorely misssed, and we can only hope that the dedicateion he had in his work and country can continue in others.

Dick's funeral will be held on Friday, August 9, 1996 at 9:00 AM, at Lake Lawn Metairie, 5100 Ponchartrain Boulevard, New Orleans. It will be a military funeral with a eulogy by Dick's nephew, Major Christopher Swadener, USAF, who recently arrived back in the states from duty in Turkey. I'll be in touch with you later.

Jim


Swadener, John Richard (Captain), on Monday, August 4, 1996. Age 68 years. Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home, New Orleans, LA. Interment in All Saints Mausoleum, New Orleans, LA. (8/7/96 ed.)




South Pole pilot says first landing was 'madness'

News-Journal Wire Services

PENSACOLA - The rescue by air of a cancer-stricken doctor from the South Pole with clockwork precision on Oct. 16 was nothing like the first landing and takeoff from the bottom of the Earth.

"It doesn't compare at all," said retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. C.S. Gus Shinn, the pilot for that flight 43 years ago Sunday. "In retrospect, it was sheer madness." Shinn nearly crashed on an exploratory flight a few days earlier. After landing at the pole the plane's skis froze to the ice in 60-below weather, but there was little of the fanfare that accompanied the recent rescue.

"There was a lot of hoopla and those guys were brave to do it," said retired Chief Petty Officer John Strider, Shinn's crew chief. "It's like maybe they overplayed it a little bit or were too careful." That was something Shinn and his crew could not be accused of. They flew 800 miles from McMurdo Sound on the Antarctic coast to the South Pole on Oct. 31, 1956, in an aging R4D, affectionately and sometimes derisively called a "Gooney Bird."

It was the Navy version of the piston-powered, twin-engine DC-3 airliner that had gone into service 20 years earlier. The R4D had none of the sophisticated navigation gear nor power of the four-engine, turboprop C-130 Hercules the New York Air National Guard used to pick up Dr. Jerri Nielsen from a research station at the South Pole last month.

Shinn, originally from Eden, N.C., was one of seven Navy men aboard the R4D, including Rear Adm. George Dufek. He was commander of Operation Deep Freeze, which was to establish the predecessor of the present polar research station for International Geophysical Year in 1956.

The 77-year-old Shinn, now living in Pensacola, recalled his flight in an interview at the National Museum of Naval Aviation where the plane is on display. It was named "Que Sera Sera" - Spanish for "Whatever will be, will be" - the title of a then-popular song. The name turned out to be very appropriate, Shinn said.

Just as the Air Guard did this year, the Navy waited for winter to wane before attempting a polar landing, although not long enough for Shinn. The Cold War had a literal meaning in the Antarctic. Dufek was in a hurry, worried the Russians might get there first.

An earlier flight in another R4D to seek a refueling site between McMurdo and the pole nearly ended in disaster. Flying into a valley, the plane got caught in a windshear and began falling. Fortunately, it was equipped with small rockets called JATO for jet-assisted take off. Shinn fired all 11 JATO bottles to stop the fall just as a wing tip hit the ice.

There was "lots of noise, lots of fuss" but damage was minor and the plane flew fine. Dufek, however, did not want to go to the pole with a bent wing tip so they borrowed "Que Sera Sera" from another crew. The polar landing was a bit rough, but not unusual for the terrain, recalled Strider, 69, from his home in Newport News, Va. Strider is the only other surviving member of the landing party.

Their JATO-assisted takeoff appeared uneventful to those watching from an Air Force C-124 Globemaster that circled overhead. It was not. The high altitude of the ice cap - about 10,000 feet at the pole - starved engines of oxygen and robbed wings of their lift. That, along with the plane's 28,000-pound weight, made JATO necessary to take off in the best situation.

The JATO bottles usually were fired after the plane hit 30 knots, but "Que Sera Sera" remained stuck with the engines at full power. "We just sat on the ice like an old mudhen," Shinn said. To break loose, Shinn fired four JATO bottles. That did the trick, but he was worried about having enough JATO left to get airborne. They barely made it only to be enveloped in ice and snow.

"We couldn't see anything, but that was no big deal," Shinn said. He relied on instruments to keep flying. Shinn and other Navy pilots quickly returned to deliver personnel and delicate equipment while the Air Force dropped heavy gear by parachute for the research station.

The Navy's Antarctic Development Squadron 6 kept flying ski-equipped planes to support research efforts until it was disbanded this March, and the New York Air Guard's 109th Airlift Wing assumed sole responsibility for polar flights. Over the years there were many close calls and accidents. Fifty Americans, military and civilian, have lost their lives in the Antarctic.

Shinn's Antarctic experience dates to 1947 when he flew there off an aircraft carrier with Rear Adm. Richard Byrd, who had made the first flight over the South Pole in 1929. Navy fliers took the liberty of naming Antarctic features, including the Pensacola Mountains for the naval air station in the Florida Panhandle as well as Mt. Shinn. Shinn also was to be inducted Friday as an honorary member of the Polar Society in recognition of his place in Antarctic history. "That flight," Shinn said, "is just representative of a lot of flying that people did and didn't get credit for."

The first aircraft landing at the South Pole at a glance: Date: Oct. 31, 1956. Aircraft: Navy Douglas R4D nicknamed "Que Sera" Crew: Expedition leader, Rear Adm. George Dufek, Rockford, Ill.; pilot, Lt. Cmdr. C.S. "Gus" Shinn, Eden, N.C.; co-pilot, Capt. William "Trigger" Hawkes, Jersey City, N.J.; Air Development Squadron 6 commander, Capt. Douglas L. Cordiner, Washington, D.C.; navigator, Lt. Richard Swadener, Elkhart, Ind.; radioman, W.A. Crumbi Jr., Pensacola, Fla.; crew chief, John Strider, Charleston, W.Va.

Purpose: Set the stage for building a polar research station as part of the International Geophysical Year. The station was rebuilt in 1975 after the ice cap shift and another rebuilt is slated for completion in 2002.

Historic significance: First airplane to land and take off from the South Pole, first people to set foot on the pole since a four-member sled expedition in 1912 led by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott, all of whom died trying to return to their base camp. Roald Amundsen and four fellow Norwegians were the first to make it to the South Pole using dog sleds and skis in 1911.

http://www.southpolestation.com/trivia/igy1/que1.html

[NI0294] As told by James L. Swadener:

.....I served in the U.S. Naval reserves from July 1947, until January 1952. I was never called to active duty, although I did go on two "cruises". The first of which was a 6-week "good will" tour to Buenos Aires, on board the destroyer USS George K. Mackenzie, and had liberty there and in Trinidad on the way back to Norfolk, VA. the second "cruise" I made on board the destroyer USS Fiske, which was a 2-week cruise in the Carribbrean, notably to Guantanoma Bay and Santiago de Cuba, where we also had Liberty. I have a picture of myself in uniform on the dock in Buenos Aires with a soldier of the Argentine Army.

This picture was taken in January 1948 on the dock at Buenos Aires, Argentina,
in the Rio de la Plata. As we were coming into the harbor, we could see the
hulk of the pocket battleship, Graf Spee which was scuttled off Montevideo,
Uruguay in (I think) 1941 after limping into port for repairs from an
engagement with a British task force. I'm told that the hulk is still visible
after these 57 years.

The other fellow in the picture is an Argentine soldier who was visiting our
ship, the U. S. S. George K. Mackenzie DD836 and the cruiser U. S. S. Albany
for which we were an escort. An open house was held on both ships while we
were berthed there, because it was a "good will" visit. No US warship had
visited there for a number of years. You'll notice the soldier's uniform, it
shows the influence of the collaboration the Argentines had with the
government of Germany before, during and after WWII.

There were many visitors to the two ships that were obviously expatriates from Nazi Germany. They were particularly interested in our radar, which was off limits to any visitor. These "expatriates" were very polite but gave themselves away, when they clicked their heels as a kind of salute when they boarded and disembarked the ships.

Almost every government employee was in uniform, and the uniforms were
very reminiscent of the Wermacht. They carried riding crops and Luger pistols,
and they didn't take any crap from anyone. The police were similarly attired,
some wore German pot helmets and all drove American Jeeps.

Thanks again,
Jim

[NI0314] Daniel Horace was a farmer and resided near New Midway, Maryland

[NI0373] Walter Sweadner and the Wild Silk Moths of the
Bitteroot Mountains

By Michael M. Collins

Sixty years ago a Carnegie Museum entomologist studied natural hybrid moths, and today his work on the fundamental process in evolution-speciation-is considered a classic. The soft fluttering noise of their wings against the screen sides of the trap awakened me. Peering out of my sleeping bag, I could see the ghostly image of several large moths, distinctively marked with white bands and large eyespots against a background of rich burgundy. New arrivals gently drifted in, and then in a frenzy began flying and crawling around the caged
female. Incredibly, these western relatives of the familiar eastern Cecropia moth are able to fly in the early summer predawn cold of the Bitterroot Mountains of Idaho and Montana. Their furry bodies hold in heat generated by flight muscles as they pursue the pheromone trails released by unmated females. But, beyond this surreal spectacle of flying creatures, it was the shape of the eyespots that arrested my sleepy concentration. I could tell even in the dim light that there was something unique about these beautiful insects.

I was first drawn into pursuing this particular group of wild silk moths a quarter of a century earlier by a small book, a monograph published by the Carnegie Museum, stapled between drab cardboard covers but telling a story that I found exciting as a bookish high-school student fascinated by collecting and rearing moths and butterflies. During the Depression the author, Walter R. Sweadner, undertook what must have been a difficult and probably dangerous journey. Driving a Model T truck alone from Pittsburgh to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, he traveled along crude roads to collect these wild silk moths in rugged mountain terrain. Today, along interstate highways one can retrace Sweadner's journey, casually stopping to read historical markers describing the hardships of the Lewis and Clark expedition which traversed part of the same route. At Lookout Pass, where Sweadner made his base camp, a ski shop now offers café latte to weekend visitors from Seattle and Spokane.

Sixty years ago the loggers and miners Sweadner met along his route must have found his protective gear, collecting net and traveling laboratory a humorous diversion from their daily hardships. But, with no effective treatment for Rocky Mountain spotted fever available at that time, Sweadner knew that a bite from an infected tick could cost him his life. Prior to the young scientist's departure, a newspaper article entitled "Young Sharpsburg Scientist to Risk Life in Studies" included a photograph of Sweadner encased in a cumbersome outfit, a heavy coat with special elastic neck and wrist closures, long pants with leggings, high-top leather boots, and a gauze veil draped over his hat. Such garb in the early summer sun must have been unbearably hot, and Sweadner probably dressed more casually during most of his field work, keeping a watchful eye out for ticks. Later in his career, his early precautions against ticks yielded an unexpected reward.

Sweadner believed the moths he studied in the Bitterroot Mountains were natural hybrids, formed as their parent species reinvaded the Northwest after the Ice Age from their southern refuges in the Sierra Nevada of California, and from the southern Rocky Mountains. The West Coast species, known as the Ceanothus Silk Moth, is a bright red-brown with long, comma-shaped eyespots on its hind wings. The Rocky Mountain species is similar but easily distinguished by its darker wine-red color and small, kidney- shaped eyespots. Sweadner carefully measured the shape of these eyespots and recorded the wing colors, and plotted out figures and charts showing that the Bitterroot moths were intermediate between these two species for these characters. He also matched his wild naturally hybrid Bitterroot specimens with laboratory hybrids produced by the parental species.

His classic paper is the first detailed study of what are now called "hybrid zones."1 Hybrid zones intrigue
evolutionary biologists because they occur only when two populations just on the verge of evolving into discrete
species meet by chance and interbreed in nature. Matings between more closely related forms would likely produce only a subtle blending or intergradation of those features taxonomists might otherwise use to classify them as a separate species. True hybrid zones have distinct borders where such characters change abruptly. If allowed to evolve separately for a greater length of time, a contact between the same two forms would allow them to coexist side by side without interbreeding.

Ironically, in 1937, the same year Sweadner's monograph appeared, the noted Russian-born geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky published Genetics and the Origin of Species, a landmark book on evolution. At the time the insights of Dobzhansky's book were unavailable to Sweadner, but subsequent editions cited Sweadner's work as a study of speciation in progress. As Darwin stressed in his Origin of Species, the formation of species is the fundamental branching point in evolution. Yet, without an understanding of the nature of inheritance, Darwin believed that the concept of the species was essentially a naturalist's abstraction, due to the gradual nature of evolution and the continuous variation seen among geographic races of many organisms. Dobzhansky defined species in terms of natural populations, united by the ability to interbreed and produce offspring, but reproductively isolated from closely related groups.

Sweadner's work was significant because he revealed that during speciation two forms can evolve many obvious physical differences, yet retain the ability to interbreed and produce hybrids in the wild.

He recognized that in these cases the concept of the species is arbitrary: "Man has always tried to classify the many and diverse forms of life into discrete groups. When the species...tend to intergrade so that it becomes impossible to fix limits...a new basis for differentiation is proposed." In his concluding remarks he notes that, "The genus...is an excellent example to illustrate the futility of attempting to set up rigid universal criteria for defining the limits of species." Sixty years later controversy continues to stimulate intense research on the process of speciation, and hybrid zones are seen as important laboratories for this work.

Sweadner's path in Pittsburgh soon crossed that of another Russian émigré biologist, Andrey Avinoff, who was born into wealth, and once served a diplomatic role in the czar's court.2 Sweadner was born in 1903 in more humble circumstances in Beaver, Pennsylvania, where he graduated from high school. In 1927 he earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Carnegie Tech. During college he suffered from rheumatic fever and spent a year recovering in Long Beach, California, with his aunt and uncle. For relaxation he resumed an early interest in collecting butterflies, and upon his return to Pittsburgh changed his major to biology, earning a master's degree in biology in 1931, and a Ph.D. in 1934 based on his research with hybridization in wild silk moths. Sweadner met his future wife, Marie Whaling, at the Erie campus, where he taught biology (from 1935 until 1941) and where she was an instructor in English. They were married in June 1941 and in July he was offered $2500 per year to be a curator of Entomology at the Carnegie Museum. He continued as an assistant professor of Zoology at the University of Pittsburgh.

During the war years, in addition to his other responsibilities, Sweadner taught the mathematics of navigation to Army Air Corps trainees, putting in 70 to 80 hours a week on occasion. Eventually, this stressful schedule took its toll and Sweadner suffered a heart attack. Although he recovered completely, Marie told me during an interview that his sacrifices made him "as much a war casualty as anyone." After the war, the Sweadners bought a house in the Point Breeze section of Pittsburgh. Remodeling the house was an escape from the tedium of his profession, and Sweadner, an accomplished craftsman, built custom cabinetry, including unusual kitchen cabinets with roll-up doors, a central heating system built into the various fireplace chimneys, and replicas of early American furniture built without modern fasteners. Examples now in Marie Sweadner's home in southern California include a bedstead beautifully decorated with inlaid designs of butterflies and a table with an intricate spiral mosaic of wood pieces. Sweadner housed his personal Lepidoptera collection of 40,000 specimens in cabinets and drawers of his own making.

Sweadner gained a reputation as a scientist and educator, and worked hard to promote Carnegie Museum in exhibits he helped create. He wrote several articles for Carnegie Magazine and stories about him appeared in the local papers over the years. Through their mutual interest in Lepidoptera, Sweadner and Avinoff became close associates. Avinoff had earlier served on Sweadner's thesis committee and was director of the Natural History Museum from 1928 to 1945. On March 1, 1941, Avinoff appointed Sweadner assistant curator of Entomology and advanced him to curator the next year. The noted lepidopterist Charles Remington wrote of Sweadner concerning this period that "He was faced with the heavy task of organizing and arranging the lepidoptera collection-left in a chaotic state by its principal assembler, W. J. Holland."

Avinoff had earlier amassed a valuable and unique collection of Old World butterflies, including an extensive series from Central Asia. Forced to leave Russia following the revolution, Avinoff had to abandon most of his possessions, and his Lepidoptera collection was appropriated by the Soviets. Following World War II, negotiations led to a plan to retrieve the collection, the trip to be funded by the prominent Mellon family, but Cold War tensions caused the Soviets to renege. Through trading and purchase Avinoff managed to build up a near duplicate collection, most of which was donated to Carnegie Museum.

Among these specimens were long series of Karanasa, a satyrid butterfly from the mountains of Tibet and nearby regions. The pattern of geographic variation in this group suggests an interesting evolutionary history. Repeated cycling of glaciation followed by periods of warmth during the Pleistocene epoch appears to have continually split these butterflies into small populations, isolated from each other by rugged terrain. During warmer periods these populations expanded and interbred with their neighbor

The Karanasa were another example of hybridization among borderline species in mountainous terrain, and Sweadner drew upon his earlier work to begin an eight-year collaboration with Avinoff on an extensive monograph of the systematic relationships among these butterflies. Sweadner's analytic and quantitative approach, based on his engineering background, contrasted with and complemented Avinoff's worldly, more philosophical intellect. Both men were unfettered by the narrow viewpoint of many contemporary taxonomists, who regarded animal species as essentially uniform throughout their range, and unchanging over time until replaced by a new species. In April 1945 Avinoff suffered a heart attack, and had to retire from the museum. Although he continued work on the monograph as its principal author, it was still unfinished when Avinoff
died in July 1949.

Using Avinoff's notes and manuscripts, Sweadner completed the Karanasa monograph in 1950. He was aided in his efforts to secure funding for this project by an unlikely agent, a lowly wood tick. A prominent trustee of the Carnegie Museum, James C. Rea, brought in a tick that had fastened itself to his skin. He was referred to Sweadner, who knew from his research in connection with preparations for the Bitterroot field trip that the tick was not of a type that transmitted serious disease. After reassuring the man, the two exchanged pleasantries and Sweadner discussed his work at the museum, including his project with the Karanasa. Later during a meeting with fellow prominent Pittsburghers, Rea was asked if he knew of any useful museum projects in need of funding. He related the story of Walter Sweadner and the tick, and subsequently a grant was given to Carnegie Museum by Mrs. Henry R. Rea to support the publication of the Karanasa monograph. Today the legacy of the "tick grant" continues in the form of the Rea Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Near the end of this project, Sweadner's health deteriorated and he was diagnosed with colon cancer. Although an operation to remove the cancer was considered successful, a postoperative infection led to complications and Sweadner was again hospitalized. Proofs of the color plates of the Karanasa paper were brought to his bedside for correction and comment. Despite a rushed publication schedule, the book was not printed and bound until just after Sweadner's death, at age 47, on January 13, 1951. Marie Sweadner eventually moved to California, where she resumed her teaching career and raised their two children. Retired now, she is an avid amateur naturalist and bird watcher.

Just four years after Sweadner's death the chemical structure of DNA was discovered, and the new discipline of molecular genetics began to develop. With the advent of computers, population geneticists were able to study the origin and maintenance of the unexpected genetic variation the molecular geneticists were finding in natural animal populations. By the late 1960s the concept of the population as the unit of evolution began to be accepted, just as Sweadner and Avinoff had proposed for the Karanasa. Hybrid zones were now seen as natural laboratories for the study of the process of speciation.

Inspired by Sweadner's earlier work, I discovered and analyzed a hybrid zone between the same two silk moths on the east slope of the California Sierra Nevada, near Lake Tahoe. Unlike laboratory hybrids between these species, in which the female is barren of eggs, I found that natural hybrid females here and in the Bitterroot Mountains are fertile. Within the bounds of the hybrid zone, evolution has partly reversed the trend toward the formation of distinct species.

Such a discovery would have fascinated Sweadner. One wonders what contributions he would have made during our current renaissance in evolutionary biology.

Michael M. Collins is a scientific research associate of the section of Invertebrate Zoology at Carnegie Museum of
Natural History. He is coauthor, with Paul Tuskes and James Tuttle, of Wild Silk Moths of North America (Cornell
University Press, 1996) and is publishing his recent research on natural hybrids in the Annals of Carnegie Museum.

The museum has in all of its scientific departments a total of 149 research associates around the world, who share their research and contribute scientific information with the museum.


Notes

1. Hybridization and the phylogeny of the genus Platysamia, Annals of the Carnegie Museum, 1937.

2. "Andrey Avinoff Remembered," by Nicholas Shoumatoff, Carnegie Magazine, March/April 1995.

[NI0406] Submitted by Veronica Alice Swadener-Kolomichuk

He died 7/31/00 at home in Flagstaff from Leukemia/Malignant Melanoma. There was no way to treat one without the worsening the other. So, he just crammed a bunch of living into his last days. The Lord granted him the blessing of relative health and a voracious appetite to be able to travel. He went to Maine, California (for Michaels wedding) and here to see us. He and Grace got to go to Myrtle Beach for their 25th (and visited JeanAnne and ?? another cousin-Norma Jeans daughters there too) We buried him at All Faiths Cemetery in Tucson AZ.

My Grandfather was living with my dad until my dads cancer diagnosis in March/April. He knew his health would be failing and wouldn't be able to take care of Grandpa so he flew him back east. He is in a nursing home in Butler PA near Norma Jean. Don and Norma came out to AZ to be with Dad and Grandpa back when we were all thinking it would be grandpa to go first. He was actually pretty healthy then. Able to carry on conversation, walk and eat. I haven't heard anything different.

Melvin Duane Swadener
Sierra Vista Herald / August 3, 2000

March 4, 1931 - July 31, 2000

Melvin passed away in the company of his loving family. He went to be with the Lord after a courageous battle with cancer.

A native of Newcastle, Pa., he joined the U.S. Air Force in 1951. He served his country honorably for 21 years and is a decorated Vietnam veteran. He retired a technical sergeant at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in 1973. Melvin was an industrious man with a high work ethic. He managed Roys Rug Service and a Phillips 66 in Tucson from 1973 to 1976.

He resided in Sierra Vista from 1976 to 1990. While there, he owned and managed Mels Auto Parts. He was active at St. Andrews Mission Church and formed Boy Scout Troop 475. He was part of the Wal-Mart management team and was transferred to Colorado from 1990 to 1994. From 1994 to present, he resided in Flagstaff, Ariz., and worked at the Arizona Daily Sun and Connellys Market until full retirement last August.

He is survived by his beloved wife of 25 years, Grace Fridye Swadener; their children, Michael (Lisa) Swadener of La Quinta, Calif., Marcus (Terri) Swadener of Phoenix, Ariz., and Melanie Swadener of Flagstaff; his children from a prior marriage to Stella Franco, Veronica (Gary) Kolomichuck of Fayetteville, N.C., Pamela (Peter) Davenport of Harpswell, Maine, Steven Swadener of Tucson, Ariz.; and 13 grandchildren. He also leaves behind his father, George Swadener; sister, Norma Flickner; brother, Don Swadener, all of Pennsylvania; and many loving nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his mother, Alice Uselton Swadener, and infant son, David Swadener.

His cremated remains will be interred at Our Lady of the Desert Cemetery. There will be a memorial service at 9 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 4, at Chapel One, 5385 E. Ironwood, Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson. He will be buried with military honors and will be greatly missed.

[NI0410] Gary is stationed at Pope AFB also. He is with the 24th Special Tactics
Squadron.

[NI0430] From and e-mail by DavidPenman.

The biggest news that I have failed to relay to you is that Wayne Hawkins, my sister Theresa's husband, died on November 19. He made a trip to Sudan with a missionary to preach the gospel to the troops of the South Sudanese rebel army...I guess they are referred to as rebels. The U.S. is funding their operation against the Muslim north...Anyway, he came back in early November and felt fine. After a couple of weeks he felt like the flu was coming on. He didn't want to go to the doctor and he didn't. He got weaker and on the 19th in the evening he was on his way back to bed and collapsed and died. Theresa felt so bad that they didn't take him to the doctor. However, the medical examiner told her it wouldn't have done any good anyway. He had gotten a super strain of malaria when he was in Sudan. They even had to quaratine his body for a time. We surely do miss him, but we also know that the Lord had a plan for his life and it was His will.
There was a wedding on May 23 too. Steven...the second oldest of the 14 children got married...to Andrea Mayfield.

[NI0432] As told by David Keith Penman, brother of Laura Penman and husband of Roland.

Roland died of complications from a hernia operation. He drank neavily and used cocaine and was told to lay off during his recovery. He didn't listen and it killed him. In fact, the doctors told him to put off the operation, because his body couldn't handle it. At one point he was in a coma, that should have scared him, but it didn't and things got worse. My personal opinion is that she is better off without him, I haven't asked her about that, but think she may feel the same way. She is a great mother, home schools her children, etc. She moved down to Klamath Falls about a year ago (1995) to be near our parents for a change. The house they were living in, in Kirkland was owned by her in-laws and they lived next door. After her husband died, they told her she could live rent free in the house as long as she wanted, but that message became less clear as time went on and she decided to move south.

[NI0459] Work in the insurance industry as a Unit Claims Manager. I specialized in large injury claims. Been divorced for nearly
20 years and never remarried. My 4 kids are all grown and I have three grandchildren and another on the way. Considering all, the past 30
years have been pretty good to me.

[NI0497] As told by James L. Swadener.

The photo is of my oldest brother Robert Francis Swadener, he was a Staff Sargeant in the Marine Corps during WWII. He never served overeas, but he was a radar technician in an outfit that entrained fro San Francisco from Cherry Point, North Carolina on V-J Day 1945. They found out when they got to San Francisco that they were scheduled to be in the first wave of the invasion of Japan. Their mission was to land on an island in Tokoy Bay to setup a radar Station to guard the landing craft in their invasion of the mainland. Of course, the mission was aborted. He said many times that he was glad he missed it.

[NI0499] As told by James L. Swadener:

My younger brother Philip Moran Swadener was in the U.S. Marine Corp Reserves and was called up during the Korean (War) Conflict. He served in (the) artillery in the Punch Bowl region in North Korea.

[NI0523] Kathy Swadener, Class of '69, lost her mother December 8, 2005. Virginia "Ginny" (Rea) Swadener died at her home in Normain Heights; she was 76. For 25 years, Mrs. Swadener was the "Puppet Lady" who did weekly puppet shows for children in Mishawaka's elementary schools and libraries. Because of her work, she was honored with Teachers Credit Union's "Michiana 55-Plus Volunteer Award for Education" in 2003. She also served as part of a group that decided how United Way dollars are spent in the community. She was a member of the MHS Class of '48 and St. Monica's Church. Mrs. Swadener was also the mother of Terry Swadener (Class of '70), Kurt Swadener (Class of '71), Mark Swadener (Class of '72), Mary Swadener (Class of '75), Andrew Swadener (Class of '77), and John Swadener (Class of '87). Kathy's father (MHS '47) survives.

[NI0574] Elizabeth (Beth) (Blue) Swadener is a FullBright Scholar, a Full Professor at Kent State University and has traveled to Africa 4 or 5 times (according to Jim Swadener, Daniel Swadener's uncle)

Published Sunday, January 21, 2001, in the Akron Beacon Journal. Area residents join anti-Bush outcry

Demonstrators in Akron stage mock inaugural Beacon Journal staff report

As George W. Bush took the oath of office yesterday to become the nation's 43rd president, local residents added their voices to those in protest rallies across the country decrying Bush's election and the state of U.S. democracy.

Holding signs with sayings such as, ``Your ignorance, their power'' and ``Hail to the thief,'' the handful of protesters marched from the University of Akron's Polsky Building to the Federal Building downtown. There, at the same time Bush was delivering his inaugural address, the protesters staged what they called ``a mock InaugurAuction.''

Protesters argued that corporate interests and other big-money contributors now control the electoral process, and that the poor and elderly -- forced to use faulty voting systems -- are being disenfranchised. ``It's a real crisis,'' said Greg Coleridge, director of the Economic Justice and Empowerment Program for the American Friends Service Committee in Akron, and an organizer of the march. ``We need to take back our government.''

``Organize! Organize! Organize!'' chanted protesters from local unions and other groups after Joy Roliff of Akron, dressed as the Statue of Liberty, spoke to the group. Protesters in Washington, D.C. this weekend also called for changes in the electoral process, saying the
controversy over this year's disputed presidential election offers an opportunity to improve voting systems and scrap the Electoral College.

Beth Swadener of Akron, a professor of early childhood education at Kent State University, attended the rally with a sign saying, ``Election 2000: A Coup for Corporate Interests and a Partisan Supreme Court.'' It was a reference, in part, to the legal wrangling after Election Day that led to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to halt a Florida recount and affirm Bush's narrow win over Democrat Al Gore.

[NI0575] Youngsters who are independent and outspoken often encounter clashes in school By Thrity Umrigar Knight-Ridder Newspapers

AKRON, Ohio - In a different world, these children would be valued and heard. Their peers would respect their courage; their teachers would encourage their precocious individuality. School officials would try to figure out how not to snuff out the light that burns so fiercely in their young hearts. But, as these free-spirited children know only too well, this is not that different world.

"The school system is absolutely not designed for creativity," says Tom Yamokoski, an Akron psychologist. "Quietness, going along with the flow, keeping order - this is what's encouraged. It's tough to find a school system that encourages not being the same." Indeed, a regimented world can chew up free thinkers like pieces of paper. In today's world, a young Thoreau or a Virginia Woolf might easily be
branded a weirdo, a troublemaker, a misfit, a problem child. Sam Paterson, a 14-year-old student at Davey Junior High in Kent, Ohio, has sure been called all those names. He listened to the beat of a different drummer very early in life. Even in first grade, his strong verbal skills, creativity and rebelliousness set him apart from the others. He resisted the rigidity of school life and once even got in trouble for using the wrong shade of red crayon to color a picture.

A sympathetic school counselor summed up the boy: "He's very right-brained and he does have to live in this left-brained world." Sam's mother, Alice Paterson, a poet who teaches part time at Kent State University, remembers the transformation her happy, joyful boy went
through after starting school. "It was painful for me to watch him in first grade," she says. "Because he lost his joy. Used to be, he'd be happy all the time. And that went away."

Logistics dictate that school systems cater to the majority of children rather than to a nonconformist minority. Many schools do offer some kind of program for gifted children, but even these programs may not meet the needs of kids like Sam. "If you have 25 students in a room, the norm is going to be the majority in the room," says Gary Sipps, a Tallmadge, Ohio psychologist. "Those at the opposite ends of the spectrum may not fit in."

Sipps says parents can help these children by keeping lines of communication with them open so that they are not intervening only at times of crisis. And they need to make sure a child is not acting out because of a problem like alcoholism, abuse or illness. If the child is a misfit at school, Sipps advises parents to involve the child in different activities and groups outside the school. But if the child is happier
being a loner, there's nothing wrong with that. "There are individual differences in humans," he says. "Kids are human, too. They vary from each other."

Sam's life really began to get complicated in third grade, when, as if to give physical manifestation to the difference he always felt, he stopped getting haircuts. At one point, his hair was down to his waist. That started the name-calling and teasing that followed him into adolescence. Strangers would deliberately ask, "Are you a boy or a girl?" His parents were torn between wanting to protect him from the ridicule and not squelching his need for self-expression. "Sam was very obstinate and self-determined from a very young age, says his father, John Paterson, a computer software engineer. "I didn't want to beat him down. But I would talk with him a lot and tell him there are all kinds of situations you have to deal with in the world."

The Patersons also have a 7-year-old daughter, Rosie. Although the siblings are close, they are very different. Both children are honor-roll students, but Rosie is athletic, much more logical in her thinking, and quiet in class. Although children like Sam can feel very isolated, Yamokoski, the Akron psychologist, says many of them wear their outsider status as a badge of courage. That's certainly true for Sam. He wears a T-shirt that says, "The Government is Lying." On his wrist, he has printed the name of the Argentine-born Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara. His hair, which he cut last year, is still down to his shoulders.

Sam says what sets him apart from his peers is, "They're pleased too easily." If the teasing over his long hair has hurt, Sam doesn't show it. "The teasing was because of fear," he says. "The fear of what's different. I just felt like an outsider. I didn't know why. But I knew where I stood." Rachel Swadener, a 16-year-old senior at Ellet High School in Akron, also knows where she stands -and pays a price for it.

Unlike many of her peers, Rachel speaks up any time she is confronted by remarks that she believes are racist, sexist or homophobic - irrespective of whether those remarks are made by a fellow student or a teacher. For this, Rachel has been labeled "the P.C. (politically correct) girl," by her classmates. "Sometimes they make fun of me before I even open my mouth," Rachel says. "Mostly I just turn my back. Usually I'm too tired in school to care. Sometimes it hurts. But if I take it personally, then it becomes about me and not the issue."
Recently, one of Rachel's teachers made what she considered a homophobic remark in class. "I was so angry," she says. "There was not a single person appalled by it. I couldn't believe that. Even my friends didn't see it. I wrote across my notebook, 'I lost all respect for my teacher today.' I was crying when I got home."

After talking with one of her mother's friends, Rachel wrote her teacher a letter. She told him that his students respected him and expected respect in return. She quoted statistics showing the high suicide rate among gay teens. Though she's an honors student in an accelerated program that will let her finish high school in three years, Rachel has had other run-ins with school officials. She gathered about 500 signatures protesting a school policy that forbid students from coloring their hair unnatural colors. And at last year's homecoming dance, she went with a boy who wore a prom dress. She wore a tuxedo. "I did it to bend the rules," she says. "And shock value can be fun."

Rachel's parents, Beth and Daniel Swadener, have always encouraged their daughter to speak out on behalf of minorities. But they take different approaches in counseling their daughter. "They both listen to me," says Rachel. "Mom really tries to find a way to fix it. Dad sits back and listens to me." Beth Swadener, who is an associate professor of early childhood education at Kent State University, agrees: "I theorize about it, get nervous, get angst about the issues, and take them on. Daniel helps us lighten up and get some distance from it."

Both parents are vigilant when it comes to their daughter's emotional health. "I'd rather she be angry and express it in a safe way," Beth Swadener says. "Rage to me is healthier than withdrawal and self-blame." Daniel Swadener, an art consultant, says he accepts the fact that he cannot protect his daughter from the hurts of the world. "I don't feel a loss as a parent if I can't help her," he says. "I don't have the answers for all those things."

Sipps says parents of children like Sam and Rachel can protect their children by giving them "unconditional love, a feeling of value, and a warm home environment." He also recommends reading books like "Raising Your Spirited Child" by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka (Harper Perennial) and "The Drama of the Gifted Child" by Alice Miller (Basic Books). Kids who don't fit in with their peers because of personality disorders or damaged home lives may carry those problems into adulthood, though therapy at a young age may help fend off some of their problems, Sipps says.

On the other hand, kids who are misfits because of their creativity, individuality or intellectual curiosity, often grow up to be successful adults. "The same things that got me in trouble in grade school and high school made me a star student in college," Yamokoski says. "I was always ready to question what I was told. I finally got in a position where that was accepted." For Sam, a turning point in his life came a few years ago when he discovered music. He started taking guitar lessons and found his niche.

"School's better than it used to be," he says. "Things are better because of my music, really. I picked up my guitar and became preoccupied with other stuff. I look forward to the time after school." Now Sam dreams of someday making films and writing his own musical scores.
His father has noticed his son's new-found discipline. "Music was a focus," John Paterson says. "He got a lot of joy out of it. He seems to know what he wants to do with his life."

Though their children have caused them heartaches, both the Patersons and the Swadeners say they are proud of their headstrong children -and that their children have taught them a lot. "Sam being who he is has helped me," Alice Paterson says. "It's given me permission to be more of who I am." Her words are echoed by Beth Swadener: "Rachel has a very sensitive radar for oppression. She has pushed me to do more." Yamokoski says once they find their place in the sun, teen-agers like Sam and Rachel grow up to be happy, well-adjusted and successful adults. "Sometimes, they even grow up to be psychologists," he says.

(c) 1997, Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio). Distributed by Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services.

[NI0625] Charles Todd Strozyk was born December 19, 1968 at 10:51 A.M. He weighed in at 6 lbs, 15oz.

[NI0629] Jeffery Robert Jackson was born September 6, 1963. He weighted in at 7 lbs, 11 1/2oz.

[NI0630] Copied from The Willapa Herald, Wednesday, February 27, 2002, page 5

Obituaries

Richard Jay Rohr, 65, a Centralia resident for the past 30 years, died February 21st at Harbor View Medical Center in Seattle. He was born September 25, 1936, in Faulkton, SD, to Harry and Martha (Wudel) Rohr.

He attended Willapa Valley High School. He loved the rodeo, studying his family's history, traveling to the old fmily homesteads in South Dakota and Iowa. He enjoyed ranching on the family farm. He is preceded in death by a brother Bill.

Survivors include four daughters; Laurie May of South Bend, Sandy Stagelman of Anchorage, Alaska, Holly Wagoner of Middleton, ID, and Gina Jordan of Onalaska; two sons; Bryan Rohr of Soldotna, Alaska, and Jeff Rohr of Onalaska; two brothers Jerry Rohr of Raymond and Bruce Rohr of Centralia; a sister Barbara Brundstad of Raymond; and twenty-one grandchildren.

Graveside services were held Monday, February 25th, at the Fern Hill Cemetery in Menlo. Arrangements are in care of Stoller's Mortuary in Raymond.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Lewis County Chronicle Saturday, February 23
Richard 'Dick' Rohr

Centralia resident Richard "Dick" Rohr died Thursday, Feb. 21, at Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, as the result of an automobile accident on Old Highway 99 in South Thurston County. He was 65.

Rohr was born Sept. 25, 1936, at Faulkton, S.D., to Harry and Martha Rohr, and attended Willapa Valley Schools. He had been a Lewis County resident for more than 30 years. Rohr's enjoyments were the rodeo, genealogy, traveling to the old family homesteads in
South Dakota and Iowa, and spending time with his family and friends. His survivors said his most peaceful times were spent at the ranch, and that he had a witty personality.

His parents and a brother, Bill, preceded him in death. Survivors include four daughters, Laurie May of South Bend, Sandy Stagelman of
Anchorage, Alaska, Holly Wagoner of Middleton, Idaho, and Gina Jordan of Onalaska; two sons, Bryan of Soldotna, Alaska, and Jeff of Onalaska; his sister, Barbara Brunstad of Raymond; two brothers, Jerry of Raymond, and Bruce of Centralia; and 21 grandchildren.

Arrangements are under the direction of Stoller's Mortuary, Raymond. A graveside service for Richard "Dick" Rohr will begin at 11 a.m. Monday in Fern Hill Cemetery, Menlo. A reception for his family and friends will follow at Willapa Community Church, Old Willapa.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from the Olympian February 23, 2002
THURSTON COUNTY

Log truck strikes car, killing one

A Centralia man died Thursday after a collision on Old Highway 99 S.W.

Richard J. Rohr, 65, was pulling out of a private drive in the 18600 block when
he was struck by an eastbound Peterbilt log truck. Rohr was flown to
Harborview Medical Center in Seattle after the 8:20 a.m. accident. He died at
10:05 a.m. The road was wet from rain at the time of the collision.

[NI0631] Gina Marie was born March 23, 1966 at 11:01 A.M. She weighed 5 lbs 9 oz.

Gina's two youngest daughters play basketball for the Onalaska team, they both starters and pretty darn good players. Macy the oldest of the two, had to have all four wisdom teeth pulled on Friday. On Wednesday night Mandy broke her foot in the fourth quarter. (The second quarter, a girl on the other team, put her elbow in Mandy's eye and almost knocked her out. She has a nice shiner. Mandy has to go in for surgery this coming Wednesday and they have to put two pins in her little toe and her second toe. She will be out the rest of the season. Macy will probably be back in a couple of weeks. The coach is really upset. The team had a good chance of going to state. This is Macy's last year, but Mandy has two more years to go. (Girl's basketball isn't what it use to be.)

[NI0633] Friday, June 25, 1999, time 0936, Harrison Memorial Hospital, Bremerton, Kitsap County, Washington. Christopher Quinn Fagan, second Child (son) is born to Mark Richard Fagan and Courtney Ann Swadener-Fagan. In addition to Mark Fagan and also in attendance of the birth were Sharon Renee Swadener, older sister of Courtney, and Morris Gail Swadener Jr., father of Courtney.

[NI0636] Copied from newspaper clipping:

Erik Peterson Yields To Long Illness

Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the Sticklin Funeral parlors, Chehalis, for Erik Jalmer Peterson, 56, who died at a Centralia hospital Saturday after a long illness. Burial was in Claquato cemetery, Chehalis.

Peterson's death was not unexpected as he had been a hospital patient for the last three years and in ill health since 1941. Surviving are his wife, Ethel, Raymond; son, Orville, Mill Valley, California; three daughters, Mrs. Grace Johnson, Roseville, California, Mrs. Leora Hamilton and Mrs. Helen Flemetis, both of this city; two sisters, Mrs. Anna Leninger, residing in Kansas, and Mrs. Emil Leniger, Oakville, two brothersWilliam, Chehalis and Ed., residing in Southern Oregon, and 11 grandchildren.

[NI0637] Copied from funeral services memorial card

In memory out Ethel Peterson Vinyerd
Feb. 23, 1898-March 12, 1973
Services from Strickland's Funeral Chapel Thursday, March 15, 1973
Clergy: Rev. William Mayoh
Soloist: William P. Womack
Selections: "In the Garden" "The Old Rugged Cross"
Casket Bearers: Ron Flemetis, Randy Flemetis, Erik Peterson, Gene Borge, Dick Rohr, Charles Strozyk
Internment: Sunset Memorial Gardens, Chehalis, Washington
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Obituary as if appeared in the Raymond Herald - date unknown

Obituaries: Mrs. Ethel Peterson Vinyerd

Raymond - Mrs. Ethel Peterson Vinyerd, 75, died Monday at a Centralia nursing home following a lengthy illness.

Mrs. Vinyerd was a resident of Raymond since 1942 and wa a former 41-year resident of Chehalis-Adna area.

She was born February 23, 1898, in Rosseau, Minnesota, and was a member of the Chehalis Rebekah Lodge, the Eagles Auxiliary and the Adna Grange. Survivors include a son, Orville E. Peterson, Navato, California; three daughters, Mrs. Lawrence (Leora) Hamilton, and Mrs. George (Helen) Flemetis, both of Raymond, and Mrs. Robert (Grace) Johnson, Roseville, California; three brothers, Lewis Kitchel, Tumwater; Lloyd Kitchel, Forks, and Edward Kitchel, Olympia; three sisters, Mrs. May Brown, Chehalis; Mrs. Laura Foley, Mytrle Creek, Oregon and Mrs. Leona Kinnaman, Salkum, 14 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren.

Services will be Thursday at 1:30 P.M. at the New Stricklin Funeral Home. Graveside services at Sunset Memorial Gardens, Chehalis, will be under the auspices of the Raymond Rebekah Lodge.

[NI0639] Copied from Adna High School All School Reunion - 1992

Grace Peterson JohnsonClass of 1940

Prophecy:Noted Fashion Designer Presents New Styles

The fashion trends for next year were previewed last evening when noted fashion designer Grace Peterson unveils her new fall creations at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel Ballroom in New York City. Skirts were definitely on the upswing according to Ms. Peterson, whose creations have been trendsetters for the last four years.

Grace was working at Safeway in Olympia, Washington when a good-looking young Warrant Officer stationed with the Army at Fort Lewis dropped into buy a candy bar. Shortly thereafter, in 1943 to be exact, they were married and she became Mrs. Warrant Officer Robert Johnson. They moved to Mississippi for 1 1/2 years prior to Robert being shipped overseas.

One day, Grace was walking down the street in downtown Hattiesburg, Mississippi when she spotted a tall, handsome, familiar looking sailer approaching. It was Jim Willis, Joy Browning's husband.

Robert return from Germany in 1946 and they moved to Roseville, California; his hometown. He went to work in the offices of Southern Pacific Railroad. After their oldest daughter of Virginia was born, she started a babysitting service in her home when she has done to this day.

They bought a trucking camper 1965. They traveled all over the country and loved it. On a trip to Lake Powell they ran into two of Grace Cousins, Edith and Carrie Lininger from good old Adna High School. Their travels range from the Mexican border towns to Dawson Creek, Canada where they were caught in a hail storm. A hail storm for the size of cannibals; well he sounded like it inside the camper!

In 1976 they decided to move back to God's country, green trees, screen grass and rained with no pH value. Robert transferred to Albany, Oregon. He retired five years later. He passed away the next year.

Grace enjoys gardening and crocheting things for seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. She still like to travel north to visit relatives in Washington state and especially enjoys going way up north to Alaska to visit her daughters are Audrey and Debbie and their families.

Looking back, Grace is only regret is that her daughters were unable to go to school at Adna, where they would have had thirty or less students in each class instead of the three hundred under its student classes they had in California.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Answers for Daughter Debby:

I also asked her about living with Aunt Reah and Uncle Lou and she said she lived there for two years while she was in high school. She stayed there because of her asthma. She stayed there because her asthma didn't react there like she did at home (probably because of the cats they had at home). She said the picture that you sent with them and Lois and Mackey was probably taken the end of the summer that Grandma and Grandpa went to Alaska to fish. Her and Leora spent the summer with Aunt Reah and Uncle Lou and Helen spent the summer somewhere else. She told me, but I forgot. Anyway, since Orville was in the picture, she said she thought it was taken when they got back from Alaska (he went with them) and were picking up Leora and Mom, before they went to pick up Helen. She did graduate from Adna, spent the last year of high school at home, but two years she went to Onalaska high.

By the way, I don't know if you know it, but that was the summer that Orville met Zola. They met in Craig, Alaska, where she was fishing with her family.She was from the Bay area. After graduating from high school he went there and they were married. The funny thing is, I also met my husband in Craig, Alaska, and he was from the Roseville area.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Thursday, November 21, 2002

Grace Lucille Johnson

Grace Lucille Johnson, a former Adna and Lewis County resident, died at the age of 81 Monday, Nov. 18, at Central Peninsula Hospital, Soldotna, Alaska. She was born Grace L. Peterson Aug. 6, 1921, in Adna, where she was reared and attended schools. In 1943, she met and married Robert Johnson in Olympia. After World War II, they settled in Roseville, Calif., where she was active in Roseville Moose Lodge for many years.

In 1975, they moved to Albany, Ore. She did child care there until moving to Kenai, Alaska, in 1996 to be with her daughters.
Her husband, daughter, Virginia Borge, and son, Andrew, preceded her in death. Survivors include two daughters, Audrey Broghammer, and Debby Fahnholz, both of Kenai; a sister, Helen Flementis of Raymond; eight grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.
A closed casket visitation where the family will receive friends will be held Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. at Sticklin Funeral Chapel, Centralia, which is in charge of arrangements.
•••
A graveside service for Grace Lucille Johnson will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday in Claquato Cemetery, Chehalis.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Web posted Thursday, November 21, 2002

Grace Lucille Johnson
Obituary


Kenai resident Grace Lucille Johnson died Monday, Nov. 18, 2002, at Central Peninsula General Hospital in Soldotna of natural causes. She was 81.

There will be a closed casket visitation with the family receiving friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Sticklin Funeral Chapel in Centralia, Wash. A graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Claquato Cemetery in Chehalis, Wash.

Mrs. Johnson was born Grace L. Peterson on Aug. 6, 1921, in Adna, Wash. She met and married Robert Johnson in 1943 in Olympia, Wash. After World War II, they settled in Roseville, Calif. She was active in the Roseville Moose Lodge for many years.

In 1975, they relocated to Albany, Ore. She did child care there until her move to Kenai in 1996 to be with her daughters.

Mrs. Johnson was preceded in death by her husband, Robert L. Johnson; daughter, Virginia Borge; and son, Andrew Johnson.

She is survived by her daughters, Audrey Broghammer and Debby Fahnholz and husband, Norman; grandchildren, Darcy Wheeler, Maria Nelson, Lori Leppert, Carrie Chancellor, Mia Chancellor, Michele Fahnholz, Elissa Bradford and Andrew Fahnholz; and great-grandchildren, Brandon Wheeler, Michael Wheeler, Tony Wilson, Jacob Nelson, Stephanie Borge, Bobbi Chancellor, Jesse Chancellor and Alex Bradford.

Arrangements were made by Peninsula Memorial Chapel.


[NI0641] PETERSON, ERICK -- Born June 6, 1843, Finland. Died May 26, 1920, St. Helens Hospital, Chehalis, Wash. Cause of death: hemorrhage of bowel; duodenal ulcer. Husband of Mary. Farmer. Father: Erick Sappiney. Informant: William Peterson, Eagleton, Wash. Burial May 28, 1920, IOOF Cemetery, Chehalis, Wash.

Erick Seppanen Peterson - 1843-1920

From a copyof the Register of Marriage Statistics for the State of Washington (what they filled out when they got their marriage license). On it, Eric Peterson stated he came from the State of Ulesborg, Finland and Ida Johanna Asuja stated she came from the State of Wasa, Finland. Also he stated his father was Eric and for his mother he listed "did not know". For Ida, her mother was Sofiia Syvanjorvic
and her father was Jacob (Asuja).

Born: Oulu, Finland
Died: Chehalis, Lewis County, Washington

U. S. West White pages list 16 individuals in Western Washington with the surname of SEPPANEN. Nation wide there is 178 individuals with the surname of SEPPANEN who have published telephone numbers. In a search of the Internet, in Finland there are over 6,000 references to individuals with the surname of SEPPANEN.

Seppanen is a Finnish name, which has its origins in Central Finland. I have been told that it means "blacksmith". Erick was born in Oulu, Finland which in the 1800's was major shipping and fishing port as it is today. Did Erick come from a fishing family? At this point in time there is no way to tell, but it could explain some of the remarkable skills that he had.

From the year 1156 to 1809 what is now the Republic of Finland, was a province of Sweden. In 1809 Finland became a Duchy of Russia. It was only in 1917 that Finland became an independent Country. Which was a by-product of the Russian Revolution.

Facts about Erick Seppanen Peterson that have be provided by Leora Peterson-Hamilton and Grace Peterson-Johnson, while undocumented, give us a idea as to the personal history of our common ancestor. Both have indicated that Erick Seppanen arrived in San Francisco between the year's 1862/64. It has been told that he arrived aboard an English ship. It has been told that he "jumped ship", which, if true, would indicated that he was a member of the crew. This would also be historically correct, as during this period of time there was a major problem with ship crews "jumping ship" in all of the ports along the West Coast of the United States.

During this period of history there were ships that literally "rotted" on the beach because there were no crews to man them. It is also true that the British "shanghaied" men from all over the world to provide enough men to "man" their ships. Erick Seppanen could have been a victim of this practice. It is most likely that he joined the crew on the East Coast of the United States, probably New York. New York was the only port of entry for Swedish ships arriving in America at the time.

Furthermore, had this occurred, the British would have given him an English name as the "Laws of the Sea" prohibited ships Captain's from shanghaiing non-citizens. In other words, it was okay to "Shanghai" a British citizen, but your could not "Shanghai" a Finnish citizen. This might explain the name change.

As I have mentioned Finland was a Duchy of the Russian Empire (1809-1917) in the years 1862-64. The Swedish merchant Fleet had exclusive shipping rights from all Finnish ports at that time. Therefore, it is most likely that Erick Seppanen departed Finland aboard a Swedish ship. The problem being, what year? In 1862-64 Erick would have been 19-22 years of age. After 1865 the Swedish government required all passengers and crew to have a passport, to which records are available. Did Erick depart Finland as a passenger or a crewmember? Unknown!

During the 1840's and 1850's, in Finland, there was a series of famines. The results were large, mass immigration of the population. Family history tells that Erick was the oldest of a large family of which nothing is known. As was the custom, Erick would have gone off to seek his fortune. There are records, the problem being, what name did he use in Finland. The English spelling of Erick is different from the various Finnish spellings. Tracking his departure may be difficult.

Again as family history tells us. Erick Seppanen, now Erick Peterson, arrives in San Francisco where he settles in the Sacramento Valley. Now 22 plus years of age, he spends the next twenty or so years apparently learning the many skills he displayed once he settled on Bunker Creek some time after1885.

Family history tells that he walked from California to Washington State. Quite a feat, considering that there were no roads, no place to stop and spend the night, and plenty of hostile Indians, less than friendly white folks, and plenty of other dangers to go around. He "homesteaded" 160 arces near the town of Independence.

While Independence no longer exists, it is near the present town of Rochester. His Great grandson, William (Billy) Irvin Peterson Jr. lives in Rochester with his wife Kathy and their three sons, Tim, Trevor, and Cody.

In 1893 Erick Peterson married Ida Ajusa. Ida was 17 years old when she arrived in Washington State, probably at the Port of Olympia. As I understand, she had family members already living here. Erick apparently meets her at the port and she became his housekeeper. At the time of the marriage Erick was fifty years of age. Ida was eight months pregnant with Elmi and the "shotgun" wedding was encouraged by neighbors and probably Ida's brothers. Ida was twenty-two on her wedding day. Thus it would appear that they lived together for a period of 4-5 years before they were married.

Erick died in 1920 at the age of 77.

If you are reading this and would like to add to, correct, or make additions to this, please let me know. I have written what I have been told. I have no documentation to back any of this up and have relied on the memories of others. Help me out. I will change and update this page as I acquire new information

PETERSON, ERICK -- Born June 6, 1843, Finland. Died May 26, 1920, St. Helens Hospital, Chehalis, Wash. Cause of death:
hemorrhage of bowel; duodenal ulcer. Husband of Mary. Farmer. Father: Erick Sappiney. Informant: William Peterson, Eagleton, Wash.
Burial May 28, 1920, IOOF Cemetery, Chehalis, Wash.

[NI0642] As recorded by Debby Johnson-Fahnholz, daughter of Grace Peterson-Johnson

I read your e-mail to Mom, she said to tell you that GGrma Peterson's maiden name was Asuja, not Setula. Setula was her second husband's name. Also, she said that her maiden name was shortened to Asuja, and that there were originally three or four more letters to her name. She can't remember more. She said she was from just north of Helsinki, somewhere close to the water, cause growing up she worked cleaning fish. She was the last one of the Asuja's to come over from Finland. GrGrma had a brother named Andrew who originally worked in the mines in Montana and came to Washington sometime before GrGmpa did. Andrew and their two sisters lived in Independence. One of the sister's last name was Haqvist (sp?), she thinks her first name was Annie, and the other sister's last name was Peters, she doesn't remember her first name, but she had three children named Sofi, Peter and Iva. She said there was a write-up in the Centralia paper one time about how Iva raised her children and then went to school and became a teacher. Sofi died when she was about 21. Peter was living on the Asuja place and taking care of the place last she heard.
Annie Haqvist had two girls and two boys, Dave and Bill. They were about her dad's age. She doesn't remember the names of the girls.

[NI0643] Copied from an In Memory card:

In Memory of Elmi L. Lininger, born September 7, 1893, Chehalis, Washington. Passed Away August 16, 1971, Chehalis,Washington. Services at the Fissell Chapel of the Brown Mortuary Service. Thursday, August 19, 1971, 1:00 P.M. Rev. Arthur L. Still, Officiating.
Casket Bearers: Ronald Lininger, Bill Kinsey, Leslie Lininger, Robert Lininger, Robin Fuller, Larry K. Dean, Jack Tompkins, Jack Maki, Richard Stevens, LeRoy Lininger, Joe Slusher, Tom Wilson.
Interment: Sunset Memorial Gardens

[NI0644] As told by Gloria June Swadener-Hall: Feburary 3, 1997

Uncle Bill worked for Darigold and I believe he retired from there also. Remember him in his blue and white stripped bib overalls. When I was little I thought he worked for the railroad and just delivered milk to us.

[NI0646] Ed Peterson died in Centralia

[NI0649] Copied from a newspaper clipping:

Robert Leland Johnson

Albany, Oregon - Robert Leland Johnson, a resident of Albany since 1976, died Thursday, July 1, in Albany at the age of 62. Born April 10, 1920, in Lumas, California. Johnson was a retired stenographer clerk for the Southern Pacific Railroad. He was a U.S. Army Veteran of World War II and had been a former secretary and manager for a Moose Lodge in California.

He is survivied by his wife, Grace, at home; three daughters, Virginia Borge of Plano, Illinois, and Audrey Chancellor and Debby Fahnholz, both of Anchorage, Alaska; seven granddaughters; a brother, Carl Johnson of Roseville, California and a sister, Helen Marriott of Renton.

A graveside service will be Wednesday at 11:00 A.M. at Sunset Memorial gardens Cemetery, Chehalis with the Rev. Ken Smith assisted by the Chehalis Moose Lodge officiating. Arrangements are under the direction of Sticklin funeral chapel.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Butch, I read mom your message. I tried to type her response verbatim as much as possible, so sorry if it sounds disjointed. She just got new hearing aids yesterday and isn't used to them yet. We still have some fine tuning to do on them so it was difficult to carry on a sensible conversation.

Her response is as follows: Your dad got his warrant stripes under chemical warfare training (Note from Debby: He taught the recruits how to put on gas masks, put them through tear gas chambers, etc.) then that program was disbanded and he was put into supplies as a supply officer. He was then transferred to the 65th engineer battalion in the front lines when the war was over going towards Switzerland. When mom first met him he as a sargeant and worked his way up from there. His colonel was a friend of Eisenhower, who was trying to get
more officers trained. Dad was offered officer candidate school or get busted back to private. He chose warrant officer school instead. Dad was in England almost a year and he broke his arm in a car accident. After recovery he was transferred to France for a short time, then to Germany where his outfit was. (Note from Debby: This is when he was a supply officer. He was sent in right behind the front lines when new areas were occupied and he was supposed to set up quarters and get supplies arranged for the newly arriving occupation troops.) He was stuck in occupation for almost a year in Frankfurt and was there for a full year after the war was over.

[NI0652] CENTRAL PENINSULA MASTER GARDENER NEWS by Debby Fahnholz

The Central Peninsula Master Gardeners Winter Lecture Series started off with a bang on February 18 with Jeff Lowenfels as our guest speaker. He was introduced at the Kenai Central High School library to a crowd of over 60 people. Everyone agreed his presentation was an overwhelming success. His slide presentation and discussion was captivating to all. We greatly appreciate his willingness to find the time in his busy schedule to make the trip and discuss gardening styles in Alaska and thank him for his wonderful and lively presentation.

Central Peninsula MG's invite you to join us for our winter lecture series from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m., at the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Building, on K-Beach Road near the Bridge Access. These lectures are all presented free to the public and everyone is invited, so bring your questions and come meet your fellow gardeners! Donations gladly accepted for refreshments.

March 25 - Verna Pratt, author of numerous Alaska native plant books. See her fantastic slide show and learn about native plants.
April 22 - Rita Jo Schoultz, owner of Fritz Creek Nursery, will discuss Alaska perennials. If you want flowers that bloom year after year, her slide show is a must-see!
May 20 - Bill Campbell, from the Plant Materials Center in Palmer - Alaska's very own Potato Man! He will discuss varieties that do well here and the potato blight problem. If you grow potatoes, you won't want to miss this one!

Debby Fahnholz
email: bbtyping@alaska.net

[NI0653] Social Security Number - 537-12-276
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from a newspaper clipping:

George Flemetis

Olympia - George Flemetis, 67, a lifetime Willapa Harbor resident and longtime log truck driver, died Wednesday, December 26, 1990, at St. Peter Hospital. He was born August 28, 1923, in South Bend, (Washington). He had worked as a log truck driver for the Weyerhauser Company for 26 years.

An Army veteran of World War II, Flemetis served in the European Campaign. In 1946, he married Helen Peterson in Raymond, (Washington).

He was a former Raymond volunteer firefighter and been active for may years as a coach for the Willapa Harbor Girls Softball teams. Flemetis enjoyed fishing and woodworking.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by a daughter, Karen Hess of Puyallup; four sons, Ron, Randy, and Steve, all of Raymond and Rick of South Bend; two sisters, Ann Robinson of Seattle and Darlene Sral of Raymond; two brothers, Cal Pasman of East Wenatchee; and Jack Pappas of Federal Way; 17 grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren.

A graveside service is set for 1:00 P.M., Friday at the Menlo Cemetery. The body may be viewed until 5:30 P.M. today and from 9:00 A.M. to noon Friday at Stoller's Murphy Mortuary in Raymond.

Additional information is in the classified ad funeral notice column.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from classified section of the Raymond Herald - date unknown

Funeral notices: Raymond, Flemetis, George
graveside services will be at 1 PM Friday at the Menlo Cemetery with the reverends Mike Scheid and Norman Sorensen officiating. Viewing will be from 9 AM to 5:30 PM tonight and from 9 AM until noon on Friday Strollers Murphy's Mortuary. Military honors will be accorded by Post No. 968 Veterans of Foreign Wars.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from remembrance card.

George Flemetis born: Aug. 28, 1923, South Bend, said the County, Washington. Died: December 26, 1990, Olympia, Thurston County, Washington. Graveside services, Friday, December 28, 1990, 1 PM at the Fern Hill Cemetery Menlo, Pacific County, Washington. Officiating, the Rev. Mike Scheid, R. Saviers Lutheran Church, Raymond, City County, Washington. And, the Rev. Norman J. Sorensen, Assembly of God Church, Raymond, City County, Washington. Interment: the Fern Hill Cemetery, Menlo, City County, Washington. Strollers Murphy Mortuary, Raymond, City County, Washington.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from a Letter to the Editor appearing in the Raymond Herald some time after George's Funeral.

Letter Entitled: "False Report"

To the editor:

I am the only full siste of George Flemetis. His Obituary is lying before me and I am angered and appalled with the false information it contains. In part it states: "Full military honors were accorded by the Pacific Post #968 V.F.W." This is an absolute untruth that can be verified by hugh gathering of friends.

The "full military honors" acccorded my brother for his two years with General Patton's 3rd Army, and the five battle stars he earned consisted of the following: To my knowledge not one member of the V.F.W. was in attendance, not even the Chaplain. The pre-folded flag was presented to his widow by the mortician of all people, and mostof all, there was no farewell gun salute or taps general given in full military services for departed comrades.

No, this was not a full military service as so stated in the obituary. Rather it was a farce and a dastardly, unforgivable insult to my brother as a brave soldier and highly respected Raymond citizen. It willnot be forgotten by his family or the host of friends who fought the trecherous weather to be at his side, that bitter day, December 28, 1990. I might add: The weather was fierce at the "Battle of the Bulge", but neither George or his comrades retreated.

Signed Annabell B. Robinson

[NI0656] Name CourtCase Number Violation DateCase Type

1 Flemetis, Richard Orville
Defendant North District Court I03978533 03-24-2004 Infraction Traffic
2 Flemetis, Richard Orville
Defendant North District Court C00488444 03-23-2004 Criminal Traffic

[NI0671] White Meadow Lake History


Important Names in White Meadow Lake's History
David Beman
Tom Hoagland
Abraham Kitchel
Benjamin Kline
Colonel Thomas Muir

Table of Contents
The Name "White Meadow"
Early Political Boundaries"
White Meadow Mines
White Meadow Lake Property Owners Associatiion
White Meadow Lake (1948-1998) - Recollections

Visit the White Meadow Lake Home Page

The name "White Meadow" was first officially recorded as a name in a 1774 survey for which ownership went back to 1753. In 1774, a survey of 1500 acres covering the White Meadow Tract was returned to the Proprietors of Easter New Jersey. Since this survey bounded and listed parcels of land within it, for which ownership went back as far as 1753, the name was already given to the area by the first settlers.

According to tradition, the name "White Meadow" is said to have been suggested by the formation of a white morning mist. People of the present generation believe this is the mist they recall as hanging over a treeless meadow area extending from the present clubhouse to the business district. However, since old maps show either all swamp, or a small body of water surrounded by swamp, covering the comparatively level ground that is now the bed of the present lake, it is reasonable to assume that this area would have had a morning fog or "white meadow." But there is also another story that the name came from beds of white flowers that grew in the swamp.

As a result of hundreds of millions of years of erosion, White Meadow lay in an area rich in a black iron, magnetite. (The Indians called it Succasunna, or "black stone"). Iron ore production was the chief economic activity of settlers in the region. As late as 1937, a pamplhlet published by the Morris County Freeholders claimed that iron reserves in Norther New Jersey, mainly in Morris County, could provide all the iron needs of the nation for 350 years. Most of this store was in Rockaway Township. Artificial lakes were created throughout the Township to provide water power for the iron forges and three blast furnaces at Hibernia, Mount Hope and Spilt Rock.

Maps of 1858 and 1968 show a pond within the site of the present lake, surrounded by swamp. Older residents recall the name "Muir's Pond" (A Col. Thomas Muir moved into White Meadow about 1825 and resided there until his death in 1855). However, in the Morris County Atlas of 1887, the pond disappears and White Meadow Brook is traced from Mt. Hope through swamp land where the land exists today. It was not
until the very last part of the last century or early this century that the White Meadow Fish and Game Club built a dam at the present site and formed a "lake." And then, but not until then, the name "White Meadow Lake" came into being.

Early political boundaries show that White Meadow was first part of Eastern New Jersey. As the country developed, White Meadow became part of an enormous county known as Pequannock. When this County and others were split up, White Meadow, in 1738, became part of Morris County. In 1844, Morris County split up some of its large townships and formed Rockaway Township. White Meadow was in that township. It still it a part of Rockaway Township.

The earliest date recorded for a deed covering land in White Meadow is 1753. The man who acquired the land was David Beman. Beman later also obtained several other plots of land in White Meadow. It is quite certain that he and Thomas Miller, another landowner in the White Meadow Tract, built a forge at White Meadow,
since in 1769 a mortgage was given by John and Aaron Bigalow on one half of the forge, "which was built at a place called White Meadow."

The location of the White Meadow Forge is unknown, but it has been traced, together with White Meadow land transactions, from the Bigalows to Col. Thomas Muir, covering a period of 50 to 60 years. The absence of any mention of it after Col. Muir's time coincides with the disappearance of Muir's Pond before 1877 and the abandonment of White Meadow mines before 1873. It is obvious that when the mines were abandoned, no effort was made to keep in repair a dam for water power that was no longer needed.

By the 1770's the Bigalows owned not only the White Meadow forge but considerable other White Meadow property. Abraham Kitchel bought into this tract after 1774 but prior to or during the early years of the Revolutionary War. Abraham Kitchel was considered the first White Meadow resident, the first landowner known to have built a home there. He was one of the key men to integrate the facilities of the iron mines, forges, power mills and the budding iron works of the county to make them available for colonial purposes. It was said of Abraham Kitchel, "If Washington was the Noah of the Revolution, Abraham Kitchel was the Ark." Kitchel's iron operations in White Meadow alone were extensive enough for him to acquire the Guinea Forge, located on the White Meadow Tract at the junction of White Meadow Brook and Green Pond Road. The present Sanders Road, which is also near this junction, was known as Guinea Forge Road and ran parallel to the brook up to White Meadow until very recent times.

In 1792 Abraham Kitchel sold his house and White Meadow property to Bernard Smith. Smith sold the property to Israel Canfield in 1802.

Canfield lived in Morris Plains, but there was a school teacher in Rockaway very much interested in White Meadow, if not actually living there. This teacher, George Stickle , had married the daughter of David Beman, thereby becoming the son-in-law of the first landowner at White Meadow. He is said to have cut and ranked a cord of wood on the White Meadow Tract each day before school, taught ten hours of school and then cut another cord of wood. In this way, Israel Canfield became indebted to him for the sum of $600.00. Stickle took promissory notes for this sum and used them as first payment on the whole tract for $12,000.00, with forge, ore and charcoal in stock, on condition that all iron be sold to Canfield. The price of iron went up. By hard work and good management he soon had the tract paid for.

It was from the Stickle family that Col. Thomas Muir, who came to operate the Mt. Hope Mine shortly after 1814, purchased the White Meadow Tract, including the White Meadow and Guinea Forges. He made his residence at White Meadow sometime after 1823, occupying the house built by Abraham Kitchel.

White Meadow Mines
To understand how White Meadow was settled and exploited by the white settlers, it is necessary to know how and why this particular part of New Jersey came to be developed.

Geologically, White Meadow lies in that part of the world that is the oldest land on earth. Once as high as the alps, this ancient land has been worn down to its present height by the erosion of some 500 million years A black iron, known as magnetite, was formed in these mountains and when they weathered down to today's
dimensions, this iron was at or very near the surface. when the white man came, he found the native Americans knews this ore well. They called it Succasunna or "black stone."

Little is known about the real production of the mines in White Meadow. The Geological Surveys of New Jersey covering the Dover District, published in 1910 and in 1957, estimate the total production did not exceed 5,000 long tons. Before 1840, the mines were known as the Kitchel & Muir Mines. In 1841, Col. Muir incorporated the White Meadow Iron Company. In 1853, the mines were leased to the Boonton Iron Co. The state surveys report that the mines were actively operated between 1855 (the year Col. Muir died) and 1868. Thus, the White Meadow Mines were operated intermittently for about 100 years and have been dormant for about 100 years.

Col. Muir left an estate of about 1,700 acres to his son Peter, his daughter Ann Jane Hoagland and his son-in-law Mahlon Hoagland. Ann Jane Muir married Mahlon Hoagland in 1846. This couple lived at White Meadow until the death of Mrs. Hoagland in 1893. They had seven children. After the death of his wife, Mr. Hoagland moved to Rockaway. He leased the estate to the White Meadow Fish and Game Club, which built the dam to form the lake in its present size. Mr. Hoagland, as landlord, stocked the new lake with small mouth bass. The Club was exclusive, limited to fifty members. It included New Yorkers.

Upon the death of Mahlon Hoagland in 1907, his son Tom Hoagland purchased the shares of four other surviving children in the estate and promptly refurbished the old mansion. To the original house built by Abraham Kitchel more than a century before, with its porch facing the dam, there had been built an addition facing White Meadow Road. The house contained 14 rooms.

By 1909, Tom Hoagland had started the new Hoagland Mansion, now the White Meadow Lake Clubhouse, at the behest of his wife. The old house of Abraham Kitchel was torn down, but the addition that had been made to it was moved to where it still stands near the present nursery school building. It was used to house chauffeurs, caretakers and farmers for the estate and is now the home of the caretaker of White Meadow Temple. Tom Hoagland built the sunken gardens on the Club House lawn, near the dam, to mark the site of the old mansion, of which he was personally very fond.

Tom Hoagland lived at White Meadow until his death in 1928, after which his mansion was occupied by the family of his daughter Evelyn, who had married Chester Bayles. In 1942, the estate was sold to the Warren Foundry and Pipe Company, operators of the Mt. Hope Mine, who hoped to extend mining operations into White Meadow. When they discovered that the property would not yield sufficient high quality iron ore to make it pay, they sold it to the National House & Farms Association, Inc., owned by Benjamin Kline. The Kline family contracted to purchase the original 1,127 acres on July 6, 1945 and took title on August 28, 1945. Other acreage was added from the George W. Stickle estate and from George S. Oram and the John Spear family until they had assembled 1,500 acres.

On Labor Day weekend in 1946, when the development was officially opened for sale, Benjamin J. Kline, whose hobby was horseback riding, suffered a fall while riding on the property. He fractured his hip and was forced into semi-retirement. Though confined to a wheel chair and forced to use crutches, he remained active in guiding the development of the property until 1950. Mr. Kline, who died in 1953, lived long enough to see White Meadow Lake become an extremely popular and successful community. He was succeeded by Morton and Norman Kline.

A "lake" property was no longer unique or a novelty when White Meadow first appeared on the market. Competition was quite keen and numerous other properties were being offered to both New York and New Jersey. The Klines knew that they had to offer greatly superior facilities to attract the limited market in those days. They, therefore, invested heavily in the Club House, its furnishings and facilities, and developed expensive plans for three beaches, boat docks, beautification of the club grounds, and superior roads. Lots sold quickly because of their easy terms policy. Even though, by May 1949, over 900 lots had been sold to individual owners, only 100 homes had been built and occupied.

In June of 1949 they inaugurated the Day Camp, a surprise "extra," which had not been planned originally. The Klines subsidized its cost, including those of the two swimming pools, the playhouse, counselors, equipment, etc. from 1949 until all facilities were turned over the Country Club in 1954. The Klines believed that the Day Camp and its facilities, more than anything else in the community, were primarily responsible for the start of the large building program, which took placed during the 1950s. Later the Property Owners Association built the Athletic Field which it maintains, while the camp became a self-supporting entity under the aegis of the P.O.A.

When the White Meadow Lake Property Owners Association was formed in 1948, fewer than 25 families lived year round at the Lake. There was no bus transportation for school children. Only party line telephones were available, and as many as eight families had to share one line. Not all the sections were open nor did the Country Club then own all the common properties, title to which was still vested in National House & Farms Association, Inc. (the developers).

It was agreed that the Country Club would own these properties and that the Class B stock previously issued would be cancelled and the Class A become the sole stock, with voting rights. Even so, many lots and homes were purchased under contract so that neither property deed nor stock certificate in the Country Club would be issued until the purchase price was paid in full. As late as 1953, only one of every four property owners actually possessed a Class A stock certiicate. It would not have helped much then to have given Class A stockholders the right to vote if the only organization in which voting could be done was in the Country Club coporation.

Since it was stipulated in the deed that the Country Club could operate under the supervision of a property owners association, it was logical to form such an organization as a membership corporation. The right to vote and to hold office in the Association, or membership corporation, was not governed by ownership of stock in the Country Club. All that was necessary was evidence of the purchase of property in the White Meadow Lake development.

On the one hand, the developer held control of the Country Club corporation and reserved transfer of the common properties to it as long as he operated them at his own expense. On the other hand, a property owners association could develop in experience and in strength until a time could be set for the Association to take over and manage community property and facilities. Since the membership corporation gave every property owner voting rights, with this corporation acting as agent or governing body of the County Club corporation, all property owners would have effective control of the Country Club properties. Thus, when the Association's Executive Board began negotiation with National House and Farms Association, Inc., for an agreement on the transfer of common properties, the agreement had to be between the Developer, the Club and the Association. To strengthen its position, the Association wrote its first constitution and by-laws and ratified them on August 26, 1951.

On November 6, 1952, the "tripartite agreement" was signed by the National House and Farms Association, Inc., the White Meadow Lake and Country Club, Inc., and the White Meadow Lake Property Owners Association, Inc. This important document listed all of the common properties to be transferred to the Country Club and set the date for that transfer. It provided for the cancellation of the Class B stock and the
registration of all Class A stocks the only stock, with full voting rights, plus the limiting of the Class A stock issue to 3,500 shares. The date for the turnover was extended for two years to December 31, 1954 and standards were establsihed whereby the National House and Farms Association, Inc. would maintain the common properties for that period.

This work was adapted to html by Jeanette Cohn. October 3, 1997.

Abraham KITCHEL was born on 26 Aug 1736. He died on 11 Jan 1807. (294)(295) (296) He was buried in Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey. W. W. Munsell, "History of Morris County". "Abraham KITCHELL, son of the early settler at Whippany, lived for several years in a log house on a back road between Rockaway and Hibernia before he built a mansion at White Meadow."

Historical Records Survey Archive & Historical Sketch, Morris County. "In the 1740's too, Abraham KITCHELL, reputed to have been a man of good education, received his schooling in Hanover, where he was born in 1736."

"John Kitchel and Esther Peck..." - ""The Rockaway, N. J. Records compiled by Rev. Joseph Farrand TUTTLE give the following mention of Abraham KITCHEL: 'In April 1773, Abraham KITCHEL is mentioned as Moderator of the parish meeting, in which capacity and as Trustee, Committeeman and Collector, he frequently served the parish. His brother Aaron KITCHEL, was one of the most intelligent men in the county, taking a prominent part in the Revolution, and frequently serving the state in the Provincial and Continental Congress. Abraham was a man of better education than was common in his day among men who had not been trained in the higher schools and colleges. From the time he came into the parish until he left it in the fall of 1792 he was a leading man, whose firmness sometimes amounted to obstinacy. He was a man of some humor, great independence and physical strength. He was in the employ of Benjamin Cooper at Hibernia with his team. On one occasion happening to meet Cooper by a very bad mud hole he asked him to have it fixed. Cooper gave him a rough answer, and Kitchel seized him and threw him into the mud hole saying 'well then I will mend it with you.' Having neither poverty nor riches he was liberal according to his means, and when he removed he left his two sons, James and Ford, to assist in carrying the burden of the church, a
task which they were not loath to perform many years. He first lived in a log house near the old stone house, not standing now, but occupied many years by his son James Kitchel. In 1776 James was in the army and was brought ot Hanover sick of 'camp distemper.' His mother, Charity Ford, in nursing him caught the disease and died October 7, 1776, the very day that the Kitchel house was raised. I have been told that Abraham KITCHEL once owned the place now held by Col. S. S. Beach, which he exchanged with Francis Mc Carty for the White Meadow property. He built the Muir house and occupied it until November 1792, when he sold it to Bernard Smith. He died at Parsippany Jan. 11, 1807.'

"That Abraham KITCHEL was an active patriot during the Revolution is proven by the acceptance by the Sons of the American Revolution of G. C. McCormick, one of his descendants, to supplemental membership in that body upon the record of Abraham KITCHEL as given on page 80. The notice of such acceptance in a letter from the secretary and registrar of Colorado under date of Jan. 20, 1912, reads as follows: 'We are advised under date of January 15, 1912, that the Registrar General has approved your supplemental paper as descendant of Abraham KITCHEL and the application has been filed with your original papers under Colo. No. 419, National Number 22,569.'

"The Kitchel family of this generation was active in securing American independence. The war records of New Jersey show that many Kitchels and kindred families saw active service. The Kitchels named as soldiers are Aaron, Asa, Benjamin, Daniel, David, Isaac, James, John, Moses, Pheneas, Uzal, Mathias, and Cap't Obadiah. All were brothers, sons, or relatives of Abraham KITCHEL. See 'Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolution' by Stryker.
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Abraham Kitchel
Birth: 1679
Death: 1741

Inscription: "One of the six founding judges of Morris County in 1740"

Burial:
Whippany Burial Ground
Morris County
New Jersey, USA

Record added: Jul 9 2002
By: Richard Evers Hrazanek

[NI0673] Notes about the KITCHELL family

As published in "Whallon and Kitchell Families"
by Edward Payson Whallon, 1932

Reference to Caleb & Mercy (Parkhurst) BALL, parents of Marie Phoenice Keziah Ball

The first of the family to come to this country was Robert Kitchell, who landed at New Haven in 1639, his wife being Margaret Sheaffe, daughter of Rev. Edward Sheaffe, of Cranbrooke, Kent, England. They left England April 20, 1639, with a company of Puritan refugees, led by Rev. Henry Whitfield, in the first vessel, The Arabella, that anchored in the harbor of Quinnipiac, now New Haven, Conn.

Robert Kitchell was born in England in 1604, and died in 1672. His wife died in 1682. While on shipboard the Plantation Covenant was signed, in which the Puritans agreed to remain together, the first name to the Covenant being that of Mr. Robert Kitchell, the "Mr." designating him as a "Gentleman Commoner," or some such rank of sub-noble dignity. They soon settled at Guilford. These settlers were generally men of character, culture and substance, several of them being of University training, and Robert Kitchell held a large place among them in all trusts and dignities.

Samuel Kitchell, his son, married Grace Pierson, daughter of Rev. Abraham Pierson, pastor of the Guilford Church. Laxness of views spreading through the colony, Dr. Abraham Pierson was asked by the "Fundamentalists," as they classified themselves, to find a new home for them and their church.

He first organized a church at Southampton, Long Island, and then, going to the territory now occupied by Newark, N.J., he secured this for his people and sent word to them to come down as a Colony and Church, Samuel Kitchell, his son-in-law, being with him there from the first, as one of the founders of Newark. The Guilford Church and people became re-established at Newark, and Dr. Abraham Pierson became the first pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Newark. Robert Kitchell became known as "the benefactor of Newark."

Dr. Pierson's son, Dr. Abraham Pierson, was his assistant and successor as pastor, and became founder and first President of Yale College, his statue in bronze now standing on the campus. The daughter, Grace Pierson Kitchell, wife of Samuel, is the mother of all the American Kitchells.

The Kitchell family grew into a large and influential family in New Jersey and other states, becoming associated by marriage with many other prominent and influential families, as Tuttle, Farrand, Baldwin, Houghton, Gardner, Willis, Land, Pierson, Mulford, Sayre, Peck, Bruen, Lindsley, Howard and others.

Abraham Kitchell, son of Samuel and Grace Pierson Kitchell, was born at Newark in 1679 and died December 12, 1741. He married Sarah Bruen, who was born in 1679 and died April 20, 1745, daughter of John and Esther Laurence Bruen, and they had four sons and three daughters: Samuel, born 1704 and died November, 1732; Joseph, born 1710 and died December 24, 1789, who married Rachel Bates, who died December 24, 1789; John, born 1714, and died January 9, 1777, who married Marie Phoenice Keziah Ball, daughter of Caleb Ball and Mercy Parkhurst; David, born 1723 and died December 26, 1753, who married Ruth Tuttle, who was born 1713, and died April 4, 1780; Grace, who married Benjamin Lindsley; Mary Allis, who married Paul Leonard; Abigail, who married Edmund Crane.

Daniel Kitchell, son of John and Keziah Ball Kitchell, came to Cincinnati in 1788 and his name stands as the first of the eight charter members who organized the First Presbyterian Church of Cincinnati, in 1790. The family that descended from this Daniel Kitchell, changed the name to Kitchel, for some reason, and carry this as the family name. President H. D. Kitchel, of Middlebury College, chose this spelling, although Robert Kitchell, who signed the Plantation Covenant, certainly knew how the name should be spelled. Daniel Kitchel, early pioneer of Cincinnati had one son, Samuel, and one daughter, Phebe, who married Hezekiah Flint, and had a large family. Samuel Married Margaret Kennedy, daughter of Francis and Rebecca Kennedy. Their children were: Daniel, born in Cincinnati, in 1795, and died in Union County, Ind., in 1855; Phebe married William Goldtrap; Mary married Joshua Druce; John died in 1839; Rebecca married Andrew Davison and Julia married Elisha Walden.

From "Kitchell Family Genealogy" by Margaret Ellen Kitchell Whallon:

* (1) Robert KITCHELL and Margaret SHEAFFE, came to New Haven, CT 1639
* (2) Samuel KITCHELL and Grace PIERSON
* (3) Abraham KITCHELL and Sarah BRUEN
* (4) John KITCHELL and Keziah BALL
* (5) Daniel KITCHELL and Esther MULFORD (went to
Cincinnati, OH 1788)

Aaron Kitchel, cousin of Daniel Kitchel who came to Cincinnati in 1788, was one of the most notable members of the family. He was a U.S. Senator from New Jersey and a warm friend and counselor of General George Washington, on his staff and was one of his pallbearrrers. He is buried in the churchyard cemetery at Hanover, New Jersey. For 36 years, he was a member of the state legislator, the National Congress and the Senate, on the Commission of Forfeited Estates of Tories and on the Commission that established the Northwest Territory. He was the son of Joseph.

Mrs. Wallon, through her ancestors, Abraham Kitchell, son of Samuel, a founder of Newark, and Sarah Bruen his wife, has descended from four of the signers of the Magna Charta, one being King John himself, who was compelled to sign it and the three barons: Roger and Hugh Bigod, of the de Beauchamps family and Geoffrey de Say, ancestor of Geoffrey de Say.


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Robert Kitchell found in: Family Archive #354 Passenger and Immigration Index, 1538-1940 Place: Connecticut Year: 1639
Source publication code: 9448 Source publication page number: 43 Source name: VIRKUS, FREDERICK A., editor. Immigrant Ancestors: A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1964. 75p. Repr. 1986.
Source annotation: In the years from 1925 to 1942, Frederick A. Virkus edited seven volumes with the title, The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, published in Chicago by the Institute of American Genealogy. Each volume has a section in the main body of the work, complete in itself, entitled "Immigrant Ancestors," containing much genealogical information: vol. 1, pp. 965-997; vol. 2, pp. 387-421; vol. 3, pp. 645-692; vol. 4, pp. 727-777; vol. 5, pp. 741-793; vol. 6, pp. 749-819; vol. 7, pp. 825-895. The section in vol. 7 appears to be the most complete and it has been reprinted. Thus that 1964 reprint list is the only one appearing in no. 2048, Filby, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index. The Virkus work supplies facts on birth, ancestry, time and place of arrival on this continent, marriage, and death of each immigrant that it includes. A more complete list of immigrants to America before 1750 whose surnames begin with the letter A or the letter B through "Battles" is contained in the material listed in item no. 9450. Source: Passenger and Immigration Lists Index

Occupation - Deputy for Guilford in the General Court at New Haven. in 1650, 1656, 1661, 1662 and 1663, and Treasurer for many years.
Notes for *Robert KITCHEL Vitals61
166 Robert Kitchel left England April 26, 1639, in company with a band of Puritan refugees led by Rev. Henry Whitfield, and in the company of Eaton and Davenport.. ... They arrived in the first vessel that anchored in the harbor of Quinnipiac, now New Haven, Conn., while yet on shipboard the company bound themselves by ?? "Plantation Covenant" to "sit down and join themselves together in one certain plantation." They settled at Guilford in order to be outside the jurisdiction of the Connecticut Colony, which they suspected of serious deflection from Puritan principles.

Robert Kitchel was a leader in the community. His name stands first among signatures to the "Plantation Covenant." There is evidence that he was a man of considerable estate. The Guilford settlers were generally men of character, culture and substance.

Robert and Margaret's children are:
1) Samuel, b. England 1633, d. Newark, N. J., April 26, 1690, m. 1st Elizabeth Wakeman, of New Haven, 2d Grace Pierson, b. July 13, 1650, at Branford, Conn., dau. of Rev. Abraham Pierson, leader in the Newark settlement of 1666.
2) Joanna, m. Rev. Jeremiah Peck, son of William Peck founder of the Peck family in America and ancestor of Esther Peck Kitchel.
3) Sarah, d. Guilford, May 10, 1651.
[BJ's note: the dates of birth on the children stated in the Source noted seem spread quite far apart. For that reason I'd look for further proof of the date(s).]

"The first settlers of Guilford were most of them gentlemen of some good rank and estate in their native country. They appear to have been not only Puritans, but of the same ripe nonconformist grade with the Pilgrims of Plymouth, whom they closely resembled in all main points of faith and practice. That Whitfield was their pastor and leader, and Desborough, kinsman and trusted ally of Cromwell, their comrade, indicates very truly the spirit and aim of the movement. Their avowed purpose in coming to America was to find here an opportunity to develop their religious and political convictions in their own way. And they made it very clear, in word and deed, what their convictions and that "own way" of theirs were.

"While yet on their passage, and preparing to land at Quinnipiac, the company signed this Covenant. "We, whose names are hereunder written, intending by God's gracious permission, to plant ourselves in New England, and, if it may be in the southerly part, about Quinnipiac; We do faithfully promise, each to each,for ourselves and families, and those that belong to as, that we will, the Lord assisting us, sit down and join ourselves together in one entire plantation, and to be helpful each to the other in every common work, according to every man's ability, and as need shall require; and we promise not to desert or leave each other or the plantation, but with the consent of the rest, or the greater part of the company who have entered into this engagen ent. As for our gathering together in a church way, we do refer ourselves until such time as it shall please God to settle us in our plantation.

"In witness whereof, we subscribe our hands, the first day of June, 1639."

"Of the twenty-five signers of this covenant, the first name is that of Robert Kitchel.

"At a meeting of the planters it was "Agreed that the Civil power for the administration of justice and preservation of peace shall remain in the hands of Robert Kitchel, William Chittenden, John Bishop and William Leete, formerly chosen for that work, until some may be chosen out of the church that shall be gathered." ...

"Sept. 29, 1639, Henery Whitfield, Robert Kitchel, William Leete, William Chittenden, John Bishop and John Coffinge, as agents of the associate planters, purchased the tract which constitutes nearly all of the present town of Guilford, from Shaumpishuh, the Sachemsquaw of the Menunkatucks. The price paid was a dozen of each of the following articles: coats, shoes, stockings, mirrors, fathoms of wampum, hoes, hatchets, knives, hats, porringers, spoons, four kettles and two English coats. Dec. 17, 1641, they purchased what is called the Neck, eastward to Tuckishoag Pond. ...

219 In part, the original document read, "The nineteenth day of the fourth moneth, 1653, the ffeoffeesl in trust for purchasing the plantation resigned up their right into the hands of the church, and these foure of them, also wch were chosen to the exercise of civil power, did also expresse that their right and power for that worke was now terminated and ended, whereof notice being taken at the public meeting, it was further prpounded, agreed and concluded, that whereas, for the time past (while as yet there was no church gathered amongst us) we did choose out foure men to wit Robert Kitchel, William Chittenden, John Bishop and William Leete, into whose hands we did put full power and authority to act, order and dispatch all matters, respecting the publicke weale and civill government of this plantation, until a church was gathered amongst us, ..."

"When it became certain that the New Haven Plantations were to lose their separateness and be blended with the lax Connecticut Colony, and so all their pure beginnings be diluted and defiled, he tore away again with a like-minded company, and began his enterprise afresh in New Jersey." They settled in what is today Newark, NJ. "The settlement ranged itself along what are now Broad, Market, Mulberry and Washington streets. The town lots were, with a few reserves and exceptional grants, distributed by lot, and those of Robert and Samuel Kitchel appear on the Chart of the original town. Samuel's six acres fronted on the Lower Green or Parade Ground, which to this day blesses all beholders of the beautiful Park of Newark. Park street (formerly Smith street) opens eastward from near the middle of the Park, and runs down through what was the Samuel Kitchel lot. Robert's six acres lay S. E. of Samuel's cornering upon it. For so the lot fell to them, Feb 6, 1667, "after due preparation and solemnization"--Robert drawing No. 12, and Samuel 15."

Abraham Pierson's two-thirds stood at L429; Jasper Crane and Thomas Lyon L380 each,; and so down. Robert and Samuel Kitchel were rated together, o500. At money's worth at the time, it was a wealthy community.
--------------------------------------------------
If you wish to view the genealogy info. about Robert and his family, here's the Library of Congress info: CS71.K63 1879 Kitchel, Harvey Denison, 1812-1895. Robert Kitchel, and his descendants [microform] : from 1604 to 1879 / compiled by H.D. Kitchel. -- New York : J.P. Prall, printer, 1879. 80 p. ; 23 cm.

Call number of original: CS71.K63 1879. Master microform held by: DLC. Microfilm. Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1984. 1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm. I. Title. Microfilm 84/7119 (C) 84-207021 AACR 2

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The Family Kitchel by Virginia C. Jansen 22 February 2002 Hist314 WSU/TC
Robert, the patriarch of the Kitchel family in the United States, was baptized on 25 October 1601 to John and Joan Jordan in Beckenham, Kent, England. His father died when Robert was a few months old and his mother remarried first to Richard Lake and secondly to Rev. Edmund Sheafe.

Robert grew up as a young man in Kent in a class of yeoman who were holders of land. He was the only son and youngest child and was educated in the style of that time. As a young man he married a Jane, but no last name of his wife has emerged. The marriage to Jane occurred before 1629 when she was given as Robert's wife in a "feet of fines" and is presumed to have died before 1631; no children survived. Robert married secondly on 17 May 1632 Margaret, daughter of Richard Sheaffe and Margery Roberts, at St. Marys Brendin, Canterbury.

At this time in England, the reign of Charles I supported the High Anglican Church and to a lesser degree the Catholic Church. The government's campaign which began in 1633 was led by the Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud to eliminate England's religious dissenter

Church services were disrupted, churches dissolved and ministers deported. Many dissenters believed that salvation was no longer possible in England. And their only choice was to be delivered to homes beyond the sea.

Robert Kitchel and a company of Puritan believers set sail from England on 26 April 1639 on the vessel St. John for New England. While at sea the company drew up a covenant to rule them in the New World. The Plantation Covenant which stated they would settle in the "smoothly" part of New England about Quinnipiac and would promise to help each other, and join in making one plantation by Robert Kitchel was the first signature followed by the other 24 men in their group but none of the servants.

Traveling with Robert was his wife Margery, five year old son Samuel and probably infant daughter Joan as there has not been found a record of her birth in New England. Within two months of their arrival in Quinnipiac (now New Haven) the Puritans agreed to buy land from the Menunkatuck Indian Tribe, which lay along the border of the Long Island Sound to the eastward. The land was similar to that which they farmed in England; and, of equal importance, it was outside the jurisdiction of the Connecticut Colony.

Six of the men were selected to draw up a deed in the Plantation's name and acquire the desired land. Those elected were: Henry Whitfield, Robert Kitchel, William Leete, William Chittenden, John Bishop and John Coffinge.

They were in charge of paying the Indians in trade goods and proportionate shares were expanded for public business. The new place was named Guilford after the capital of Surrey County, where many of the company had lived in England.

On 17 December 1641, they purchased land that was called the Neck, laying eastwardly to Tuckishiag Pond. At a meeting held on 2 February 1642, it was agreed that the civil power for the administration of justice and preservation of peace should be in the hands of Robert Kitchel, William Chittenden, John Bishop and William Leete,

This administration lasted until 19 April 1643, when they resigned and turned the power over to the local church. A constitution was adopted, officers were elected, land was divided, deeds were given and Guilford became a member of the confederate New Haven Colony.

Robert Kitchel's family was small for that time; Samuel born 1633, Harman born 1634 but died before the family immigrated, Joan by about 1639 and Sarah born after they arrived in Guilford and died in 1651.

The family flourished in New England with education, freedom of religion and self government being of greatest importance. The New Haven Colony felt that with Massachusetts having established Harvard College, that they should also have their own college. Collectors were appointed to insure that each family would provide a peck a wheat or its equal vent for the establishment of their college: Yale. Robert Kitchel was appointed to collect husked corn, known as "college corn", as annual assessment for each family to support the struggling scholars.

The New Haven Colony's separate existence came to an end in 1662 When King Charles II united Connecticut River towns and New Haven Into one Connecticut Colony. Robert Kitchel and a number of his friends were outraged over the loss of control of their civil and religious affairs being given over to the new governor John Winthrop they opened negotiations with Governor Carteret of New Jersey.

The leaders of this group were Robert Kitchel and his son Samuel of Guilford, Robert Treat of Milford and Rev. Abraham Pierson of Branford. After inspection of the land along the Passaic River in New Jersey including the original site of Newark, the site was purchased for one hundred thirty pounds in New England currency, twelve Indian blankets and twelve guns. On 30 October 1665 in Bradford, the group formulated another Plantation Covenant.

Robert and Samuel Kitchel and Obadiah Bruen were among the forty-one men from Guilford, Milford and New London to sign the Agreements as was Rev. Abraham Pierson and twenty-three men from Branford. These families were to move to Newark, New Jersey in 1666.

Samuel had grown up in the Puritan Plantation, taking the oath as a Fidelity to conform himself as a freeman with full civil rights as a citizen, having civil and private rights of Guilford. Samuel married Elizabeth, daughter of John Wakeman and Elizabeth Hopkins, on 11 March 1656 in New Haven.

They made their home in New Haven where Samuel farmed. They had four children while they lived in New Haven: Sarah born 1657, died 1657/8; Elizabeth born 1659, married first Seth Thopkins and second John Bruen; Abigail born 1661, married John Ward; and Samuel Jr. about 1662 and died about 1693.

In 1662 Samuel moved his family to Guilford and became active in the plantation, serving as town agent and clerk. Born to Samuel and Elizabeth in Guilford were Mary Allis in 1663, married Josiah Ward, died in 1684 and Susanna born about 1665, married Jonathan Baldwin and died after 1709.

As result of the Royal Charter of 1662, the General Court at Hartford designated Samuel ensign of Guilford until his departure in 1667. Samuel's wife Elizabeth Wakeman died in 1665 at Guilford.

After the death of Elizabeth, Samuel married Grace, born 13 July 1650, daughter of Rev. Abraham Pierson Sr. and Abigail Mitchell, in 1666 at Guilford. (Her brother Abraham Jr. was the first president of Yale.) The family left that year to settle in Newark, New Jersey and had children Grace born 1666, Newark, married Jonathan Bell, died 1694; Bethial born about 1669, probably died young and Abraham born 1679 Newark.

The family were among the second group of settlers to land at the bay of Newark in May 1667. The bill of sale between the representatives of the Puritan group and a number of Hakinsack Indians for the tract of land was executed in July 1667. Signers representing the Puritans in this transaction were Samuel Kitchel, Obadiah Bruen, Michael Tomkins, John Browne and Robert Denison. (A copy of the deed has been found in East Jersey Records.) The settlers of Newark escaped serious Indian troubles that plagued other settlements. It has been a proud boast of New Jersey that every acre of land was purchased from the Indians.

The Newark Puritans sought only self-government and the right to a protestant doctrine, but to achieve those aims there was a constant struggle between the townspeople and the regimes of the English and Dutch who had control over the area at alternate times.

The records of the town of Newark until 1688 reflect that Samuel Kitchel was active in the affairs of the plantation. He was elected to positions of arbitrator, supervisor of working teams, town accountant, constable, grand juror, magistrate and ownsman (equivalent to current city councilman) and others.

Robert Kitchel lived until 1672 and died in Newark, having lived to see some of his dreams of a New World where man could be free, come true. In April 1682, Margaret Sheafe Kitchel died at the home of her daughter, Joannna Peck, in Greenwich, Connecticut. Samuel and Grace Pierson Kitchel both died in the year 1690 in Newark.

The eldest son, Samuel Jr., was alive in 1684 but there was no further trace of him or any of his descendants found. The family was easy to trace in the early years in the New World because there was only one male surviving that produced heirs.

Samuel Kitchel's youngest child, Abraham, was born in Newark and lived there until he was thirty-one years of age then removed to Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. In 1703, Samuel married Sarah daughter of John Bruen, at Newark.

Their children born in Newark were: Samuel born 6 January 1705, died 19 November 1732; Grace born 10 March 1708, married Daniel Lindsley and died 12 September 1777 in Morris County; and Joseph (later Judge) born 25 January 1712, married 1734 Rachel daughter of Thomas Bates and Abigail or Elizabeth (blank) in Hanover and died 22 March 1779 in Parsippany, Morris County. Children born in Morris County were: John born 2 February 1714, married three times and died 9 January 1777; Mary Allis born July 1715, married Paul Leonard and died 29 March 1762 in Parsippany; Abigail born November 1717, married first in 1734 Edmund Crane and second in 1762 Paul Leonard, the widowed husband of her sister Mary Allis, and died 20 August 1801 in Whippany; and David born 7 November 1723, married 1745 Ruth Tuttle and died 28 December 1753 in Whippany. There were 5,455 decendants of Joseph, 2,641 descendants of John and 205 descendants of David that had been found by 1991.

During the Revolutionary War, the Kitchel family were strong patriots, serving the United States with honor in militia groups. The one blot on the Kitchel family record is that Grace, daughter of Joseph Kitchel and Rachel Bates, married Samuel Ford.

Samuel Ford was the son of outstanding family in Morristown, hosts to George Washington when he spent the winter in Morristown. The son was quite a clever forger and did a good job of trying to defeat the "Yankees" with his printed money. When he was found out, he skipped to Ireland and married (without benefit of a divorce) and had 3 children. He returned again in the later days of the war and continued his currency deals and again was at the point of being caught, so retired to the wilds of Virginia. In Virginia, he married again (without divorce) and is the patriarch of many First Families of Virginia. This is also the line whose descendants include the wife of a president and the mother of the current president of the United States.

I am descended in the Kitchel line from Joseph's son Moses down to my grandmother Cora Elizabeth Kitchel, wife of Paul Augustine Carpenter.

Principal References Consulted:

Genealogical notes of Virginia and George Jansen (1999).

Kitchel Family History by Deloris Kitchel Clem and Dwain L. Kitchel

Robert Kitchel and His Descendants by Rev. Harvey Denison Kitchel

John Kitchel and Esther Peck by George C. McCormick

Lineal Ancestors of Susan Kitchel Mulford by Charles H. Cory

[NI0695] Lucy KITCHEL (photo) was born on 24 Mar 1834 in Knox, Ohio. She died on 28 Jan 1905 in Pueblo, Colo. She
was buried in Fort Collins, Colorado. She has Ancestral File number 2.(4) She has record identification number
709.(5)

She was married to Michael LAVERTY (son of Elizabeth LAVERTY) on 25 Aug 1854. Michael LAVERTY was born on
11 Jan 1824 in Park County, Indiana. He died on 11 Dec 1901 in Pueblo, Colo. He was buried in Fort Collins,
Colorado. He was a farmer and fruit grower. He has record identification number 710. (3) Lucy KITCHEL and Michael
LAVERTY had the following children:

[NI0697] Jane Booth, born 1500, married 2nd Thomas Holford, Esq. of Cheshire

[NI0719] November 13, 2002

The following obituary has been added:

Sweadner, Martha – Frederick Post, November 11, 2002. Mrs. Martha Mary Sweadner, 82, of Deerfield, Walkersville, died Saturday, Nov. 9, after a long illness, at Northampton Manor Nursing Home, Frederick. She was the wife of Duval W. Sweadner, who died in 1988. Born May 4, 1920, near Knoxville, she was a daughter of the late Edgar Cornelius Sr. and Martha Murphy Virts.

Mrs. Sweadner was a 1936 graduate of Brunswick High School. She was an active member of Libertytown United Methodist Church for 50 years. She was a Sunday school teacher, served as church treasurer, and held numerous offices in the Women's Society of Christian Service. She also served as treasurer and president of the Frederick District United Methodist Women. She was a 4-H club leader in Petersville and later Libertytown, and was a member of the 4-H All Stars.

In 1972, Mrs. Sweadner graduated from the Frederick Community College nursing program and worked at Springfield Hospital Center until her retirement in 1980. She enjoyed both the Food for Friends and Senior Citizens in Libertytown and Walkersville. After moving to Walkersville in 1991, she joined the Walkersville United Methodist Church. She became a resident of Northampton Manor in January 2001. She enjoyed cooking, needlepoint, latchhook and traveling.

Surviving are two daughters, Jeanne L. Schuyler of Andalusia, Ala., and Myra C. Eckstine and husband Bill of Murrells Inlet, S.C.; two sons, Gareth D. Sweadner and wife Marie E. and Mark W. Sweadner and wife Deanna K., all of Libertytown; five grandchildren, Kelle Rinehart, Danielle Sweadner, Jason Sweadner, Matthew Sweadner and Jonathan Sweadner; two great-grandchildren, Joshua Wright and Nicholas Rinehart; two brothers, Edgar C. Virts Jr. of Petersville, and D. Richard Virts of Brunswick; one nephew; and several cousins.

The family will receive friends from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12, at Hartzler Funeral Home, 11802 Liberty Road, Libertytown. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the funeral home, with the Rev. Marcia Mayor, her pastor, officiating. Interment will be in Fairmount Cemetery, Libertytown. The family requests memorial contributions be made to Libertytown United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 337, Libertytown, Md. 21762, or Walkersville United Methodist Church, 22 Main St., Walkersville, Md. 21793.

[NI0720] One of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Charta

[NI0726] The second son of Henry I, King of France. Through him, his Scottish line of descent can be traced by way of David I, King of Scotland, from the 81sr monarch of Ireland in 324

[NI0737] Plantagenet, Geoffrey V the Fair, Count of Anjou and Maine


Born: 24 AUG 1113
Acceded: 1129
Died: 7 SEP 1151, Château-du-Loir, France
Interred: St. Julian's Church, Le Mans, Anjou
Notes:

Burke says the marriage was 3 Apr 1127. The name Plantagenet, according to
Rapin, came from when Fulk the Great being stung from remorse for some wicked
action, in order to atone for it, went a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and was
scourged before the Holy Sepulchre with broom twigs. Earlier authorities say
it was because Geoffrey bore a branch of yellow broom (Planta-genistae) in
his helm.
Duke of Normandy 1144-1150.

Father: , Fulk V the younger of Anjou, Count of Anjou

Mother: Maine, Ermengard of
Child 1: Plantagenet, Emma
Child 2: , Mary of Shaftesbury, Abbess of Shaftesbury

Married 22 MAY 1128, Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou to , Matilda the Empress, Queen of England

Child 3: FitzEmpress, Henry II Curtmantle, King of England, b. 25 MAR 1133
Child 4: , Geoffrey VI of Anjou, Count of Nantes & Anjou, b. 1 JUN 1134
Child 5: , William, Count of Poitou, b. 1136

Associated with , Adelaide of Angers

Child 6: de Warenne, Hamelin of Anjou Plantagenet, Earl of Surrey 5, b. ABT 1129

[NI0739] Charles II, the Bald, Frankish Emperor


as Charles I, the Bald, Western Frankish King (France)

Born: 823
Died: 877

Father: Louis I, the Pious, Frankish Emperor
Mother: Judith of Bavaria

Married (1): Ermentrude
Children:
Louis II, the Stammerer, Western Frankish King
Charles, King of Aquitaine
Carloman
Judith
Married (2): Richardis
Children: ?

Western Frankish King 843-877
Frankish Emperor 875-877

Louis the Pious became Frankish Emperor in 814 with no rivals to the throne. He had three sons, Lothar,
Pepin, and Louis. In 817, Lothar was made co-Emperor with his father and King of Italy to replace Bernard,
Pepin made King of Aquitaine, and Louis made King of Bavaria. In 823, Louis had another son, Charles, this
one by a new wife (the mother of the 3 brothers had died). Louis tried desperately to work Charles in as a
successor, but the three brothers fought him everytime he tried to reform his will. After much conflict,
Emperor Louis dropped Lothar's imperial title in 829 and sent him off to Italy. The next year the brothers
attacked, reinstated Lothar with his imperial title, and had Judith, the mother of Charles, sent off to a
nunnery. By 831, Louis had regained his power, brought back his wife, and again dropped Lothar's titles, this
time all of them, and refused him to return to court ever again without permission. That year Pepin revolted.
In 832, Louis of Bavaria joined Pepin, and the Emperor Louis declaired Pepin deposed of all royal titles but he
had no power to enforce this declairation, so Pepin continued to rule. In 833, the three again attacked with
support from Louis's own generals and from Pope Gregory IV himself. They imprisoned their father and
brother, and exiled Judith to Italy under watch of Lothar, and Louis and Pepin gained territory. The next year,
however, Louis and Pepin released their father and brother, brought back his wife, and peace was made. In
835, Louis was re-crowned Emperor with great pomp. Pepin died in 838, and while Louis tried to have Charles
crowned king in Aquitaine, the nobles crowned Pepin's son Pepin II. Neither had the authority to rule in the
country. In 840, Louis the Pious died, and the three surviving brothers began a civil war for the division of the
Empire.

In 841, Charles and Louis of Bavaria ganged up on their brother Lothar, who had the support of Pepin II, who
were defeated at Fontenay, France. In 842, Charles and Louis made a formal alliegance, and together put
down a Saxon revolt that year and a revolt in Aquitaine under Pepin II. In 843, the Treaty of Verdun was
made between the three brothers, by which Charles would rule the Western Frankish Kingdom (France), with
Pepin's Aquitaine a subkindom under the ultimate authority of Charles, Lothar would rule the Middle Frankish
Kingdom (Italy, Provence, and Lorraine) with the imperial title, and Louis would rule the Eastern Frankish
Kingdom (Germany).

During his reign in France, Charles suffered the awesome attacks of the Danes, starting in 853. In 846, he
ceded Brittany to its Breton inhabitants, and due to force he had to give to them the Breton March in 851 and
Maine in 857. In 853 and 855, he was forced to allow Danish immigration into his kingdom. Another Danish
army invaded in 856-9, destroying many French cities. In 858, Charles met with King Lothar II, who controlled
the area near Denmark, to discuss a formal defense. Two years later, Louis the German invaded France on
the invite of Pepin II and the Burgundian nobles, and Charles had so little authority that he couldn't even raise
an army. The clergy finally pushed him out. In 868, Lothar died, and Louis the German and Charles the Bald
divided up Lotharingia between them, just as they had done on the death of Charles of Provence in 863.
865-6 saw more Danish invasions into France. In 866, Charles finally bribed them to leave, and the East
Frankish noble Hugh was made Duke to fight off the Norse. In 875, Emperor Louis II, died and on Christmas
Day Pope John VIII crowned Charles Emperor in Rome. Two years later, Charles died and the French throne
went to his son Louis II.

[NI0743] The period of forty-some years that Charles the Great / Charlemagne reigned as King of the Franks is considered by some as a golden age of the Frankish Kingdom. During that time the Frankish Kingdom was expanded, by conquest and acquisition, to include the Kingdom of the Saxons, Bohemia, Bavaria and Carinthia, and the Lombardy region of northern Italy. Charlemagne was an ardent supporter of the Church. He also was an advocate of education; he imported scholars from many countries to teach in the schools he established. His policies were, for the most part, fair and just, and as a result, his influence was moreso respected rather than feared.

When Charlemagne died in the year 814 A.D., the Kingdom of the Franks was once more divided into three parts among his sons. The partitions devised at that time would be confirmed by the Treaty of Verdun in 843, and would essentially remain unchanged to the present time. The western part corresponded to the region encompassed by modern-day France. The eastern part corresponded to the region that is encompassed by modern-day Germany. The region in the middle corresponded to the region encompassed by the modern-day countries of Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Switzerland and northern Italy.

From 814 onward through the Eleventh Century, the Western Roman Empire evolved out of the region that was inherited by Charlemagne's sons, Lothar and Louis. This "empire" is sometimes referred to as the Holy Roman Empire or the Roman Empire of the German Nation. As the names would imply, the ties between the Germanic realms and the Roman/Papal government had become greater than those between the Germans and the Franks in Aquitaine.

Out of the partition of the Kingdom of the Franks, following Charlemagne's death, rose the kingdoms of France and Germany. Both kingdoms underwent cultural and social changes as the concept of the feudal system became widespread. The sovereignty of Aquitaine, which was becoming known as France, had passed out of the hands of the Carolingian dynasty and into the hands of the descendants of Hugh Capet. The Capetian Dynasty of France would last into the Thirteenth Century. In the meantime, in the eastern Germanic kingdoms, the power was claimed by the descendants of the Saxon king, Henry I. Henry united the territories of the Franks, Saxons, Swabians and Bavarians in 919 and gave it the name of Regnum Teutonicorum, or the Kingdom of the Germans.

[NI0744] Pepin III, the Short, King of the Franks


Born: ?
Died: 768

Father: Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Mother: Chrotrud

Married (1): Bertrada of Laon
Children:
Carloman, King of the Franks
Charlemagne, Frankish Emperor

Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia 741-751
King of the Franks 751-768

When his father Charles Martel died in 741, Pepin III and his brother Carloman succeeded as joing Mayors of
the Palace of Austrasia. In 746, Carloman abdicated and became a monk, leaving Pepin to rule all of Austrasia
on his own. In 750, Pepin received papal permission from Pope Zachary to take the Frankish crown from King
Childeric III. In 751, Zachary formerly deposed Childeric, and Pepin became the first Caroliginian king of the
Franks. In 753, Pope Stephen went to Gaul to affirm Pepin's crown. In 755, on Stephen's wishes, Pepin
attacked the Lombards of Italy who were harrasing the Roman See, and peace was made. The next year, the
Lombard king again marauded near Rome, was again defeated, and again made peace with Pepin. That year,
Pepin promised the Church Frankish protection, thus breaking ties with the Eastern Empire that were only
needed for Italian safety. In 760, Pepin and Duke Waifar of independent Aquitaine started a war which lasted
many years. In 764, both sides were tired, and the war took a one year break. Pepin launched a final
campaign against Aquitaine in 766 with full force, Aquitaine was defeated, and Waifar and his family were
executed. By 768, the year Pepin died, Aquitaine had been completely conquered.

Pepin the Short's reign as King of the Franks came to an end in 768. His death brought the Frankish Kingdom into turmoil once more as his two sons vied for power. Charles became heir to Austrasia and part of Aquitaine; Carloman inherited Neustria and the rest of Aquitaine. Each son, though, desired to be the sole ruler. Charles got his desire three years later when Carloman died. He assumed control of his brother's kingdom, once more united the kingdom's partitioned realms into one, and took the name of Charles the Great. In 800, he would be crowned Emperor of the Romans and take the name of Charlemagne.

[NI0745] Duke of the Franks and Mayor of the Palace of the Frankish Kings. He was called "The Hammer" because he commanded the army, which saved Europe from Mohammedanism.

Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia


Born: ?
Died: 741

Father: Pepin II, of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Mother: Chalpaida

Married (1): Chrotrud
Children:
Carloman, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Pepin III, the Short, King of the Franks
Grifon
Bernard

Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia 714-741
Mayor of the Palace of Neustria 719-720
Mayor of the Palace of Burgundy 719-720

Charles Martel became Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia when his father, Pepin II, died in 714. That year he
was imprisoned by his step-mother Plectudis, but escaped later in the year to lead the Austrasian and
Neustrian nobles. The next year, the new King Chilperic II refused to act as a puppet to the nobles, and was
backed by the Aquitaine duke Eudo, who was by then semi-independent from Frankish sovergnty. In 719,
Charles defeated Eudo and took Chilperic hostage. Eudo's terms for mercy were that Chilperic would be
recognized as sole ruler of the Franks, and the Charles would control all royal offices (i.e. as Mayor). Eudo had
no other choice but to accept. In 720, Chilperic II died, Theuderic IV became king, Charles was stripped of his
positions, Eudo was able to attain full independence, and Charles was preoccupied with pushing back Saxon
invaders across the Rhine.

The next year, Eudo defeated the advancing Moslem armies and made peace with them, however in 725 they
attacked Septimania and invaded Burgundy, drawn by the wealth of the Catholic Church. In 731, the Spanish
governor Abd ar-Rahman, much loved by the Moslem people, invaded and easily overran all of Aquitaine. The
next year he took Poitiers and marched to Tours, where he was soundly beaten by Mayor Charles, and
Rahman was killed in the battle. Three years later Eudo died, and Charles took supreme control of Gaul. In
737, Provence invited back the Moslems, who were defeated by Charles and his younger brother Hildebrand,
then pushed out of Gaul forever. In 741, Charles died.

[NI0746] Chrotrud


Born: ?
Died: 724

Father: Saint Leutwinus
Mother: ?

Married (1): Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Children:
Carloman, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Pepin III, the Short, King of the Franks
Grifon
Bernard

Chrotrud was the wife of Charles Martel and mother of the king Pepin the Short. According to Frankish
tradition, she was the daughter of Saint Leutwinus, son of Gunza and one Count Warinus, himself the son of
Sigrada and Bodilan. Her mother, whose name was not known, was said to be the daughter of Doda and
Rodobertus, son of Lantbertus I.

[NI0747] Founder of the Carlovingian line of Frankish Kings.

Pepin II, of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace of
Austrasia

Born: ?
Died: 714

Father: Ansegisel
Mother: Saint Begga

Married (1): Chalpaida
Children:
Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Hildebrand
Married (2): Plectudis
Children:
Drogo, Mayor of the Palace of Burgundy
Grimoald, Mayor of the Palace of Neustria

Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia 680-714

When Pepin II became Mayor of the Austrasian Palace in 680, his only rival for power was Mayor Ebroin of the
Neustrian Palace. In 687, the Neustrian people begged Pepin to rid them of their mayor, so Pepin opened
talks with Ebroin and the boy-king Theuderic III, however battle soon occured and both Ebroin and Theuderic
were defeated at Tertry. Pepin thus inherited the Palaces of Neustria and Burgundy, where he placed his
sons. In 714, Pepin died of a fever.


Pepin of Herstal ruled the Kingdom of the Franks as the Austrasian mayor until his death in 714, at which time his son, Charles Martel took control. Charles Martel embarked on a reign of conquest of neighboring Germanic kingdoms and the confiscation of church property within the Frankish Kingdom. On his death in 741, the kingdom was divided between his three sons, Grifo, Carloman and Pepin the Short. Pepin the Short was ambitious and wanted to rule the Frankish Kingdom on his own. Grifo came to no account and was soon set aside. Carloman lost interest in competing with his brother and entered a monastery. Pepin the Short assumed power and promptly set out on a course of reconciliation with the Church. But he wanted more than just power. He wanted the royal title of King. He appealed to the Pope with the
argument that if he were to shoulder the responsibility of the rule of the kingdom, he should have the title to go with it. The reconciliatory measures Pepin the Short had enacted (which included the acknowledgement of Papal influence over the Franks) were no doubt taken into consideration by the Pope, who granted Pepin's request. Pepin the Short was crowned King of the Franks in 751. The Merovingian dynasty came to an end and the Carolingian dynasty was begun.

[NI0748] Ansegisel

Born: 602
Died: 685

Father: Saint Arnulf, Bishop of Metz
Mother: Doda

Married (1): Saint Begga
Children:
Pepin II, of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Marin, Count of Laon

Ansegisel was the son of the powerful Austrasian nobleman, Bishop Arnulf of Metz, and was married to Saint
Begga, daughter of the more powerful Austrasian nobleman Mayor Pepin I.

[NI0749] Saint Begga


Born: ?
Died: 698

Father: Pepin I, of Landen, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Mother: Itta

Married (1): Ansegisel
Children:
Pepin II, of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Marin, Count of Laon

Begga was the daugter of the powerful Austrasian nobleman Mayor Pepin I, and was married to Ansegisel, son of
the powerful Austrasian nobleman Bishop Arnulf of Metz.

[NI0750] Is said to have descended from Heli, King of the Britons, as far back as 50 B.C.

Pepin I, of Landen, Mayor of the Palace of
Austrasia


Born: ?
Died: 640

Father: ?
Mother: ?

Married (1): Itta
Children:
Grimoald, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Saint Begga
Saint Gertrude

Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia ?-640

Pepin I was a major nobleman of Austrasia, ruling it as its Mayor with the compitition of Queen Brunhild. He
played a major part in the revolution of 613, allying with King Chlotar II of Soissons. Pepin's main puppet king
was the Austrasian King Sigebert III, who was allowed to rule on his own under the protectino of Grimoald
when Pepin died in 640.


By the time that Chlotair I died, the Kingdom of the Franks had expanded, through conquest and acquisition, to include the kingdoms of the Alemanni, the Bavarians, and the Burgundians. Despite the fact that those kingdoms now were ruled by the Frankish king(s), the 'native' cultures of the people remained unique and distinct. The northeastern region was named Austrasia, and corresponded with the region that is modern-day Germany, having the Rhine and Danube Rivers as its west and south boundaries. The region that lay to the west of Austrasia, and encompassed the northern half of modern-day France, was named Neustria. The Loire River and the Rhone River served as the north and east boundaries of the region that occupied what is the southern half of modern-day France; it was given the name of Aquitania. The region that had been occupied by the Burgundian tribe remained intact and under the name of Burgundy. Of the four kingdoms, Austrasia and Neustria were still predominantly Germanic in culture; but the kingdoms of Aquitania and Burgundy, where the Germanic people had interbred more heavily with the indigenous Romans, were mostly Latin in culture.

From the year 561 to 687 the Kingdom of the Franks was embroiled in a series of civil wars. A class of noblemen had come into existence that rebelled against the authority of the Merovingian dynasty. In 614 the Peace of Paris accorded the Austrasian nobles certain rights over the king, which included the indisputable possession of their own lands. A primary result of the civil wars, therefore, was the loss of power and authority of the king; he became, in effect, simply a figurehead. The leader of the nobles, in their clash with the Merovingian ruling family, was a man from Landen by the name of Pepin. In order to assure that the newly won rights of the nobles were protected, Pepin assumed a position within the royal court as "mayor of the palace". It was the mayor of the palace in whom the real power now came to be vested. The Frankish Kingdom was ruled by successive mayors of the palace, or the Sluggard Kings, as they were known. Following Pepin's death in 639, the office of mayor of the palace went to his son-in-law, Anselgesil, and upon his death it was passed on to his son, Grimwald, who declared his own son to be the rightful king of the Franks. The fact that Anselgesil had established his own hereditary succession for the office of the mayor of the palace, which was no different than the Merovingian dynasty, angered the nobles. The nobles chose Pepin of Herstal, a grandson of the first Pepin, as their leader. They rose up in armed rebellion against Grimwald and murdered him and his son. They also defeated the Neustrian nobles at the Battle of Testry in 687.

[NI0751] Saint Arnulf, Bishop of Metz


Born: 582
Died: 641

Father: Bodigisel II
Mother: Oda de Savoy

Married (1): Doda
Children:
Ansegisel

Bishop of Metz ?-641

Arnulf was a powerful Austrasian noble during the time of Mayor Pepin I, and their two children Ansegisel and
Begga were married. According to Frankish myth, Arnulf was the son of Bodigisel, a supposed son of Saint
Gendolphus, Bishop of Tongress, and Oda de Savoy. This bishop was an actual historical figure, the son of
Arthemia and Munderic of Vitry. According again to the myths, Munderic was the son of Cloderic the Paricide,
son of the historic Sigisbert the Lame. This Sigisbert was the son of King Childebert of Cologne, another
historical figure that died sometime shortly after 450. He was the suposed son of one Clovis the Riparian who
died after 420.

Died 640. Arnulf was a courtier of the Austrasian King Theodebert II, a valiant warrior, and a valued adviser. He married the noble Doda (the marriage of his son Ansegisel to Begga, daughter of Blessed Pepin of Landen, produced the Carolingian line of kings of France).

Arnulf desired to become a monk at Lérins. However, when his wife took the veil and Arnulf was at the point of entering Lérins, he was appointed bishop of Metz about 610. He played a prominent role in affairs of state, was one of those instrumental in making Clotaire of Neustria king of Austrasia, and was chief counselor to Dagobert, son of King Clotaire, when the king appointed him king of Austrasia.

About 626, Arnulf resigned his see and retired to a hermitage near the abbey of Remiremont (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

In art, Saint Arnulf is portrayed as a bishop with a coat of mail under his cope. He may also be shown (1) with a fish having a ring in its mouth; (2) blessing a burning castle; or (3) washing the feet of the poor (Roeder). He is venerated at Remiremont. Like Saint Antony, Arnulf is invoked to find lost articles. He is also the patron saint of music, millers, and brewers (Roeder).

Arnulf of Metz, Saint

Bishop (c.580-640), statesman, born Laye-Saint-Christophe (now France); died Remiremont. A chief minister of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia, he married, and had two sons. Later he became Bishop of Metz and an example of virtue and wisdom. After being chief adviser of the young King Dagobert, he resigned all his offices and ended his life in monastic solitude. One of his sons was the father of Pepin of Heristal, the founder of the Carlovingians. Patron of Metz, and of brewers and millers; invoked as finder of things lost. He is represented wearing armor under his cope; extinguishing a fire by his blessing; and finding his episcopal ring inside a fish. Relics at Metz. Feast, at Metz, 19 August.

New Catholic Dictionary - Catholic Encyclopedia; Butler

Arnold of Metz 513

* Born: 582
* Died: 16 Aug 641

Another name for Arnold was St. Arnulf of Metz.

General Notes:

Statesman, bishop under the Merovingians. His parents belonged to a distinguished Frankish family, and lived in Austrasia, the eastern section of the kingdom founded by Clovis. In the school in which he was placed during his boyhood he excelled through his talent and his good behaviour. According to the custom of the age, he was sent in due time to the court of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia (595-612), to be initiated in the various branches of the government. Under the guidance of Gundulf, the Mayor of the Palace, he soon became so proficient that he was placed on the regular list of royal officers, and among the first of the kings ministers. He distinguished himself both as a military commander and in the civil administration; at one time he had under his care six distinct provinces. In due course Arnulf was married to a Frankish woman of noble lineage, by whom he had two sons, Anseghisel and Clodulf. While Arnulf was enjoying worldly emoluments and honours he did not forget higher and spiritual things. His thoughts dwelled often on monasteries, and with his friend Romaricus, likewise an officer of the court, he planned to make a pilgrimage to the Abbey of Lérins, evidently for the purpose of devoting his life to God. But in the meantime the Episcopal See of Metz became vacant. Arnulf was universally designated as a worthy candidate for the office, and he was consecrated bishop of that see about 611. In his new position he set the example of a virtuous life to his subjects, and attended to matters of ecclesiastical government. In 625 he took part in a council held by the Frankish bishops at Reims. With all this Arnulf retained his station at the court of the king, and took a prominent part in the national life of his people. In 613, after the death of Theodebert, he, with Pepin of Landen and other nobles, called to Austrasia Clothaire II, King of Neustria. When, in 625, the realm of Austrasia was entrusted to the kings son Dagobert, Arnulf became not only the tutor, but also the chief minister, of the young king. At the time of the estrangement between the two kings, and 625, Arnulf with other bishops and nobles tried to effect a reconciliation. But Arnulf dreaded the responsibilities of the episcopal office and grew weary of court life. About the year 626 he obtained the appointment of a successor to the Episcopal See of Metz; he himself and his friend Romaricus withdrew to a solitary place in the mountains of the Vosges. There he lived in communion with God until his death. His remains, interred by Romaricus, were transferred about a year afterwards, by Bishop Goeric, to the basilica of the Holy Apostles in Metz.

Of the two sons of Arnulf, Clodulf became his third successor in the See of Metz. Anseghisel remained in the service of the State; from his union with Begga, a daughter of Pepin of Landen, was born Pepin of Heristal, the founder of the Carlovingian dynasty. In this manner Arnulf was the ancestor of the mighty rulers of that house. The life or Arnulf exhibits to a certain extent the episcopal office and career in the Merovingian State. The bishops were much considered at court; their advice was listened to; they took part in the dispensation of justice by the courts; they had a voice in the appointment of royal officers; they were often used as the king's ambassadors, and held high administrative positions. For the people under their care, they were the protectors of their rights, their spokesmen before the king and the link uniting royalty with its subjects. The opportunities for good were thus unlimited; and Arnulf used them to good advantage.

Arnulf was a powerful Austrasian noble during the time of Mayor Pepin I, and their two children Ansegisel and Begga were married. According to Frankish myth, Arnulf was the son of Bodigisel, a supposed son of Saint Gendolphus, Bishop of Tongress, and Oda de Savoy. This bishop was an actual historical figure, the son of Arthemia and Munderic of Vitry. According again to the myths, Munderic was the son of Cloderic the Paricide, son of the historic Sigisbert the Lame. This Sigisbert was the son of King Childebert of Cologne, another historical figure that died sometime shortly after 450. He was the supposed son of one Clovis the Riparian who died after 420.

[NI0756] Daughter of the Count of Guelph-Ottdorf (Ancestor of the Royal House of Great Britian.

[NI0782] Ruled from 1087 to 1100

[NI0783] NOTES: Declared heiress-presumptive in 1126, disputed the throne with Stephen. She was possibly a twin
with William (Duke of Normandy). Had three sons, of whom the eldest later became King Henry II.

Matilda the Empress, Queen of England


Born: ABT 1103/04, Winchester, England
Acceded: APR 1141
Died: 10 SEP 1167, Abbey of Notre Dame des Prés, Rouen
Interred: Rouen Cathedral, Rouen, France
Notes:

She was designated Henry's heir, and on his death (1135), Stephen siezed the
throne and Matilda invaded England (1139) inuagurating a period of
inconclusive civil war. She and he second husband (Geoffrey) captured normandy
and in 1152 the Treaty of Wallingford recognised Henry as Stephen's heir.
Burke says she was betrothed in her eight year (1119) to Henry.

Father: , Henry I Beauclerc, King of England, b. ABT SEP 1068

Mother: , Matilda (Edith) of Scotland, b. 1079/80

Married 7 JAN 1114, Mainz, Germany to , Henry V of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor

Married 22 MAY 1128, Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou to Plantagenet, Geoffrey V the Fair, Count of Anjou and
Maine

Child 1: FitzEmpress, Henry II Curtmantle, King of England, b. 25 MAR 1133
Child 2: , Geoffrey VI of Anjou, Count of Nantes & Anjou, b. 1 JUN 1134
Child 3: , William, Count of Poitou, b. 1136

[NI0787] Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess of Aquitaine


Born: ABT 1122, Chateau de Belin, Guinne, France
Acceded: 19 DEC 1154, Westminster Abbey, London, England
Died: 1 APR 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, Maine-et-Loire, France
Interred: Fontevraud Abbey, Maine-et-Loire, France
Notes:

Other sources say she died 26 Jun 1202 and she was born Chateau de Belin.
Burke thinks she died 1162.
Countess of Saintonge, Angoumois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux, Agen.

Father: , William X the Toulousan of Aquitaine, Duke of Aquitaine, b. 1099

Mother: de Rochefoucauld, Eleanor Châtellérault, b. 1103

Married 22 JUL 1137, Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, France ANNULMENT 1152 to Capet, Louis VII the
Younger of France, King of France

Child 1: Capet, Mary of France, b. 1145
Child 2: Capet, Alisa, b. 1150

Married 18 MAY 1152, Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, France to FitzEmpress, Henry II Curtmantle, King of
England

Child 3: , William, Count of Poitiers, b. 17 AUG 1152
Child 4: , Henry the Young King, King of England, b. 28 FEB 1155
Child 5: , Matilda (Maud), b. JUN 1156
Child 6: , Richard I Coeur de Lion, King of England, b. 8 SEP 1157
Child 7: Plantagenet, Geoffrey II of Bretagne, Duke of Brittany, b. 23 SEP 1158
Child 8: Plantagenet, Eleanor, b. 13 OCT 1162
Child 9: Plantagenet, Joan, b. OCT 1165
Child 10: , John I Lackland, King of England, b. 24 DEC 1167

[NI0788] Richard I Coeur de Lion, King of England



Born: 8 SEP 1157, Beaumont Palace,Oxford,England
Acceded: 3 SEP 1189, Westminster Abbey, London, England
Died: 6 APR 1199, Chalus,Limousin,France
Interred: Fontevraud Abbey, France
Notes:

Reigned 1189-1199. Prisoner in Germany 1192-1194.
A hero of Medieval legends spent all but 6 months of his reign abroad. He
became Duke of Aquitaine in 1168 and of Poitiers in 1172. He joined the 3rd
crusade in 1189 and conquered Messina and Cyprus before arriving in the Holy
Land. His victory at Arsuf gained Joppa (1191). On his way home he was capture
in Austria and was only released by Emporer Henry VI after payment of an
enourmous ransom (1194).He returned briefly to England but died in France.

Father: FitzEmpress, Henry II Curtmantle, King of England, b. 25 MAR 1133

Mother: , Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess of Aquitaine, b. ABT 1122

Married 12 MAY 1191, Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus to , Berengaria of Navarre

Child 1: , Philip of Cognac, Lord of Cognac

Associated with St Pol, Joan de

Child 2: , Fulk

For further information see also these other records

swedish2289

[NI0789] NOTES: John was a Plantagenet king of the House of Anjou; Reign: 1199-1216; Best known for signing the
Magna Charta. John's reign had become increasingly tyrannical. To support his wars he had extorted money,
raised taxes and confiscated properties. His barons finally united to force his to respect their rights and
privileges. John had little choice but to sign the Magna Charta presented to him by his barons at Runnymede
in 1215. This made him subject rather than superior to the law. Shortly afterward John and the barons were
at war.

John I Lackland, King of England


Born: 24 DEC 1167, Beaumont Palace,Oxford,England
Acceded: 27 MAY 1199, Westminster Abbey, London, England
Died: 19 OCT 1216, Newark Castle, Newark, Nottinghamshire
Interred: Worcester Cathedral
Notes:

Reigned 1199-1216. Signed Magna Carta in 1215 at Runnymede.
His reign saw renewal of war with Phillip II Augustus of France to whom he has
lost several continental possesions including Normandy by 1205. He came into
conflict with his Barons and was forced to Sign the Magna Carta. His later
repudiation of the charter led to the first barons war 1215-17 during which
John died. Burke says he was born in 1160.
King of Ireland 1177, Count of Mortain 1189, Earl of Gloucester.

Father: FitzEmpress, Henry II Curtmantle, King of England, b. 25 MAR 1133

Mother: , Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess of Aquitaine, b. ABT 1122

Married 29 AUG 1189, Marlborough Castle, Wiltshire Divorce 1199 to de Clare, Isabella, of Gloucester,
Countess of Gloucester

Married 24 AUG 1200, Bordeaux to Taillefer, Isabella of Angoulême, Queen of England

Child 1: , Henry III, King of England, b. 1 OCT 1207
Child 2: , Richard of Cornwall, Earl of Cornwall, b. 5 JAN 1209
Child 3: , Joan, b. 22 JUL 1210
Child 4: , Isabella (Elizabeth), Empress of Germany, b. 1214
Child 5: , Eleanor, b. 1215

Associated with Ferrers, Agatha

Child 6: , Joan of England

Associated with de Warenne, Suzanne

Child 7: FitzJohn, Richard of Dover, Baron of Chilham

Associated with de Tracy, Hawise

Child 8: , Oliver
Child 9: Gifford, Osbert
Child 10: FitzRoy, Geoffrey
Child 11: Courcy, John FitzJohn, Knight or Clerk o lincoln
Child 12: FitzRoy, Odo (Eudo)
Child 13: , Ivo
Child 14: , Henry
Child 15: , Richard, Constable Wallingford Csl
Child 16: , Matilda, Abbess of Barking
Child 17: Blanche, Isabella la

For further information see also these other records

presidents0648

[NI0820] THIRTEENTH GENERATION



7324. John Bruen (172)(336) (420) was born about 1560 in Bruen, Stapleford, Cheshire. He died on Jan 18
1625/26 in Bruen, Stapleford, Cheshire. John Bruen was, perhaps, the most celebrated Puritan layman of his
day. Ormerod, in his History of Cheshire, wrote that "He was second son and by survival the heir and oldest of
a family of fifteen [actually seventeen] children, one of the few persons in history whose virtues alone, in the
rank of a country gentleman, have handed down his memory." And it is clear that he had a magnetic affect on
all who met him. The Archbishop of Ireland, although by definition a member of the Church of England, wrote
that "In him was the very beauty of holiness and he was of so ample and cheerful a countenance that when I
beheld him I was reminded of Moses, whose very face shone as in honoring more than ordinary eminency of
grace in his heart."

John Bruen was descended from an old Cheshire family long settled at Bruen Stapleford (it is unknown if his
family gave its name to the town or the other way around). In his youth he often stayed with his uncle in
Dutton, Cheshire, whose family by charter had control of the minstrels of the county and John Bruen became
an expert dancer, a skill he would later disparage. "At that time," he was to write, "the holy Sabbaths of the
Lord were wholly spent, in all places about us, in May-games and May-poles, pipings and dancings, for it was
a rare thing to hear of a preacher, or to have one sermon in a year."

He attended Oxford at St. Alban's Hall for two years, but did not take a degree. At this time he also enjoyed
the hunt and he and another relative, Ralph Done, kept "fourteen couples of large-mouthed dogs." But when
he inherited his father's estate, he sold off his pack and disparked the property.

He brought up his children very strictly and made sure that his servants were pious and sober. One, Robert
Pashfield, although illiterate, was such a keen student of the Bible that he was able to give the book and
chapter for nearly every sentence in it. Bruen always rose early and read prayers twice a day and prayed
himself seven times a day. He removed the stain-glass windows of the local church and defaced the sculpture
therein. On Sundays, he would lead his servants and children to the church, about a mile distant, and would
stop at the houses of his tenants on the way, arriving at church with a throng behind him. He would stay after
morning prayers, missing dinner and continuing until after evening prayers.

Bruen maintained open house for like-minded people, and "gentlemen of rank became desirous of sojourning
under his roof for their better information in the way of God, and a more effectual reclaiming of themselves
and their families." Perkins, the Puritan divine, called Bruen's house, "for the practice and power of religion,
the very topsail of all England."

After his first wife died, he lived for a while with his second wife's family, but when he returned to Bruen
Stapleford, his house again became a place much visited by people of quality looking for enlightenment. After
the death of his second wife, he broke up his household and removed to Chester, until he returned, once
again, to Stapleford with his third wife.

John Bruen, while intensely pious, was also very hospitable and charitable. Towards the end of his life,
according to the Dictionary of National Biography, "his prayers were twice accompanied by 'ravishing sights.'"
Among the Harlein manuscripts is a compilation by John Bruen entitled "A godly profitable collection of divers
sentences out of Holy Scripture, and variety of matters out of several divine authors." Numbering fifty-two,
these are commonly known as "John Bruen's cards."

At his death, the parish register recorded under burials "25th January 1625 [1626 N.S.]: John Bruen of
Stapleford, Esquyer, Nulle pietate secundis.

An Israelite in whom no guyle
Of Fraud was ever found;
A phoenix rare whose virtues fair
Through all our coasts do sound."

He was the subject of a biography, first printed in 1641, under the title of "The very Singular Life of John
Bruen, Esq., of Bruen Stapleford, Cheshire, exhibiting a variety of memorable and Exemplary Circumstances,
which may be of Great Utility to all Persons, but Principally Intended as a Precedent of Piety and Charity for
the Inhabitants of the County of Chester." It was written by "the Reverend William Hinde, Fellow of Queen's
College, Oxford, and preacher of God's Word at Bunberry, in the aforesaid County." It was reprinted in 1799 in
Chester and in New York in 1857. He was married to Anne Fox in 1597 in Tarvin, England.

[NI0821] Notes

Ref#83:
Obadiah BRUEN. Died AFT 1680, Newark, NJ. Son of John B. BRUEN and Anne
FOX. Married Sarah, died ABT 25 MAR 1684. From "A Genealogical
Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England" by James Savage
(Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1969: at Nichols Library,
Naperville, IL) Vol 1, page 280 (Bruen): OBADIAH, Gloucester, came, 164
prob. with Rev. Richard Blinman, had first set down at Marshfield, and
ask. for adm. as freem. of Plymouth jurisdict. Mar. 1641, but speedily
went to the opposite side of the Bay. He was freem. 19 May 1642;
selectman in 1642, and sev. foll. yrs. and rep. 1647, 8, 9, and 51, in
wh. last yr. with his spiritual guide he rem. again to New London, there
was town clk. 15 yrs. often rep. and is nam. in the royal chart. 1662;
but hav. purch. 11 June 1667, with assoc. the ld. in N.J. now the city
of Newark, he rem. thither, where the fam. has always flour. He was
youngest s. of John B. Esq. of Bruen Stapleford, Cheshire, bapt. 25 Dec
1606, at Tarves, nearChester, bec. a draper at Shrewsbury in the adjoin.
Co. Salop, had w. Sarah and ch. Mary, bef. com. over, and here Rebecca;
Hannah, b. 9 Jan. 1644; and John, 2 June 1646. The time of his d. in
unkn. but he was alive 1680. In spel. the name a slight variety occur
let. of 11 Oct. 1679 to his d. and her h. at New london, from Newark, to
tell of the d. of their min. the first Pierson, is sign. Ob. Brewen, but
by the w. Sarah Bruen. His d. Mary m. 1653, John Baldwin of Milford, as
his sec. w.; Hannah m. 1663, John Baldwin of Milford, s. of the h. of h
sis. but perhaps d. soon, as he is said to have d. on a voyage unm. but
it may be that her h. was ano. of the frequent Johns; Rebecca m. 1663,
Thomas Post of Norwich, as his sec. w. Rev. Matthias, b. at Newark, 11
Apr. 1793, Columb. Coll. 1812, d. 11 Nov. 1829, was a descend. of high
reput. "Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants"
Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich Vol 1 p 127: Obadiah Bruen,
bapt at Tarvin, England, Dec. 25, 1606; d. at Newark, N.J., about
1682/90; m. Sarah, d. about Mar. 25, 1684

Children of Obadiah BRUEN and Sarah:
1 Mary BRUEN. Married John BALDWIN, son of Sylvester BALDWIN.
2 Hannah BRUEN. Born 9 JAN 1643, Gloucester,MA. Died ABT 1695,
Newark,,NJ. "Pedigrees--" by Redlich (see notes for John Bruen) p
122: Hannah Bruen, b. at Gloucester, Mass., Jan. 9, 1643; d. at Newark,
about 1695; m. at New London, Oct. 3, 1663, John Baldwin, b. at Milford
Conn., about 1640; d. at Newark, about 1703
3 John BRUEN. Born 2 JUN 1646. Died ABT 1696, Newark,,NJ.
"Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants" by
Marcellus Donald Alexander R. von Redlich, Genealogical Publishing Co.,
Inc., Baltimore 1988 Vol. 1, p 127: John Bruen IV, b. June 2, 164
newark, N.J., about 1696; m. Esther, dau. of Richard Lawrence


Obadiah BRUEN, 14 b. Dec. 25, 1606; m. Sarah _____; emigrated to New
England. He was Representative in Massachusetts; after that, for fifteen
years, Town Clerk of New London, Conn; one of the grantees in the Royal
Charter of Connecticut. He was one of the associates in buying Newark a
settled there. He had ch.:

1. Mary. (?) May be a mistake of Mr. Savage for Mary, the sister, who m.
John Baldwin, Sen [Others think this is a mistake too]
2. Rebecca, 15 m. Thomas Post
3. Hannah, 15 b. Jan. 9, 1644; m. [13 Oct 1653] John BALDWIN, s. John,
Sen. of Milford (ante page 300.) [CC Baldwin Gen]
4. John, 15 b. June 2, 1646

[CCB concludes by quoting Tuttle to the effect that (naturally) the
Bruen's are descended from the usual collection of famous royals- Willi
the Conqueror; ancient kings of Scotland; Saxon kings of England; Alfred
the Great; Hugh Capet; Robert, King of France; Charlemagne and
Constantine. Anybody have the sources on all that? (Bev asked
ingenuously!) Oh yes, I left out Pepin, the Old; b abt A.D. 560; King
John and four or five Barons who signed the Magna Carta. This last if
from "At the Sign of the Crest" by Hazel Kraft Eilers in Hobbies, The
Magazine for Collectors, Sept. 1952, p. 156. The references she gives f
Pepin and company are "The Encyclopedia of American Biography" and "The
Ancestry of John Barber White", neither of which I have looked at.
Meanwhile, back in the colonies, the Bruens were continuing to create
descendants. Eilers adds a few
details (e.g. Plymouth) but seems to have relied upon CCB's account from
Tuttle:]

Obadiah BRUEN, 14 b. Dec. 25, 1606; m. Sarah _____; landed at Plymouth,
Mass., 1640-1. He first settled at Marchfield, Mass. He was admitted
"freeman, 1642, selectman 1642 and for several years following. He was
Representative in Massachusetts; after that, for fifteen years, Town
Clerk of New London, Conn; one of the grantees in the Royal Charter of
Connecticut. He was one of the associates in buying Newark and settled
there. He had ch.:

1. John,15 b. June 2, 1646 m. Esther Lawrence, dau. of Deacon Richard
Lawrence of New Haven, CT
2. Rebecca,15 m. Thomas Post of Norwich
3. Hannah,15 b. Jan. 9, 1644; m. [13 Oct 1653] John BALDWIN, Jr. of
Milford [Beware of the confusions over John Baldwin Senior, Junior, John
I, John II etc. It is argued- persuasively by some- that the John Baldw
Jr. of Newark was not the son of John Baldwin Senior of Milford although
it is agreed that John Baldwin Senior of Milford did have a son named
John Baldwin.

Everton Publishers, Root Cellar Search: Submitter #: 16852
Name:
SHARON K LEON,
N 5308 OAK
SPOKANE, WA 99208

[NI0824] Lone Hill Cemetery
Lewis County, Washington

Lone Hill Cemetery, aka Layton Prairie Cemetery; near Toledo, overlooking
the Cowlitz River on Eadon Road. Lewis County Cemetery District #5
Toledo WA. NW 1/4 of Sec 11 T11N R1W, Established in 1889. 1st recorded
burial 1850.

Zard, Gifford 1918 with Maxine Zard
Zard, Maxine 1920 with Gifford Zard

[NI0827] Lee Daniel Wisner 1885 - 1912

Lee Daniel Wisner was born in Howard. Kansas in 1885 to Daniel D. and Mary Wisner, the youngest of 4 living children. He came with his family to Washington Territory in the spring of 1888.

The 1890 census in Chehalis lists Lee as in school.

A 1907 Chehalis census states Lee was living with his father Dan and his profession was a teamster. His 1912 death certificate lists him as a rancher.

After his marriage in April of 1909 to May Kitchell, they lived in a house in Chehalis at 1726 Chehalis Ave, (current address would be 678 Chehalis Ave). Leroy has a picture of the house with May standing on the front porch, and an inscription on the back noting "my first house with the address and date of 1909".

Not much is known about Lee, as he died when Elwin was less than 4 months old.

On August 16, 1910 Lee purchased property from R. A. Carbone. It was 6.4 acres of land at the intersections if Deep & Bunker Creeks. In 1988 a neighbors son at Bunker, John Sidhorski told Leroy, that the original house on this property was located at about the location of the east end Bunker Creek bridge.

It was an old mill office, which later burned down. When Lee and May bought the property, they lived in a house that was on the west side of Ceres Hill road about 150 feet downstream on Deep creek, (just north of what later was Charlie’s garage) from the Bunker Creek road intersection. This house burned down 6 years after the one by the barn.

There was a footbridge from the house across Deep creek to the barn, and another one across Bunker Creek to the field and orchard. Family members Amiee Furhmeister, Leora Hamilton and Layton Brown told the location of these bridges.

Elwin and family in later years would pick apples in this orchard. Elwin's favorites were the "Wolf River” and the "King". Leroy remembers remnants of a building in the orchard, that Layton said was a chicken house.

The barn was on the small triangle of land between the two creeks. Leroy can remember an old barn overgrown with evergreen briers in about 1945. As he once went into it thru the berries. Layton says that there was a house here also at about the location of the current road, as the original road made a loop northward between the two bridges. This house burned down.

His father Daniel D. Wisner later lived across and just upstream of the Bunker creek bridge in what was known as the McConikie/Morrow place. Lee's brother Oscar Wisner lived on the same property as Dan, only up Bunker Creek a little almost to the first corner, or about 300 ft. West of Dan.

There are pictures of Lee with his son Marvin on a low horse drawn sled, and another of Lee with a skinned out cougar over his shoulders with him holding the head in his left hand and a Winchester lever action rifle in the other, standing in about 6" of snow in an area that has a few houses and logged land in the background. The caption on the picture by his wife says "he cometh home". The rifle appears to be either a model 94 or 55 takedown, half magazine.

Leroy has post cards sent from Severy, Kansas from Glenn Knapp to Lee dated 1909 to 1912; twice these say Glenn is in school. Glenn is a cousin on Lee's mothers side of the family and about 14 years younger than Lee. Another card appears to be from Glenn’s mother and is signed Zora.

We also have post cards from Lee to his wife from Tacoma dated Aug 10, 1911. He was a juror on apparently a federal trial. One-card states where he is staying and who he is rooming with, another dated Aug 13, 1911 states he had $15.90 coming. Another card dated September 23 states " I would be well pleased if I could be at home. But the attorney told us today we had got a life sentence so good-bye. L."

There is as of yet no official records, but more than one family member has said that he was a constable. Leroy checked in a book of law enforcement people of Lewis County back into the late 1800's and his name does not appear.

He checked with the US Marshals historian in Washington DC, and Lee was not a marshal, as marshals are appointed by the President of US and are well documented. Leroy was told that it is possible he could have been a deputy marshal, appointed by the US Marshal in the area, and papers will have to be sent for inquiry to Washington D.C. for documentation of that.

However two known photos show him wearing a law enforcement badge. One thought is that he may have been deputy US Marshall working in and around the logging areas of Bunker, Adna and Littell. As those days he could not have traveled into Chehalis each day and back.

Stories also passed on say he died from complications of results of a escaped convict he was chasing, released the brake of a rail car Lee was crawling under during the chase, allowing the car to roll over Lee, crushing his lower body. This was supposed to have happened on the rail siding that went to the sawmill at Littell.

Dan E. Wisner remembers this, as told to him by Elwin. Dan now has the coin purse that Lee was supposed to be carrying at the time, which flattened 2 of the coins he had in it.

The above story was asked of Layton Brown, who was the son of Lee's surviving widow by a later marriage. Layton said that he had never heard this version.

Although Rea said, his mother’s father did die from a train cutting his legs off, while he and two other men were riding a speeder in the Onalaska area. The other men jumped to safety, but Francis Kitchell did not make it, so maybe the two stories got mixed up over the years?

May said she could hear him scream from a family members house on 6th street a couple blocks from the hospital. Another slant on this is that while he was in the hospital and in much pain, the doctor was supposed to have placed a suicide pill on the table, if the pain got unbearable.

The death certificate from the State of Washington is hard to read the doctors complete writing, but it appears to be complications of appendicitis. The doctor’s notes are, that contributory circumstances were spread over two years and at the time of death he was under the doctors care for 5 days. More than likely then, the actual cause of death was probably peritonitis, (gang green) caused by burst appendices.

Leroy and Marlene interviewed Rea Kitchell (Mays sister-in-law) on July 18, 1997 when she was living with her daughter Maxine Zard in Onalaska. Rea at that time was 99 years old and had short-term memory loss but her long-term memory had not gotten that bad.

She told that she remembers others saying later when she married into the family that Lee died from a lingering illness that was associated to some sort of chest problems, pneumonia, TB, lung cancer?

Rea also said that Lee was not well liked, as he was mean. Could this be due to a lingering illness and/or possible law enforcement duties?

One obituary notice states. "Lee died following an operation. The services were held at the Baptist church. Rev. E. E. Duley, a former pastor, at his request preached the funeral sermon. Rev. Duley was assisted by Rev. W. C. Driver, present pastor of the church and the Rev. A. H. Chittenden of the Presbyterian Church.

The remains were followed to the Urquart cemetery by a host of friends and relatives where internment was made by the AOUW lodge of which Lee was an honored and beloved member."

Another obituary, from the Chehalis Bee Nugget states " Wednesday night at 8:30 o'clock Lee Wisner died at the St Helens hospital from the effects of an operation performed Monday morning. At the time of the operation there was little hope of recovery. He leaves a wife and two children.

The funeral was held on Friday afternoon from the Baptist church at 2 o'clock. Rev E. E. Duley officiating. Internment was in the Urquart cemetery. The remains were in charge of their E. C. Fissel Undertaking Company."

[NI0833] Copied from Willapa Harbor Herald, Wednesday, March 20, 2002 Page 7 (picture available)

Travis Thompson, right, received the disitinction of earning the Eagle Scout Award at the Willapa Blue and Gold Dinner and Boy Scout Court of Honor ceremony Thursday night (March 14, 2002). Pacific County Commissioner Pat Hamilton (Travis' Great Aunt), left, took part in the ceremonial Eagle Court of Honor as Travis' mom and dad, Kathy and Chris Thompson (neice to Pat Hamilton) of Raymond listen to Haamilton's reading. Approximately 75 Boys Scouts, Cub Scouts and Tiger-Cub Scouts attended the event with their family and friends. It took place at St. John's Episcopal Church in South Bend (Pacific County, Washington).

[NI0842] July 18, 2002

Libertytown resident Mark Sweadner wants to bring his extensive financial experience to the Frederick Board of County Commissioners.

The 51-year-old Republican said he is so concerned over the way the current board is managing county finances that he has filed to run for a seat on the five-member board.

Sweadner cites recent tax and rate hikes as examples of how the budget has been mismanaged. For example, in fiscal year 2001 commissioners approved a four-cent increase in the property tax rate, an increase in the county's "piggyback" income tax rate, and a hike in the water and sewer rates a year later.

"I don't like the direction the county is going," Sweadner said. "I do not think the board is operating responsibly. The ability to better use these resources must be explored and in some cases expenses must be reduced and reallocated."

Sweadner should know a thing about government finances. He worked as the City of Frederick's accountant from 1974 to 1982 and as Frederick County's budget officer from 1990 to 1997.

Sweadner also did financial work for the Carroll County government and Frederick County's Advocates for Homeless Families.

"I really enjoy working in government and I really enjoy county service," he said.

A lifelong resident of Frederick County, Sweadner is the son of Duval W. Sweadner, the founder and first president of Frederick Community College.

He and his wife, Deanna, have three children.

Sweadner graduated from Linganore High School in 1969. He received an associate's degree in business administration from FCC in 1971 and a bachelor's degree in accounting from the University of Baltimore in 1973, where he graduated magna cum laude.

Education is a top priority for Sweadner.

If elected, he would like to see funding increased for the Board of Education.

"I think the board has been short-changed in the past," he said. "We need to adequately fund our school buildings, operating supplies, teachers and other personnel. Our children are our future and we need to strive to make that future as bright as we can."

In order to adequately fund the school board, Sweadner suggests funding be cut to other county services, agencies and departments.

"We have to relocate our priorities," he said. "We may have to say no to other things. A lot of them [commissioners] can't say no. I don't mind saying no."

Sweadner also sees residential growth booming out of control. "Growth has been out of hand for quite some time now," he said. "For the past decade, we have averaged over 2,000 new housing units and over 5,000 new residents. We cannot handle this much growth. Just look at the overcrowded schools, overcrowded roads, overcrowded parks and water restrictions."

Sweadner will face 10 other Republicans in the Sept. 10 primary. The top five vote-getters from each party will advance to the Nov. 5 general election.

[NI0850] Born: 8 SEP 1157, Beaumont Palace,Oxford,England
Acceded: 3 SEP 1189, Westminster Abbey, London, England
Died: 6 APR 1199, Chalus,Limousin,France
Interred: Fontevraud Abbey, France
Notes:

Reigned 1189-1199. Prisoner in Germany 1192-1194.
A hero of Medieval legends spent all but 6 months of his reign abroad. He
became Duke of Aquitaine in 1168 and of Poitiers in 1172. He joined the 3rd
crusade in 1189 and conquered Messina and Cyprus before arriving in the Holy
Land. His victory at Arsuf gained Joppa (1191). On his way home he was capture
in Austria and was only released by Emporer Henry VI after payment of an
enourmous ransom (1194).He returned briefly to England but died in France.

Father: FitzEmpress, Henry II Curtmantle, King of England, b. 25 MAR 1133

Mother: , Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess of Aquitaine, b. ABT 1122

Married 12 MAY 1191, Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus to , Berengaria of Navarre

Child 1: , Philip of Cognac, Lord of Cognac

Associated with St Pol, Joan de

Child 2: , Fulk

[NI0871] Notes

Ref#102:
In 1666 he was the first Pastor of the first Presbyterian Church. This
was located on Broad St. in Newark, NJ. Also see note for Thomas.

Notes about the KITCHELL family; As published in "Whallon and Kitchell
Families"; by Edward Payson Whallon, 1932

Samuel Kitchell, Robert Kitchell's son, married Grace Pierson, daughter
of Rev. Abraham Pierson, pastor of the Guilford Church. Laxness of views
spreading through the colony, Dr. Abraham Pierson was asked by the
"Fundamentalists," as they classified themselves, to find a new home for
them and their church. He first organized a church at Southampton, Long
Island, and then, going to the territory now occupied by Newark, N.J
secured this for his people and sent word to them to come down as a
Colony and Church, Samuel Kitchell, his son-in-law, being with him there
from the first, as one of the founders of Newark. The Guilford Church a
people became re-established at Newark, and Dr. Abraham Pierson became
the first pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Newark. Robert
Kitchell became known as "the benefactor of Newark." Dr. Pierson's son,
Dr. Abraham Pierson, was his assistant and successor as pastor, and
became founder and first President of Yale College, his statue in bronze
now standing on the campus. The daughter, Grace Pierson Kitchell, wi
Samuel, is the mother of all the American Kitchells.

Ref#110:
One possible correction is that Abraham PIERSON married Abigail MITCHELL
1639/40 as his second wife. Sources: N.E. Marriages by Torrey, and Early
Families of Milford CT. Says that Abraham married 1639/40 "Abigail
MITCHELL - 2nd. wife?" If this is correct, then the children born after
1640 would have been the children of Abigail MITCHELL.

Ref#166:
Regarding the Abraham who m. Wheelwright. This is in big dispute,
according to genealogists more knowledgable than I on this line.


Everton Publishers, Root Cellar Search: Submitter #: 21219
Name:
CHARLES W LYON,
112 ROYAL RD
LIVERPOOL, NY 13088

Ref#248:
Children:
1.Abraham PIERSON (1641 - 5 May 1707) Lynn, Essex Co, MA
2.Thomas PIERSON (ABT 1642 - BEF 1684) Southampton, Suffolk Co, LI, NY
3.John PIERSON (1643 - BEF 1671) Southampton, Suffolk Co, LI, NY
4.Abigail PIERSON (1644 - 20 Jul 1717) Southampton, Suffolk Co, LI, NY
5.Grace PIERSON (13 Jun 1650 - 26 Apr 1690) Branford, New Haven Co, CT
6.Susanna PIERSON (10 Dec 1652 - 4 Jan 1706/07) Branford, New Haven
Co, CT
7.Rebecca PIERSON (10 Dec 1654 - 8 Nov 1732) Branford, New Haven Co,
CT
8.Theophilus PIERSON (15 Mar 1658/59 - 1713) Branford, New Haven Co,
CT
9.Isaac PIERSON (1661 - ) Branford, New Haven Co, CT
10.Mary PIERSON (ABT 1663 - ) Branford, New Haven Co, CT

[NI0878] Copied from a remembrance card.

In memory of the William Voltz born March 27, 1886 in Germany. Passed away April 8, 1966 at Vancouver, Washington. Services at Glad Tidings Church at Vancouver, Washington, Tuesday, April 12, 1966 at 10 AM. Clergy officiating Rev. Wayne Adams. Melvin Kern, Soloist. Rev. and Mrs. Wayne Adams, duet. Phyllis Layne, organist. Bearers: Emil Forsman, John Eden, Elvie Pickett, William Parrish, Dan Bottemiller, William Robinson. Final resting place: Richfield Cemetery, Richfield, Clark County, Washington. Layne's Funeral Home, Directors.

[NI0888] History of Morris County
History of Morris County New Jersey, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of prominent citizens and pioneers. Outline history of new Jersey, 1882 "May 21st 1782 Abraham Kitchel, William Ross and John Jacob Faesch, justices, and Job Allen and Ebenezer Farrand resolved to build a bridge across the Rockaway River between Stephen Jackson's and Seth Gregory's. The contract specifies the size of timbers and other particulars of the work in detail, and is signed by the above named justices and freeholders. Seth Gregory agreed to build this bridge for œ48 proclamation money, valuing a Spanish milled dollar at 7s. 6d. in hard money. The bridge was not built according to the contract, and on the 7th of October 1783 a committee appointed to inspect the bridge (viz., Stephen Jackson, Jacob Drake and Silas
Hathaway) deducted œ5 on account of timber not being according to contract

POPULAR SENTIMENT IN 1776.
The beginning of the American Revolution found the people of this county divided in sentiment. It not infrequently happened that such division was found not only in the same neighborhood, but among the members of the same family, which tended to estrangement and to create a general sense of insecurity, that rendered great caution and watchfulness necessary for public safety. Consequently we find the people in Pequannock township, fearing such dangers, at an early period in 1776 prepared to protect themselves by organizing committees of safety, vigilance committees and minute men, as they were styled. As to this we have not only the authority of tradition, but unquestioned documentary evidence. Although there doubtless were in this township some who openly favored the cause of the king, and many who, dreading the great power of England, and the possible confiscation of property, feared to openly declare their position, yet there is evidence that a majority of the leading citizens of the township, early in 1776, took a most decided stand in support of the measures of the Continental Congress.

The township record shows that public action was taken at a town meeting on the 12th of March 1776, and Joseph Hoff, Joseph Conger, William Ross, Stephen Jackson, Job Allen, Anthony Mandeville, Phineas Farrand, Hendrick Doremus, Robert Gould jr., and John Parlaman were appointed to be a committee of observation. They were selected from the western, eastern and middle parts of the township, for the purpose of watching closely those who were active in favoring the cause of the king. Subsequently a committee of safety was formed,
composed of Robert Gaston, Moses Tuttle, Stephen Jackson, Abraham Kitchel and Job Allen. An article of agreement was also drawn up and numerously signed, which was in the keeping of Stephen Jackson, a member of that committee. From him that paper came down to Colonel Joseph Jackson, his son, late of Rockaway, and a copy of it was taken by Rev. Joseph F. Tuttle. The terms of the agreement are not only of interest, but the names of the subscribers. The paper is as follows:

We, the subscribers, freeholders and inhabitants of the township of Pequannock, in the county of Morris and province of New Jersey, having long viewed with concern the avowed design of the ministry of Great Britain to raise a revenue in America, being deeply affected with the cruel hostilities already commenced in Massachusetts Bay for carrying that arbitrary design into execution, convinced that the preservation of the rights and privileges of America depends, under God, on the firm union of its inhabitants, do, with hearts abhorring slavery, and ardently wishing for a reconciliation with our parent state on constitutional principles, solemnly associate and resolve
under the sacred ties of virtue, honor and love of our country, that we will personally, and so far as our influence extends, endeavor to support and carry into execution whatever measures may be recommended by the Continental and Provincial Congresses for defending our constitution and preserving the same inviolate, according to the resolutions of the aforesaid Continental and Provincial Congresses, firmly determined by all means in our power to guard against the disorders and confusions to which the peculiar circumstances of the times may ex pose us.

"We do also further associate and agree, as far as shall be consistent with the measures adopted for the preservation of American freedom, to support the magistrates and other civil officers in the execution of their duty agreeable to the laws of the colony, and to observe the directions of our committee acting.

"Robert Gaston, John Munson, Moses Tuttle, John Gould, Joseph Conger, Edward Jackson, Elijah Leonard, Benajah Danels, Samuel Martin, Joseph Hoff, Garrett Hoff, John Hoff, Charles Hoff jr., Robert Wilson, Samuel Blair, Alexander Bates, John Reynolds, Benjamin Fairchild, James Coulter, Jonathan Johnson, John Cardy, Charles Crawley, John Robeson sen., John Robeson jr., David Vanderpool, Peter Johnson, Eliphalet Lyon, William Cough, Gershom Wiggins, James Nox, John DeBow, John White, William Upham, John Wilson, John Galloway, Richard Van Cock, James Cardiff, Joseph Holmes, Gillis McPherson, James Ronal, Thomas Price, George G. Barr, John Magie, James Norton, William Edwards, John Browne, John Wilson, Isaac Miller, Peter Little, Edward McRank, Jonathan Salsbury, Hugh Quigg, Charles Stuart, John Lee, Samuel Harris, Christian Hoffman, John Biard, John Davis, Ada Showen, J. Jackson, William Rose, Louis Demorest Dunzoy, James McUrdy, James Mitchel, James Daily, Henry Stock, Hugh Davis, John Richardson, Henry Link, Jan Bigelow, James Tharp, Daniel Talmage, Jonathan Carrington, John Wilson, Joshua Moore, Mark Walton, William Ross, David Beman, Isaac Vanduyne, Joseph Harriman, Richard Harriman, Josias Goldsmith, William Drummon, John King, Samuel Lindley, Joseph Porter, Aaron Willis, Job Allen, Stephen Jackson, Israel Youngs, Ebenezer Tuttle, Jabez Biglow, David Allen, Henry Berry jr., Joseph Rogers, Seth Mahurin,
SILAS HATHAWAY, Joseph Hull, Aaron Biglow, John Harriman, Aaron Hedden, Joseph Bedford, Isaac Ross, John Pierson, Daniel Jackson, William Fisher, Josiah Biglow, John Miller, Michael Montgomery, John McConnel, Peter Hyler, Josiah Beman, William Price, Daniel Biglow, Josiah Beman, Isaac Kelly, William Howard, Helmer Kent, Hiram Howard, James Hindes, Arthur Young, Jacob Lyon, John Peer, Luman Robeards, Benjamin Wankle, John Marinus, Daniel Hayward, Moses Stiles, Phineas Farrand, Philip Price jr., Peter Francisco, Philip Dorman, John Doremus, Philip Hiler, Samuel Farrand, Jake Harrison, Henry Young, Samuel Price, Humphrey Davenport, Thomas Welshear, Martin Frederick, Abraham Loughenner, John Esseler, Mouris Mourison, Peter Hiler jr., Brant Jacobus, Philip Holenkous, Abraham Jacobus, Cornelius A. Jacobus, Henry Hennion, John Cone, Martin Frederick sen., Hinery Mourisson, James Jacobus, Nathan Cone, Coon Vreeland, Henery Van Houten, John Pear, John Parlaman, Abraham Peer, Nicholas Hiler, Edmund Kingsland, John Hiler, Henry Lowerus, Cornelius Jacobus, James Jennings, Peter Tice, John Nix, Conrod Esler, Martin Young, Jacob Vanduyne, Jacob Hoppon, James Shane, Garret Farrall, Peter Roburds, Jacob Hiler, John Miller jr. of jrs."

Mr. Tuttle says that this paper is signed by one hundred and seventy-seven names, that some of these names are splendid specimens of penmanship, but others are scarcely legible; that eighteen signers made their mark. Doubtless, as Mr. Tuttle remarked, "many of these signers knew better how to hold a musket than a pen." It is said that "Colonel Joseph Jackson had the fact from his father that this association of Whigs in this township had 400 signers." It is believed that each member of the "committee of safety" had a copy of the foregoing agreement, and that if all those papers could be obtained we would find the names of over two hundred more signed
thereto. But the foregoing is sufficient to show that a large majority of the leading citizens were openly pronounced in their determination to support the measures of the Continental and Provincial Congresses, and to stand firmly together for self-protection amid the perilous circumstances in which they were placed.

As the war progressed many of the tories left their homes, some joining the British forces and some joining marauding bands; others, remaining at home, were often in secret communication with such, and acting as spies and informers. A great feeling of insecurity both as to life and property prevailed among the people in consequence of the outrages committed by these freebooters, who, keeping themselves concealed in the forests and swamps by day, would come upon the victims in the darkness of night. Robberies and murders were committed within the bounds of this township, it is believed, by a party under the leadership of the notorious tory brigand Claudius
Smith, who had his headquarters in the mountains near Ramapo, on the northern boundary of the State, and made frequent incursions into the upper part of New Jersey.

There appears to be good reason to believe that a robbery of the family of Charles Hoff while manager of the furnace at Hibernia was committed by a party of tories disguised with paint, and under the lead of this Claudius Smith, and that at the time these robbers told Hoff they intended to scour the whole county. The Ringwood and Ramapo Mountains, the hiding place of these freebooters, were distant only from 15 to 17 miles from Pompton; consequently the fertile farms about Pompton and Pompton Plains, as well as other parts of Pequannock, naturally attracted these hungry bands, and traditional accounts go to show that such raids were frequent. It is
related that an armed band of six one day in the dusk of early evening suddenly entered a farm house, seemingly in the pursuit of provisions; while two stood guard at the doors some went into the cellar, and others went through the rooms, hastily gathering what they could find and easily carry, and all speedily departed. After they had gone the family discovered that the dead body of a colored infant was missing, which had the same day been placed upon a stand in a room and covered with a cloth; doubtless in their hurry the robbers did not stop to examine closely what they seized upon. At one time an armed company of these tory robbers in the daytime entered the residence of John Parlaman, near Montville, when no men were about, and, hastily gathering what provisions they could find, compelled Mrs. Parlaman to surrender her jewelry, threatening her life and tearing her ear-rings from her ears. It was believed they had designs upon John Parlaman himself had he been found, for he was one of the one hundred and seventy who signed the agreement to support Congress in its measures against the king. Parlaman was a man of some note and influence in this vicinity; the records of Pequannock township show that for more than twenty years he had been elected and had served as town clerk, and was chosen to other important offices, and his penmanship indicates that he was a man of some education. This John Parlaman had a son John, who succeeded to his father's farm, where now resides the widow of the late James Doremus, who is a daughter of the latter John Parlaman.

The list of names signed to the agreement to support the American Congress contains between thirty and forty of those well known to have been residents at the time in the vicinity of Pompton Plains, Montville and Boonton. John Pierson lived at Montville and was part owner of the grist-mill there; Phineas Farrand, a nailer by trade, also lived there, but afterward removed to Hanover township. Edmund Kingsland, the forefather of the Kingslands in this township, lived near Boonton. His stone house, built in 1776 in the Dutch cottage style, with the date of its erection in large iron figures fastened on the front wall, is still standing, in good repair, at the corner of the roads near the resi dence of William G. Lathrop. Abraham Peer lived near Kingsland. The Hilers, Vanduynes, Stileses, Davenports, Marinuses, Mourisons, Eelslers and Prices were residents of Montville Valley, then called "Uylekill," and on the Hook Mountain. De Bow, Vandercook, Doremus, Vreeland, Fredericks, Jacobus and others were residents of Pompton Plains and the lands west of there. Some persons who had become conspicuous in closely watching or in sharp pursuit of tory spies and tory bands became obnoxious to them, and the tories would put a price on their heads; such were obliged for their own safety to keep away from their homes, and lodge at night in secret and out-of-the-way places.

The inhabitants of Morris, Sussex and Bergen counties during the Revolutionary war suffered severely from the depredations of the tories, and the people of Pequannock, being on the northern border of the county and near the hiding places of these desperadoes, were subject to frequent and annoying alarms. It is no wonder therefore, when living in constant fear and anxiety not only as to the open enemy but secret spies and informers in their midst, that they were active in forming committees of safety and enrolling minute men.

[NI0893] Submitted by:
Joe McGlynn


The following info is copied from "The Descendants of Andrew Ford of Weymouth Massachusetts, Part I, the first six generations" compiled by Elizabeth Cobb Stewart, published 1968, Capital City Press, Montpelier, Vermont

SAMUEL FORD (Samuel, John., James, Andrew), born in Hanover, N. J., about 1735, died in Botetourt County, Va. late in life. He married first in Hanover, 20 Jan. 1757, Grace Kitchell born about 1741, died 7 Nov. 1818, daughter of Joseph' and Rachel (Bates Kitchell). Grace's brother, Abraham Kitchell, married Charity Ford, Samuel's sister.

Another brother, Aaron Kitchell, was United States Senator from New Jersey, 1807-1811. Grace remained loyal to her husband for some time in spite of his second marriage and counterfeiting activities. In 1774 she wrote to James Kinsey, thanking him for persuading the New Jersey House that the evidence against her husband in the Treasury robbery was unreliable. She urged Kinsey to help acquit Samuel of the counterfeiting charges.

The Morris County, N. J., deed records show that Grace Ford bought land in Hanover Twp. at the Hammock from Samuel Ford and Benjamin Burroughs 1799, 1804, 1815, and deeded land in Hanover and Chatham Twps. to Stephen Young, I815. Samuel married secondly, in Ireland, about 1766, an Irishwoman of some means, who left him after they returned to America and she discovered he had another wife; and thirdly, in Virginia his partner's widow, by whom he had children (whose names have not been discovered).


Samuel Lived in Hanover Twp., at a place called "Fords Hammock on the Black Meadows. He owned Hibernia furnace and forge near Mt. Hope. N. J. In 1765 Samuel Ford of Morristown and Grace, his Wile, sold a one third interest in Hibernia to James Anderson of Newton Twp., Sussex Ca, N. J., and one third to Benjamin Cooper of the same place. Later Samuel sold the rest to 'William Alexander (Lord Sterling).

About 1765 or 1766 Samuel went to Ireland and is said to have returned with counterfeit money. In 1768 he was arrested in New York City for forging bills of credit, but was discharged for lack of evidence and returned to his farm in Hanover.

About the same time, the New Jersey Treasury was robbed of 6000 pounds.Samuel Ford was among the suspects, but the charges against him were never proved. He visited England in 1771-2 and on his return, he and his group of confederates engaged in counterfeiting in New Jersey. He was caught and jailed, but escaped to Virginia. His associates were tried and condemned, but only one was executed. Samuel’s property was sold in 1773 to satisfy his creditors.

While in Virginia, Samuel changed his name to "Baldwin" and engaged in silversmithing with a partner. His son William and Stephen Halsey visited him once and found him "a most melancholy man" who had repented of his bad conduct (Kenneth Scott, Counterfeiting in Colonial Pennsylvania, New York, 1955, p 111-133, which contains a carefully related and documented account of Samuel Ford’s career).
*******************

Descendants of Grace Kitchell and Samuel Ford Jr.

1 [4] Samuel Baldwinb: Abt. 1738 in Hanover, N.J.d: Abt. 1798 in
Botetourt Co., Va.
.+Grace Kitchellb: 1741d: November 07, 1818 in Madison, NJ
2 William Fordb: Abt. 1759d: Aft. January 15, 1793
.+Jemima Halseyb: January 02, 1762d: Aft. January 18, 1813
3 Joanna (Hannah) Fordb: 1784 in Morris Co.,N.J.d: Aft. 1850 in Dover,
NJ
.+Jesse Kingb: Abt. 1775d: Abt. 1840
4 Andrew King
4 John C Kingb: Abt. 1804d: Aft. 1850
.+Elizabeth Halsey?b: Abt. 1804d: Aft. 1850
5 Jesse Kingb: 1827
.+Catherine Butts
5 Egbert Kingb: 1830
.+Sarah Snyder
5 Elizabeth Kingb: 1836
4 William F Kingb: 1816 in New Jerseyd: March 04, 1873 in Morris
Co.,N.J.
.+Sarah Zindleb: 1813 in New Jerseyd: Aft. 1880 in New Jersey
5 David A Kingb: 1841d: January 15, 1898 in Dover, N.J.
5 Joseph D Kingb: Abt. 1842 in Morris Co.,N.J.d: December 20, 1889
.+Anna Marshb: Abt. 1844d: Aft. January 1890
6 Frank Kingb: Abt. 1872
5 William Ford Kingb: Abt. 1843
.+///
5 [1] Mulford Kingb: 1846 in Morris Co.,N.J.d: Aft. 1920
.+Eunice B. Piersonb: Abt. 1848 in Newark, NJd: January 11, 1885 in
Morris Co.,N.J.
6 Fred Kingb: 1876 in N.J.
6 Herbert Kingb: 1879 in N.J.
6 Thomas Pierson Kingb: 1884d: June 03, 1885
*2nd Wife of [1] Mulford King:
.+Abbieb: December 1867
6 Bessie Kingb: March 1882
6 Dewey Kingb: June 1898
5 John Halsey Kingb: March 1848 in Morris County, NJd: January 20,
1878 in Dover, N.J.
.+Ellen Kinneyb: 1848 in New Jersey
6 Sarah Halsey Kingb: February 12, 1873 in Dover, NJd: January 28,
1917 in St.Michaels Hospital, Newark, N.J.
.+Van Camp Bush Dullb: December 05, 1870 in Phillipsburg, NJd: November
18, 1918 in Newark, NJ
7 Bessie Mae Dullb: April 1897 in New Jerseyd: Abt. 1950 in New Jersey
.+William Wothersb: Abt. 1893 in Delaware
7 Emma Dullb: April 1899 in New jersey
7 Harry Dullb: Aft. 1900 in New Jerseyd: Bef. 1920 in New Jersey
7 Jessie Dullb: Aft. 1900 in New Jersey
7 Leroy Dullb: Aft. 1900
7 Marion Agnes Dullb: November 23, 1904 in Verona, N.J.d: February 28,
1979
.+John Joseph Burkeb: May 22, 1904d: November 18, 1980
7 Marguerite Marie Dullb: Abt. 1908 in New Jerseyd: January 02, 1931
in New Jersey
.+Herbert McGrath
7 Amber Willis Dullb: July 28, 1912 in New Jerseyd: January 05, 1991
in Newark, N.J.
.+Joseph Aloysius McGlynnb: June 18, 1896 in Hibernia, N.J.d: March 12,
1970 in Cudjoe Key, Florida
6 Anna Kingb: 1876d: Aft. 1880
5 Emma C Kingb: July 1850
.+Jacob C. Searingd: Bef. 1881
5 Guy Washington Valentine Kingb: August 1858
6 Elva Kingb: August 18, 1881
3 Nancy Fordd: 1831
.+David Kingb: Abt. 1783 in Dover,New Jerseyd: December 09, 1851 in
Dover,New Jersey
4 Andrew Kingb: Abt. 1826
4 Mary Kingb: Abt. 1830
4 Matilda Kingb: Abt. 1830
4 Harriet Kingb: Abt. 1814d: January 12, 1846 in near Dover, NJ
4 John D. Kingb: Abt. 1810 in N.J.d: October 05, 1881 in Port Oram,
Morris Co., NJ
.+Eliza Baileyb: 1812 in N.J.d: Aft. 1860
5 Mason Kingb: July 1841 in NJd: October 27, 1910 in Wharton, N.J.
.+Emmab: June 1853 in NJ
6 Frank E Kingb: December 1872
6 Mabil E Kingb: August 1877
6 Clara M Kingb: October 1880
6 Helen A Kingb: July 1893
5 Madison Kingb: July 1841 in NJd: September 13, 1919 in Wharton, N.J.
.+Mary E Kynorb: April 1844 in NJ
6 Harry M Kingb: August 1867d: June 04, 1911 in Wharton
6 Robert S Kingb: June 1873 in NJ
.+Lena B. Oliverb: 1879 in NJd: 1936 in NJ
6 Lou R Kingb: May 1887
5 Eliza Kingb: 1846d: Aft. 1877
.+John Scudderb: 1843
6 Clara Scudderb: 1868
6 Charles Scudderb: 1870
6 Fannie Bailey Scudderb: 1872d: 1931
.+Robert Straussb: 1869d: 1920
7 Harriet Straussb: 1892
7 Robert Straussb: 1894d: 1959
.+Gladys Dorothy Allshireb: 1899d: 1987
6 Hattie Scudderb: 1874
6 John Scudderb: 1877
5 John Kingb: 1848d: March 30, 1852 in Jefferson Twp, Morris Co.,NJ
5 Harriet Kingb: 1840
.+John W Armstrong
5 William Kingb: 1832
5 Edward Kingb: 1834d: March 07, 1905
.+Sarah E. ///b: 1839 in Dover, N.J.d: 1934 in Dover , N.J.
5 Elmore Kingb: 1836
4 Jemima Kingd: Bef. 1850
.+Moses Powd: Bef. 1850
5 Edwina Powb: 1840
5 Susan Powb: 1842
.+James Vanover
3 Elizabeth Ford
.+John Young
3 William Fordd: April 1870
.+Phebe Bailey
3 James Fordb: January 24, 1790d: May 1888
.+Charity Kitchellb: 1798d: December 1875
3 Anthony Fordb: 1783d: April 23, 1791
3 [2] Catherine Fordd: in Binghampton, NY
.+John K. Piersond: in Binghampton, NY
*2nd Husband of [2] Catherine Ford:
.+John K Pierson
3 Julia Fordb: 1801d: 1883
.+William Minton
3 Maria Ford
.+Thomas Sturtevant
3 George Ford
3 John Ford
2 Betseyb: Abt. 1761d: Aft. 1824
.+Samuel Gardner
2 [3] Phebe Fordb: August 01, 1770d: July 19, 1852 in ]
.+Moses Rossd: 1803 in Morris County, NJ
3 William Rossb: 1790
*2nd Husband of [3] Phebe Ford:
.+Robert Marvin
3 Samuel Marvin
.+Julia Place
4 Jerome Place Marvin
.+Martha Stokes
5 Mabel Marvin
.+Scott Pierce
6 Marvin Pierce
.+Pauline Robinson
2 Samuel Fordb: Abt. 1767d: Aft. May 30, 1826
.+Elizabeth Reeveb: March 27, 1770d: August 14, 1809
3 Freeman W Fordb: September 21, 1791
3 Mary Fordb: Abt. 1806
3 Nathan R Fordb: Abt. 1793d: July 1819
2 Mary (Polly) Fordb: February 1763d: 1798
.+Stephen Halsey
*2nd Wife of [4] Samuel Ford:
.+Mary Willsd: Abt. 1811
2 Elizabeth Baldwinb: Abt. 1779d: Bef. 1869
.+Robert Harrah
2 Sarah Baldwinb: Abt. 1781d: Bef. 1869
.+Richard Collins
2 William Baldwinb: Abt. 1782d: February 27, 1853
2 Johannah Morris Baldwinb: Abt. 1784d: Bef. 1869
.+George Kincaid
2 Thomas Lewis Baldwinb: 1785d: 1872
.+Elizabeth Cobb
2 Mary Jane Baldwinb: June 10, 1789d: December 27, 1832
.+James Wills
2 Charity Baldwinb: Abt. 1790d: March 03, 1849
.+Dawson Haggard

[NI0894] Kitchell, Aaron (1744-1820) Born in Hanover, N.J., July 10, 1744. Member of New Jersey state legislature,
1781; U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1791-93, 1795-97, 1799-1801; U.S. Senator from New Jersey,
1805-09. Died June 25, 1820. Interment at Presbyterian Churchyard, Hanover, N.J.

Presbyterian Churchyard
Hanover (Morris County), New Jersey

Politicians buried here:

Aaron Kitchell (1744-1820) Born in Hanover, N.J., July 10, 1744. Member of New Jersey state legislature,
1781; U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1791-93, 1795-97, 1799-1801; U.S. Senator from New Jersey,
1805-09. Died June 25, 1820. Interment at Presbyterian Churchyard.

"The History of the Willis Family", which follows :

"Aaron Kitchell had one unfortunate episode in his life. Some time after the death of his first wife he contemplated a second marriage and rode forth to call on a lady he knew to ask her to marry him. There was a siren lurking in his path, in form an attractive widow, who had already been three times married and had two children by her first husband, her last venture having been with William Willis, a brother of our great-grandfather Russel Willis. Her maiden name was Wilson.

Well, this attractive widow suspected the errand of our cavalier ancestor, and as he was passing her house she intercepted him and invited him in. He, of course, could do no less than accept, and the dashing widow, having had much experience, Mr. Kitchell proposed and was at once accepted on this his first visit.

"Marry in haste and repent at leisure" proved but too true in this instance, as the gay widow turned out to be a shrew with a terrible temper and he could not live with her. She was also a schemer, and when her husband died carried away for her two children and herself everything she conveniently could. About the only article of silverware that escaped her notice was a pair of sugar-tongs, now a treasured possession of Miss Frances C. Willis, his great-great- granddaughter".

The chronology is skewed; William was her first husband, followed by Ebenezer Howard and Barnabas Winds. How could Miss Willis be Aaron's g-g-gd ? Either age mellowed her, or the story is apocryphal. Her own Declaration shows her to be a bit different:
____________________________________________________________________________________
Dailyrecord.com - Parsippany,NJ,USA
... The land around the church was used as a cemetery, and today it contains hundreds of graves, including those of Aaron Kitchell, the first New Jersey congressman ...

11/13/06 - Posted from the Daily Record newsroom
JOHN BELL / DAILY RECORD
The First Presbyterian Church of Hanover held worship services today at its historic site in East Hanover after a five-month hiatus. The historic church spent more than $500,000 for renovations that included replacing a leaky roof.

JOHN BELL / DAILY RECORD
Lay Pastor Rich Banas delivers the sermon during worship services at First Presbyterian Church of Hanover on Sunday. Here he looks up to preach to members of the congregation sitting in the balcony.

East Hanover congregation back home 'closer to God'

First Presbyterian Church completes $503K repairs to 171-year-old building

BY TIEN-SHUN LEE
DAILY RECORD

EAST HANOVER -- For seven years after he joined the First Presbyterian Church of Hanover in 1999, carpenter and contractor Steven Dick looked at his church's leaky and dilapidated roof during services and thought, "I've got to fix that."

Dick finally got his chance to do the fixing this year, after members of the historic church applied for and received over $300,000 in grant money from the Morris County Preservation Trust to renovate their 171-year-old building, which is on the state and national registers of historic places.

On Sunday, after about five months of attending church services in a temporary location across the street, congregation members came together for the first time in their newly renovated church.

"It feels great," Dick said. "I've been looking at that (roof) since I got back from doing hurricane relief work in the Virgin Islands (seven years ago)."

Dick helped fix one of the church's five tiers of roofing. That roof, located above the church's choir area, had been leaking and falling apart for years, church members said.

"If it was raining, it would leak," parishioner Sandra Mackowiak recalled. "Now it's all fixed. It's exciting. It's just wonderful to be back in there, to be closer to God."

Robin Van Dyk, a substitute organist for the church, said pieces of ceiling plaster used to fall on top of the organ while she was playing.

"There was a hole in the ceiling before. Now (the church) looks gorgeous. I just love playing the pipe organ again after all these months of playing the keyboard," she said, referring to the instrument in the church's temporary location.

Bat visitors

In addition to fixing the roof above the choir, workers also repaired four other roof tiers, renovated four spires on top of the bell tower, installed lightning rods and cleaned up the church attic, which had been infested with about 500 bats, said Charlie Rieser, a member of the church's restoration committee.

To prevent bats from reinfesting the church, workers put in two strings of low-wattage bulbs.

"With the light, bats will not hibernate there," Rieser explained.

It cost $8,500 just to replace insulation and clean inside the church attic, which had been filled with bat dung, Rieser said.

In total, the renovations cost $503,000, Rieser said. The grant money from the Morris County Preservation Trust was supplemented by $112,000 raised by the church restoration committee.

The original First Presbyterian Church was founded in 1718 in Whippany, according to Betty Albert, the church historian and sexton. That church became run down and cramped, so congregants began looking for another place to build a church.

The land at the corner of Mount Pleasant Avenue and Hanover Road was donated to the church, so some church members decided to build the church there. Others split off and started churches in Morristown and Parsippany.

It cost about $3,000 to build the East Hanover church in 1835, Albert said.

Extensive history

The land around the church was used as a cemetery, and today it contains hundreds of graves, including those of Aaron Kitchell, the first New Jersey congressman, and Jacob Green, a leading abolitionist and founding member of the New Jersey Constitution who served as the church's reverend from 1745 to 1790.

Also buried on the site are many victims of the smallpox epidemic of the 1770s, 52 soldiers from the Revolutionary War, three soldiers from the War of 1812, eight Civil War soldiers, one soldier from World War I and two soldiers from World War II.

In 1977, the First Presbyterian Church of Hanover was placed on the state and national registers of historic places. Because the church is an official historic site, it must be restored with the same materials that it was originally made out of.

Now that the upper parts of the church have been restored, members of the church are hoping to secure grant money to fix the sides of the church. The restoration committee has applied for about $435,000 worth of grant money for that second phase of renovation, Rieser said.

[NI0895] Declaration of Phebe Willis Kitchel aged 85 3rd July 1838

I am now the widow of Aaron Kitchel esq. & when married to said Aaron Kitchel, I was the widow of Barnabas Winds, to whom I was married by Rev. James Richards on the 6th July, 1803. I was, when married to Barnabas Winds, the widow of Ebenezer Howard, to whom I was married by the same Rev. James Ricker on the 7th December, 1796. And when I married Ebenezer Howard, I was the widow of William Willis, my first husband, to whom I was married by Lemuel Bowers esq., a Justice of the peace, before the war of the revolution began & according to the best of my rememberance, it was just about the time when the Tea was thrown over board in the Boston harbor. I was married in the month of March, to the best of my recollection & belief & I was 20 years old on the 28th May following. I was 85 years old on the 28th May last. The precise day of the month & the particular number of the year I cannot now remember & I have no family now. The family bible which I had & was the property of William Willis, my first husband, & contained a record of our marriage & the births of our children, kept by said Willis, was destroyed about the year 1794 or 1795, by a flood which swept away our dwelling house & all our furniture. I was then a widow, living at Boonton, in Hanover, Morris County, near the banks of the Rockaway river. A very severe rain falling suddenly swelled the stream which broke the dam of the Iron works above & the water from the dam rushed in a torrent upon my little habitation, & washing away my furniture & house & has never been found. I was married at the house of James Anderson in Boonton & I do not know a single individual now living who was present at the marriage, except Joseph Willis, the brother of my husband, who, if living, is supposed to reside in Berkshire, Massachusets, of which state I believe my husband, Wm. Willis, was a native. I had two daughters, Hannah and Betsey, born before the war began, and one son (Joseph) & one daughter, Sally, born in time of the war. Sally, the youngest of the 4 is 56,& Betsey, the eldest by birth of all my children if now living, would be 62 years old, or 63, I cannot tell which with certainty. I had 3 others, born after peace, viz. John, James & Weltsey.

My claim for a pension from the U. States is grounded upon the Militia service of my first husband, William Willis, in the war of the revolution, which was rendered by him as I verily believe, in every year of said war, from beginning to its' close. I cannot specify nor particulain his services, the times when, places where, nor all the names of his officers under whom he served. I know he was much from home in the service, that I have often furnished him with a knapsack of provisions for his journey, & seen him march off with his musket on his shoulder after taking leave of his family, leaving me with the care & charge of our children, & of his out door actions whilst he was defending his Country, hazarding his life for her freedom. I have often heard him speak of the skirmishes & battles of Springfield, Monmouth, Connecticut farms, Acquackanonck, Short hills, Ash Swamp, & etc. I have often heard him speak of his Militia services under General Winds, Colonel Ford, Colonel Seely, Colonel Hathaway, Captain Ward, Captain Allen, & others, under whom, as his commanding officers, I believe, he performed Militia duties in defense of the United States in the revolutionary war. I do not know that he ever received any commission, or written discharge, or other documentory evidence of his services. For the details & particulars of his services, I must refer the Commissioners of pensions to such few of his comrades & associates as may yet survive & whose testimony I may yet be able obtain. Most of them, I believe, are dead. Robert Young I have seen & talked with the other day. He was well known to my husband & was well acquainted with me before our marriage & was frequently with William Willis on Military duty in time of the war. James Kitchel was also well acquainted with him, and was sometimes with him performing Military duty. To their testimony & such others as I hope to obtain, I would respectfully refer the Commissioner of pensions.

I have stated that my marriage to William Willis was in March, but on further reflection, I think it was in April.

I was born in Newark, Essex County, N. Jersey, & moved to Hanover in Morris Co. when a girl, about the time when Col. Sam'l Ogden built Boonton Slitting Mill & works, some 6 or 8 years before the war began, & was married as at first stated to William Willis when in my 20th year. He died in the year 1793. Aaron Kitchel esq., my last husband, lived in Hanover when he married me. We were married by the Rev. Samuel L. Phelps, Minister of the Gospel in Parsippany, Morris Co. on the 29th June, 1809.Said Aaron Kitchel died at his residence in Hanover, which is now my home, July 1820, according to the best of my recollection & belief & I have remained his widow till the present time.

Lewis Condict, on July 20, 1838, described Phebe as "very poor & anxious for such relief as the justice of the case may be found to remit". Phebe's pension was for the amount of $37 per annum ,and commenced retroactive to March 4, 1831. She received $407, issued 25 Sept. 1841. In 1841, she resided in Morristown. She apparently died Dec. 23, 1841. Some sources say she was living in Newark. Her parents are a complete mystery to me. Anyone have any ideas? Take care, Kevin

[NI0898] Asa Kitchell

MALE
BIRTH: 28 Oct 1748, Morris County, New Jersey, America [Ref#198,#243,#244]
DEATH: 12 Dec 1816, Cincinnati, Ohio [Ref#198]
NOTE : 12 May 1775, Had children baptised at Hanover, Morris County, New Jersey, America [Ref#243]
NOTE : 7 May 1775, Received at Hanover Church. [Ref#243]
BAPTISM: 20 Nov 1748, Hanover, Morris County, New Jersey, America [Ref#243]
NOTE : Jun 1811, Could be died date. [Ref#244]

Father: Joseph Kitchell ....(25 Jan 1711/12 ~ 24 Dec 1789 ) Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, America
Mother: Rachel Bates ....(1714 ~ 24 Dec 1789 )

Family 1: Rhoda Baldwin ....(? ~ )

MARRIAGE: 11 Jul 1770, Hanover, Morris County, New Jersey, America [Ref#198,#243]

1.Anna Kitchell ....(9 Aug 1771 ~ ) Morris County, New Jersey, America S» C»
2.Abigail Kitchell ....(28 Dec 1774 ~ 18 Jan 1836) Morris County, New Jersey, America S» C»
3.Benajah Kitchell ....(22 Oct 1776 ~ 19 Jun 1814) Morris County, New Jersey S» C»
4.Grace Kitchell ....(10 Jun 1779 ~ 4 Oct 1792) Morris Co., N.J.
5.Joseph Kitchell ....(31 Jul 1780 ~ 7 Apr 1843) Morris Co., N.
6.Timothy Kitchell ....(30 Nov 1781 ~ 3 Jan 1793) Morris County, New Jersey, America
7.Tryphena Kitchell ....(16 Apr 1785 ~ ) Morris County, New Jersey, USA S»
8.Wickliffe Kitchell ....(21 May 1789 ~ 2 Jan 1869) Morris Co., N.J. S» C»

[NI0904] Declaration of James Kitchel ,esq. age 79 July 3 , 1838

I am in the 79th year of my age, was a Militia soldier of Morris county in the revolutionary war & was well aquainted with William Willis who married Phebe Wilson. Said Willis lived in Hanover township & within about 3 miles of my father's residence. We often performed Militia duty in the same company & regiments.

In the summer of 1776 I was stationed at Elizabeth town point under Capt. Isaac Halsey & recollect William Willis was there performing Militia duty at the same place , under Capt. Josiah Hale & Col. Munson one month. In the fall of the same year , Willis was performing guard duty under Capt. Hall at Elizabeth town when Gen'l Washington's retreating army passed through, followed by the enemy. Hall's company, with Willis fell in the rear of the main army & retreated with them as far as New Brunswick. The Militia seperated from the main army near Brunswick & returned to Morris County by Baskingridge & Veal town. Willis was out on this tour not less than six weeks.

Early in December of '76, the enemy came over from Staten Island by Elizabeth town through Connecticut Farms as far as Springfield, where Gen'l Heard, commanding the Militia, fought a battle with them. Willis was present & engaged , under Capt. Hall & Col. Munson's regiment. Col. Ford, Col. Drake , Major Bott were all present. Col. Spenser had his horse shot under him. A body of Hessians , or Waldeckers, 70 or 80 in number, were made prisoner & sent to Morristown. Willis & his company were stationed a month between Springfield & Elizabeth town performing guard duty.

Whilst the enemy were encamped in New Brunswick & Amboy, Capt. Hall enlisted a company of men to form 3 months.William Willis & myself both enlisted in Capt. Hall's company for that period & served out the enlistment that winter along the lines near Woodbridge, Amboy, & New Brunswick in the winter of 1777. Gen'l. Winds commanded and was stationed near Quibble town. Colonels Seely, , Munson, Drake with their regiments were there all winter, & there was much fighting & skirmishing with patrols of the enemy. Willis & myself were discharged in the spring, having served 3 months.

In May & June following I served a month near Pompton performing guard duty under the orders of Gen'l Winds & Col. Seely. Willis performed the same duty a month at that place & in its' neighborhood in Capt. Hall's company.

I was with Willis a month in Bergen County near Hackensack & in an attack upon a fort called Pollifly under command of Col. Seely & Gen'l Winds. I was with Willis a month at Haverstraw on the Hudson river near the Jersey line under command of Col. Seely. There was a skirmish with the enemy there in which Willis got a knapsack from them, which by Willis was always after known & called "the Haverstraw sack". This was soon after the burning of Esopus & the taking of Burgoyne.

Willis was with me on a month tour of Militia duty at & near Acquackanonck under Gen'l Winds & Col. Seely in the fall of the year. There was a severe fight with the enemy at Acquackanonck bridge- a large Militia force present. Colonels Frelinghuysen, Hathaway & Hays with their regiments.

He was with me at the battle of Connecticut farms in May 1780, under the same officers & after the burning of the Church & village , the enemy retired & we guarded the lines a month near elizabeth town. I remember him at Sprinfield in the same summer (80), when a severe battle was fought & the enemy burned the Church & the town & retreated through Elizabeth town to Staten Island. Gen'l. Winds commanded the Militia & Colonels Dayton & (?) the continental troops. I believe Capt. Job Allen commanded our company at Connecticut farms & Springfield.

In the sring of '81, I remember Willis on a months' tour of Militia duty at Chatham & another month in the fall season at Elizabeth town point in the fall of the year in which Cornwallis surrendered. In some of Willis' Militia duties, I believe he was under Capt. Jonas Ward's command & perhaps in some instances I may have mistaken the names of his Captain in particular tours. Willis was a New England man, employed by Col. Sam'l Ogden at Boonton Iron works & then he married Phebe Wilson before the war broke out. Willis died some 18 or 21 years after their marriage & his widow married one Howard who died after a few years & she married Barnabas Winds , who lived but a year or two & died. His widow married Aaron Kitchel, my uncle, in June 1808, with whom she lived 'till Juny 1820, when he died & the said Phebe whose first husband was William Willis before mentioned is still living & is at this day the widow of said Aaron Kitchel & is an applicant for a pension on acc't of the Militia revolutionary services of said William Willis.

[NI0928] 163. Mary (Mercy)7 Parkhurst (Benjamin6, Benjamin5, George4, John3, Christopher2, George1) was born in
Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ before 1721. Mary died December 14, 1789 in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ, at 69
years of age. Her body was interred in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ at Hanover Grave Yard. Mercy's gravestone
says that she died "in the 66th year of her age". She most likely was a few years older than that since she was
named in her father's will dated 1721 as the second youngest daughter.

She married John Kitchell in New Jersey, about 1753. John was born in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ February 2,
1713/14. John was the son of Abraham Kitchell and Sarah Bruen. John died January 9, 1777 in Hanover, Morris
Co., NJ, at 62 years of age. His body was interred in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ at Hanover Grave Yard.

Mary (Mercy) Parkhurst and John Kitchell had the following children:

385 i. Benjamin8 Kitchell was born in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ.

386 ii. Bethune Kitchell was born in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ.

387 iii. David Kitchell was born in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ June 6, 1754. David died February 15, 1836 at 81
years of age. He married Rachel Bates.

388 iv. Phineas Kitchell was born in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ August 14, 1763. Phineas died July 29, 1853 at
89 years of age. He married Esther Mulford.

389 v. Josiah Kitchell was born in Hanover, Morris Co., NJ April 9, 1769. Josiah died May 5, 1825 at 56 years
of age. He married Sarah Ball.

[NI0941] Uzal Kitchell

MALE
BIRTH: ? [Ref#169]
DEATH: AFT 1790 [Ref#243]
NOTE : One of the first to enlist in the Continental Army. [Ref#16
NOTE : ABT 1768, Built home. [Ref#169]
NOTE : ABT 1776, Joined Geo. Washington's forces in Revolution. [Ref#169]
NOTE : Had 5 children. [Ref#169]
NOTE : 1781-1782, Tax collector in Hanover, New Jersey. [Ref#169]

RELIGION: Received at Hanover Church.

Father: David Kitchell ....(1723 ~ 26 Dec 1753 )
Mother: Ruth Tuttle ....(1713 ~ 4 Apr 1780 )

Family 1: Joanna ? ....(? ~ AFT 1790 )

1.Jared Kitchell ....(? ~ ) S» C»
2.David Kitchell ....(ABT 1770 ~ )
3.Jabez Kitchell ....(ABT 1779 ~ )
4.? Kitchell ....(ABT 1781 ~ )
5.Jared Kitchell ....(ABT 1785 ~ )

[NI0970] As told by Bryan on his web page

My Folks And Their (Old) House In Seattle

This is dedicated to my wonderful parents, Elaine and (Step Father) Phil. We moved into the house in 1962 (the year of the Seattle World's Fair) after my father retired from the Navy. With several of us kids, it was a tight squeeze and all we could afford but it was OURS! The yard was sparse – mostly weed-infested lawn. The far right portion of the main floor was half-study and half-single car garage. We expanded the study into the garage. Later, we built the separate 2-car garage/workshop (with half-bath).

After my mom divorced my father, she found solace in gardening. She took to it like a duck to water - everything she touched grew like crazy (that's why the yard is like a jungle)! Then, she found the love of her life in Phil. I found a wonderful, generous, funny man that I am proud to know. After retiring, Phil didn't sit still - finding plenty to do in his interests: R/C Modeling, Model-A restoration (a '30 Coupe and then a '29 Roadster), cabinet work, and gunsmithing - he's a pretty good shot!

Myself, before getting out on my own, I spent my time involved in Amateur Radio (I had a fairly good "antenna farm") which "kept me off the streets and out of the pool halls". Later, I became a "motor-head" with my 340-S Barracudas. I spent lots of time tinkering with my cars, making them better, faster, and more reliable. I couldn't have done it without their understanding, patience, and love. Thank you, Mom & Phil!

Now, they've decided to move to "Aridzona", where property taxes are lower, and the sun shines 364 days/year. I've seen their new house and they will met a few of their new neighbors (nice folks). Though I'll miss having them close-by, I understand their desire and need to move. I'll keep my guest room available for them to come up here for as long as they want to stay (I expect one hot summer in Arizona will make them itchy for the more temperate climate of the Pacific Northwest).

[NI0971] Here are my bios: birthdate: 8-12-57, born in: Bainbridge, MD
lived in Seattle from 1964 til graduation from Nathan Hale H.S. in '75. Enlisted in the Army '75-'77, ended up in San Diego from then til 1981, married first husband Jim Lovell in 1982-1994, have 5 children: Andrea, 5-30-79; James(Jimmy), 2-19-82; Matthew, 8-13-83; Carol, 2-23-88; and David, 7-7-89. Currently married to Randy Lundgren since 2-9-07. Yeahh, we're newlyweds

[NI0994] Copy from a birth announcement.

Announcing the arrival of a girl on Dec. 9, 1939, wait five pounds, five ounces, name Sharon Leora Swadener, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Gail Swadener.

The copy from a newspaper obituary [newspaper unknown]. Sharon Leora Swadener, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Gail Swadener, of 1301 South G. Street, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington died Dec. 8, 1939. Funeral services were held on Wednesday at 2 PM at the Fort Lewis Chapel, with internment in the Fort Lewis Cemetery.

[NI1060] Information submitted by Jack V. Williams

On 30 Oct 1907 Henry Cline Mills m. 2nd to the widow Mrs. Irene (Ketchell) Myers at Visalia, Tulare County, California, daughter of Edward Cobb Kitchell and Anna Barnes. From the 1900 Census of Tulare Co (Enum. Dist. 66, sheet 2, Line 73) it is known that Irene (Kitchell) Myers had 3 children (all then living). Shown living with Irene is one of them, her daughter the widowed Ruth (Myers) Lovell who had 2 children (all then living).

Lucy Shepherd m. Henry Cline Mills on 20 Dec 1849 in the Talbot District, Norfolk County, Ontario Canada. Lucy was b. 18 May 1826 in New York, and d. 6 Feb 1901 in Tulare Co. California. Henry was b. 19 Feb 1828 in Canada, and d. 14 Sep 1917 in Tulare Co., California.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E-mail from Jack V. Williams

I'm embarrassed to see I have committed the cardinal sin of misspelling Irene's name :o( It is of course Kitchel (it is spelled Kitchell on her marriage license to Henry.). On the licence her parents are given as "E. C. Kitchell" and "Annie Barnes," both born in New York. Irene is shown born in Ohio. If you will accept an attachment from me I will be happy to send you a scan of the licence. Let me know.

As mentioned below, Henry and Irene married on 30 Oct 1907. Henry Cline Mills was born in Canada to John Mills (b. 12 Nov 1795 in Pennsylvania, d. 15 Sep 1877 in Canada), and Elizabeth Cline (11 Dec 1794 in Maryland, d. 30 Jun 1866). Henry and family emigrated to the U.S. in 1858, settling in Michigan until 1882 when he, Lucy and 4 of their 10 children removed to California (one of them my Grandfather)

Henry's son George, daughter Cora, and obviously wife Lucy all died in Tulare County before Henry married Irene. I mention this because according to the 1900 Census, Irene was a Nurse by profession, and it causes me to wonder if she may have met Henry will attending to some of his family.

I have yet to determine when Irene died, but have ordered some obituaries of the Lovells that died in Tulare County (Irene's daughter Ruth married a Lovell). Perhaps they may provide some clues. In any case I will keep you apprised. And, feel free to add my information to your database.

Let me know about the attachment.

Jack in California

[NI1127] Obituaries: Ivon Bailey Sr.
Ivon John Bailey Sr., 60, of 1239 Boyer Street, died Wednesday at United States Veterans Medical Center in Portland, Oregon.

Gravesite funeral services will be at 2 PM Monday at Mountain View Cemetery in the World War II section. Reverend Don Rohn and Howard Forest will officiate. Relatives and friends may meet at the Herring Funeral Home at 1:30 PM.

Davis born May 20, 1920 in Chehalis, the son of Ivon and Laura Kitchel Bailey. He attended grade school in Adna, Washington, and high school in Onalaska, Washington.

After school he enlisted in United States Navy for 21 years. He served in the Southeast Asian theater and was held captive by the Japanese for three years and three months. He was released on VJ Day and returned to the Bremerton Naval Hospital for six months.

He received a Purple Heart and Presidential Unit Citation and 12 other medals while serving with the Navy. He married Thelma Jean Schubert, Sept. 29, 1946, in Bremerton, Washington. They lived there for more than a year and any returned to active duty on the U.S.S. Marias. He was in California from 1956 to 1959.

He became the Naval Personnel Recruiter in Walla Walla for a while. He returned to see duty of the U.S.S. Navarro while his family continue to live in Walla Walla.

He was employed by the Washington State Employment Security Office in Walla Walla has a veterans representative.

He was a member of Grant Farmer Post No. 992 V. F. W.; American Legion of Waitsburg and BPOE No. 287 of Walla Walla. He was Immediate past Commander of the Grant Farmer Post and was past president of the American Legion.

Bailey is survived by his wife, at home; two daughters, Laura Jean Gallagher of Walla Walla and Kathleen Ann Macintosh of Spokane; two sons, Alan Bailey of Walla Walla and Ivon Bailey Jr. of Moses Lake; a sister, Cathilene Thorsted of Bothell; a half brother, Boyd Foley of Roseburg, Oregon; his mother of Myrtle Creek, Washington; and six grandchildren. A son, Robin Bailey, and a brother William Bailey, preceded him in death.

Memorial contributions may be made to the V. F. W. building fund, the American Heart Fund, or to the charity of the donor's choice.

Navy Medals received: Good Conduct, Purple Heart, Pre-Pearl Harbor, Asiatics and Pacific Theatre, Asiatics Occupation, Korean Defense, United Nations Service, National Defense Service, Presidential Unit Citation, American Campaign, World War II Victory, China Service, Korean Service, and Philippine Defense.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
As told by Grace Peterson-Johnson

Ivon Bailey was Aunt Toot's (Laura's) son. He was the same age as Leora. When he was about 7 his dad took him and Billy and put them in an orphanage in Lacey. Aunt May and Uncle Charlie went and got the two boys out. Ivon was in the 6th or 7th grade when he came back from the orphanage. They (Aunt May/Charlie) adopted them. They kept Ivon until he was a sophmore or junior in high school. Ivan kept stealing things and they couldn't handle him. Uncle Lloyd and Aunt Effie then took him and he graduated high school in Onalaska. He started charging things against Uncle Lloyds account at the local store and Uncle Lloyd and Aunt Effie then took him back to his mom (Aunt Toots). He got into trouble again, this time with the law, and had the choice of jail or the service. He chose to join the Navy. He was stationed on Bataan when the war broke out. When the Japanese captured them they marched them across the Phillipines (the Death March) where they were put on a cattle ship and sent to Japan and from there to Mancheria (sp?) He worked in the gardens and was able to steal carrots and such which kept him alive. Ivon told mom this himself. When the war was over he was skin and bones and had ulcer sores all over his body. He was hospitalized for a long time. He then had the choice of a disability discharge from the navy or to stay in. He chose to stay in. He married and had four kids, the fifth drowned. The last time she saw him he was on his way to eastern Washington (she thinks Pendleton) as a navy recruiting officer. He retired there and afterwards someone told her he was working at the post office until he died. They had two boys and two girls and a son that drowned. The youngest boy's nickname was Winky.

[NI1152] No humor detected in droopy bouquet Fellow City Council member said Valentine's Day gift a joke

Associated Press Saturday, February 16, 2002

RAYMOND, Wash. _ To Ed Norman, the Valentine's Day gift to fellow City Council member Vicki Flemetis was a joke.
To Flemetis, the wilted brown roses were a sign there's no love lost between them.

"This is a fine example that chivalry is dead," Flemetis said after receiving the bouquet Thursday afternoon. Flemetis earlier this week cast one of two votes opposing Norman's appointment to an empty seat on the City Council. She told The Daily World of Aberdeen that she
thought the appointment was inappropriate, since Norman had been decisively defeated in last November's mayoral race by a write-in candidate.

When Norman dropped off the droopy brown bouquet at City Hall, he told the clerks it was a Valentine's Day gift for Flemetis. "His exact words were that he wanted to thank her for the nice things she said about him in the paper," said Janet Jarvi, the city clerk and treasurer. "We just said we would give them to her."

Norman said Friday that the roses had been awarded to his wife two weeks ago and, rather than throw them out, he decided to give them to Klemetis as a joke. "I worked with Vicki the last four years. It's nothing personal," he said. "It's a fun game. I think you shouldn't take your job too seriously." Flemetis wasn't laughing.

"You don't know if it's threatening, or ... if it's a joke gone bad, or you don't know really how to take it," Flemetis said. "It's not something that is very flattering to a person. "I'm sorry he didn't appreciate my honesty, but I'm not sorry I said it." Norman said he was surprised the roses caused a stir.

"Can't anybody take a joke anymore?" he said. "I certainly wouldn't think she'd take that any other way than a joke. "She's the deputy coroner who goes out and looks at dead bodies all the time. Certainly dead roses wouldn't bother her."

[NI1163] Copied from The Pacific County Press, February 20, 2002 Page 9

STUDENT OF THE MONTH

The following students were chosen as Students of the Month by the Willapa Harbor Lions Club

Willapa Valley senior Tia Flemetis was chosen as Student of the Month by the Willapa Harbor Lions Club. Her honors and accomplisments include being varsity basketball captain, football home-coming queen 2001 and Student of the week three times.

She belongs to FBLA, Pep Club, and Booster Club. She was active in the Relay for Life, helped out at the Fair and was Senior class treasurer. She played varsity basketball, helped out with Biddy Ball and the annual community cleanup. She was also in Who's Who Among American High School Students.

Tia's future goals include attending Grays Harbor Community College and entering the nursing field to earn a registered nurses license. She would like to work with infants once she receives her RN certificate. Her parents are Steve and Cindy Flemetis.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Copied From Willapa Harbor Herald, Wednesday, March 13, 2002, page 3

Flemetis chosen as Citzen of the Week By Jenn Todd

Tia Flemetis, a senior at Willapa Valley High School, was chosen as this week's Citzen of the Week for her involvement in school activities and in the community. Flemetis is very active in many school clubs and activities including Pep Club, FBLA, yearbook, basketball and more. Flemetis is treasure of the Valley's Senior Class, which has been saving since the seventh grade for their senior trip. Last summer, Flemetis and her classmates worked at the Ward Creek Racetracks to help raise money for their trip.

Flemetis has been playing basketball since the fourth grade, and this year she got to make the trip to Spokane for the 2002 state WIAA/Dairy Farmers of Washington B Basketball Championship, in which the Viking Girls took seveth place out of 16. Flemetis also participates in "BittyBall", which is a children's basketball program out of Willapa Valley.

For the past four years, Flemetis has been voted into the "Who's who among American High School Students" publication, and she was recently voteed locally as Student of the Month for December. Flemetis spends a lot of time working as an Office Aide at the school. She update's the school's web pages, and according to Principal Rob Friese, "she can always be found straightening and fixing things around school.

Flemetis agrees, "I'm a neat freak, bad," she said. "If there's a picture on the wall that's crooked, I'll go and get the ladder and fix it." During the Pacific County Fair, Flemetis helps out in the Valley Booster Club food booth as well as at the FireFighters' Salmon Dinner.

Flemetis has lots of family in the area. She is the youngest sibling with four older brothers. She has a nine-year-old nephew and a new baby neice who's three months old. "I love kids," she said. "If I'm not working, I'm usually babysitting for my family."

Flemetis works part time at One Moore Cup in Raymond. She plans on attending Grays Harbor college after graduation to pursue a career in nursing.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Copied from the July 5, 2006, Willapa Harbor Herald

Flemetis, Channell to Wed Sept. 30

Jeremy Channell and Tia Flemetis would like to announce their engagement. The exchange of vows will be held September 30, 2006, at the United Methodist Church in Montesano (WA). The reception will take place at the Rotary Log Pavillion.

The bride is the daughter of Steve and Cindy Flemetis of Raymond. She is a 2002 Willapa Valley High graduate and is employed at Westport Shipyard as an Administrative office assistant.

The groom is the son of Chuck and Carla Channell and Judy and Ron Stiles of Westport. He is a 1996 Ocosta High School graduate and is employed at the Westport Shipyard, where he is in charge of kitting composite material.

[NI1168] Back taxes return to haunt new treasurer
By Anne Radford - Daily World Writer
Saturday, January 6, 2007 1:13 AM PST
Print Version | E-mail This Story

Pacific County Treasurer-elect Renee Goodin was not allowed to assume office the first week of her term, which officially began on New Year’s Day, because a bonding company backed out of issuing her a bond when it discovered she owes back property taxes.

Goodin, who was elected in Nove_mber, got confirmation Friday that she has been approved for the $150,000 bond and expects to begin conducting the duties of her office next week.

In the meantime, she will still not have the authority to act as treasurer or direct her employees to act on her behalf - which was the case this week - until the County Commissioners meet on Tuesday to review the situation, Bryan Harrison, the county administrative officer, said Friday.

Last Tuesday, commissioners appointed Deputy Treasurer Shelly Flemetis to serve as acting treasurer while Goodin applied for the bond through several companies.

Goodin won’t technically be treasurer until the commissioners revoke that appointment and are satisfied by what she presents at Tuesday’s meeting, Harrison said.

Under state law, every county official is required to obtain a bond and record it with the County Clerk’s office before they assume office on New Year’s Day. The bond is paid for by the county.

The bonds are in place so that if an elected official uses county funds “inappropriately,” such as stealing funds, the county is covered for the amount of the bond, Harrison said.

Goodin said a bonding company backed out last week after it found out about the property taxes.

She wouldn’t say how much she owes to Pacific County. Ironically, the county Treasurer is in charge of collecting taxes.

She said the issue came up at a campaign forum last fall and she promised to “create a plan” to pay the back taxes.

“Owing property taxes came back to haunt me,” Goodin said. “It’s a good lesson learned. I’m a good example for the public that you need to pay property taxes on time, whatever it takes.”

The county appointed Flemetis as a safeguard against lawsuits that could have arisen over decisions Goodin made while her authority was in question, said David Burke, the Pacific County prosecuting attorney.

“Our safest bet was to appoint an acting official, so someone has the authority to act and there won’t be a question of Renee’s status,” Burke said. “We’re trying to make sure we are in the clear.”

Burke and Harrison both said they’ve never heard of a similar situation in Washington state.

If Goodin had not obtained a bond by Tuesday’s meeting, the commissioners would have had the option of either giving her more time to find one or to declare the office vacant and go through the normal appointment process, Harrison said.
Copyright © 2007 The Daily World.

[NI1178] A little about me...
since you're either interested
or extremely bored.



I am the oldest of three children (Traci, my sister is #2 and my brother, Steve, is
#3) born on December 5, 1968 to a German/Irish-American family from Illinois.
I was born in Elgin, Illinois, but moved to a small town called Millington (a teeny
little armpit of a town about 40 miles south of Aurora) when I was but a wee lad.
My childhood was...well, considering I didn't grow up to be a mass murderer or
anything like that...pretty good, I guess. I wouldn't say I was much of a problem
child, although, I'm sure my parents would disagree about certain occasions.

I was an average student in school. I wasn't a scholar or a jock, so I didn't really
have a "niche". Aside from being the "class clown" during the first few grades, I
didn't really have any redeeming qualities. I just did what I had to do to get
through it all. Although, I did manage to pull "B's" most of the time, I did bring
home the occasional "A" as well as a "D", or two. It wasn't until high school that
I started to enjoy school a bit. I was in the school marching and concert bands
for my freshman and sophomore years, which kept me pretty busy. At the end of
my sophomore year I got my first job at a local grocery store (and later a local
hardware store) and had to quit the band. My junior year, I took a Drafting and
Design class at Indian Valley Vocational Center (IVVC) under the expert tutelage
of Mr. Mark Schwendau. Of all the teachers I'd had, he was the one to impact me
the most. He has a great talent for teaching and preparing a young person for life
after graduation. I was also privileged to be in a class with some very intelligent
and talented people, some of which have gone on to be very successful. We were
fortunate enough to attend a drafting competition at Illinois Valley Community
College (IVCC), in which many of us, myself included, placed ( I took second in
the Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CAD)). Toward the end of my junior
year, my parents were divorced and I had to take over the roll as "man of the
house" which forced me to grow up sooner than I had planned. My mother was
eventually remarried to a wonderful man that treats her like she deserves.

Just after graduation, I signed recruitment papers and entered the United States
Air Force in October 1987. In February 1988, after technical training, I got
married and proceeded on to my first assignment in Athens, Greece. I was in
Athens for three years. Looking back on it all, I really enjoyed being there. The
beaches were great, the community was wonderful, and I met some friends I will
have forever.





In December 1990, as Hellenikon Air Base was
closing, I was reassigned to Wüschheim Air Station,
Germany. There, I worked for the 602d Air Control
Squadron, a mobile tactical radar unit. This was a
great assignment that gave me the opportunity to
experience deployments. Our only two deployments
were to Korbeke, in Northern Germany, and Izmir,
Turkey. This assignment was a lot of hard work, but
it was my favorite. It was during this assignment
that, after four years, my wife and I divorced.



After Wüschheim was closed in 1993 (do you see a pattern forming here?), I
moved to Ramstein Air Base, Germany and an assignment to the Personnel
Programs Division, Directorate of Personnel, United States Air Forces in Europe
(HQ USAFE/DP) holding many different jobs with them over the past five years. I
am still working there as NCOIC, Information Management, Force Management
Branch. Shortly after I arrived here, I married my long, long time friend Lori in
July 1993. Not only did I have the pleasure of being married to this wonderful
person, but I also have the distinct privilege of being called "Daddy" by her
beautiful little girl, and my step-daughter, Stephanie.






My Interests
(not in any particular
order)

Bowling
Computers
Learning (pretty much anything)
Driving (especially fast, since I live in Germany and
can)
Golf



What I Like

Facts
Punctuality
Intelligence



What I Don't Like

People who are always late
People who don't try before asking for help
Hot weather (above 70º)
There's more, but my space on the server is limited.

[NI1220] Bernard, King of Italy


Born: c799
Died: 818

Father: Pepin, King Italy
Mother: ?

Married (1): ?
Children: ?

King of Italy 813-817

Bernard was crowned King of Italy by Charlemagne, his grandfather, whe Louis the Pious was made co-Emperor in 813. When Charlemagne died the next year, Louis became Emperor. In 817, right after Lothar was made
co-Emperor, Bernard revolted but surrenedered before Louis's army. He was sentenced to death, but was spared
and only blinded. The next year he died of these wounds.

[NI1223] Louis II, the German, Eastern Frankish King


Born: c805
Died: 876

Father: Louis I, the Pious, Frankish Emperor
Mother: Irmengard

Married (1): Emma of Bavaria
Children:
Carloman, King of Bavaria
Louis the Younger, King of Saxony
Charles III, the Fat, Frankish Emperor

King of Bavaria 817-843
Eastern Frankish King 843-876

Louis the Pious became Frankish Emperor in 814 with no rivals to the throne. He had three sons, Lothar,
Pepin, and Louis. In 817, Lothar was made co-Emperor with his father and King of Italy to replace Bernard,
Pepin made King of Aquitaine, and Louis made King of Bavaria. In 823, Louis had another son, Charles, this
one by a new wife (the mother of the 3 brothers had died). Louis tried desperately to work Charles in as a
successor, but the three brothers fought him everytime he tried to reform his will. After much conflict,
Emperor Louis dropped Lothar's imperial title in 829 and sent him off to Italy. The next year the brothers
attacked, reinstated Lothar with his imperial title, and had Judith, the mother of Charles, sent off to a
nunnery. By 831, Louis had regained his power, brought back his wife, and again dropped Lothar's titles, this
time all of them, and refused him to return to court ever again without permission. That year Pepin revolted.
In 832, Louis of Bavaria joined Pepin, and the Emperor Louis declaired Pepin deposed of all royal titles but he
had no power to enforce this declairation, so Pepin continued to rule. In 833, the three again attacked with
support from Louis's own generals and from Pope Gregory IV himself. They imprisoned their father and
brother, and exiled Judith to Italy under watch of Lothar, and Louis and Pepin gained territory. The next year,
however, Louis and Pepin released their father and brother, brought back his wife, and peace was made. In
835, Louis was re-crowned Emperor with great pomp. Pepin died in 838, and while Louis tried to have Charles
crowned king in Aquitaine, the nobles crowned Pepin's son Pepin II. Neither had the authority to rule in the
country. In 840, Louis the Pious died, and the three surviving brothers began a civil war for the division of the
Empire.

In 841, Charles and Louis of Bavaria ganged up on their brother Lothar, who had the support of Pepin II, who
were defeated at Fontenay, France. In 842, Charles and Louis made a formal alliegance, and together put
down a Saxon revolt that year and a revolt in Aquitaine under Pepin II. In 843, the Treaty of Verdun was
made between the three brothers, by which Charles would rule the Western Frankish Kingdom (France), with
Pepin's Aquitaine a subkindom under the ultimate authority of Charles, Lothar would rule the Middle Frankish
Kingdom (Italy, Provence, and Lorraine) with the imperial title, and Louis would rule the Eastern Frankish
Kingdom (Germany).

In 858/9, Louis invaded the Western Frankish Kingdom, seeing how weak Charles was, on the invite of the
Burgundians and Pepin II of Aquitaine. Charles couldn't raise an army for defense he was so unpopular with
his nobles and his people. Louis called a synod of bishops, hoping that the clergy would hand over the crown
to him. However, Hincmar, Archbishop of Reims, stayed loyal to Charles and rallied the Church against Louis.
In 860, Louis pulled out of France with a much damaged reputation, but peace was made through Lothar II of
Lotharingia, his nephew. That year also Lothar wished to divorce his childless wife and marry one Waldrada.
The Church was very much against the divorce, and a bitter argument ensued with Lothar and Louis on one
side, and Charles, Lothar's current wife, and Pope Nicholas I on the other. In 862, Lothar won the fight and
got his new wife. The Pope sent envoys to Lothar, but they were no use, and Louis even marched on Rome
before Lothar finally gave in. When Lothar died in 638, Louis and Charles divided up the kingdom (they had
done the same when Charles of Provence died in 863). Louis died in 876.

[NI1224] Charles III, the Fat, Frankish Emperor


as Charles II, the Fat, Western Frankish King (France)

Born: 839
Died: January 888

Father: Louis II, the German, Eastern Frankish King
Mother: Emma of Bavaria

Married (1): ?
Children: ?

King of Swabia 876-882
King of Italy 879-884
Eastern Frankish King 882-887
Frankish Emperor 881-887
Western Frankish King 884-887

When Louis the German died in 876, his three sons succeeded to the Eastern Frankish Kingdom: Carloman to
Bavaria, Louis the Younger to Saxony, and Charles the Fat to Swabia. When Carloman died in 880, Bavaria
passed to his brothers. When Louis died two years later, Charles became the sole Eastern Frankish King. In
879, Pope John VIII invited Charles to Rome, asking him to defeat the invading Saracens. Charles arrived,
received the Italian crown, and left without providing any help. John was in desperate need of help, so two
years later he invited Charles again, this time offering the Imperial crown. Again, Charles arrived, took the
crown, and left without lending aid to Rome. In 882, King Charles the Fat and Kings Louis III and Carloman of
France defeated Duke Boso of Provence, who had recently placed himself on the throne of Aquitaine, and
Charles got a share of the lands. Carloman of France died in 884, and Charles was made King Charles II of
that country, although Duke Hugh was the actual ruler. He also lost Italy that year to Duke Guido of Spoleto.
In 885, Charles failed to stop a Danish invasion that pushed all of the way to Paris, where Count Eudes was
forced to fight for himself. Charles came to give aid, which was bribing them to leave and go to Burgundy,
which greatly upseted the people. Hugh died that year as well, and since Charles knew that he wasn't strong
enough to do the job, he elevated Eudes to the position of Duke in his place. In 887, Charles was finally
deposed, and in January of the next year he died. He was succeeded in France by Eudes and in Germany by
his loved son Arnulf (illeg.), Guido ruled Italy, Louis III ruled Provence, and Raoul of Burgundy ruled
Lotharingia.

[NI1228] Charles III, the Simple, Western Frankish King


Born: 879
Died: 929

Father: Louis II, the Stammerer, Western Frankish King
Mother: Adelaide

Married (1): Eadgifu
Children:
Louis IV, d'Outremer, Western Frankish King

Western Frankish King 893-923

Charles III succeeded Eudes as king of France in 893. In 911, he was forced to cede Normandy to the Norse
leader Duke Robert I. In 923, Charles was imprisoned by his chief nobles, most notably Duke Rudolph of
Burgundy (later king of France). Rudolph succeeded as king. Charles died in prison in 929.

[NI1243] Born: 1163, Pamplona
Acceded: 12 MAY 1191, Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus
Died: AFT 1230, L'Epau Abbey, Near le Mans, Anjou
Interred: Le Mans Cathedral, Le Mans, Anjou
Notes:

After the death of King Richard she fixed her residence
at Mans, in Orleannois, and passed her latter years in pious retirement within
the walls of the Abbey of L'Espan, which she had founded.
Some sources say she was born after 1170.
It is said that she never visited England, but this is untrue.

Father: , Sancho VI the wise of Navarre, King of Navarre, b. AFT 1132

Mother: , Sancha (Beatrice) of Castile

Married 12 MAY 1191, Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus to , Richard I Coeur de Lion, King of EnglandBerengaria of Navarre


Born: 1163, Pamplona
Acceded: 12 MAY 1191, Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus
Died: AFT 1230, L'Epau Abbey, Near le Mans, Anjou
Interred: Le Mans Cathedral, Le Mans, Anjou
Notes:

After the death of King Richard she fixed her residence
at Mans, in Orleannois, and passed her latter years in pious retirement within
the walls of the Abbey of L'Espan, which she had founded.
Some sources say she was born after 1170.
It is said that she never visited England, but this is untrue.

Father: , Sancho VI the wise of Navarre, King of Navarre, b. AFT 1132

Mother: , Sancha (Beatrice) of Castile

Married 12 MAY 1191, Chapel of St George, Limasol, Cyprus to , Richard I Coeur de Lion, King of England

[NI1247] Marie A. Knott of Hillsboro, Ohio, a fifth great granddaughter of John Swadner, a sixth cousin to me, has provided a copy of a hand written legal document to which the ownership of a Richard, a boy negro slave, is transferred from Philip Ebbert, husband of Mary Swadner (daughter of John Swadner) to their daughter Catherine. Catherine, at the time (1826) is married to a Daniel Baumgardner.

Marlene and I spent some the better part of an evening trying to transcribe the hand written document, below is the results of our labors. Words that we could not make out are listed as (blank) and the transcription is, hopefully, correct.

John Swadner arrived in Libertytown, Maryland in 1754, purchased several pieces of property which included indentured servants and most likely more than one slave. So, it would appear that our ancestors were Slave owners, which would have been a common practice during this period of America history.

The Indenture Document

This Indenture made this first --- day of June, in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred (and) twentysix, between Philip Ebbert of Frederick County & State of Maryland of the one part and Catherine Baumgardner, daughter of the said Philip Ebbert, of the county & State Afores of the other part, Witnesseth that the said Philip Ebbert as well for and in consideration of the natural love and affection which he the said Philip Ebbert hath and beareth unto the said Catherine Baumgardner, as also for the better maintainence, support, livelihood and preferment of the said Catherine Baumgardner, hath given, granted, alined, enfeoffed and enfirmed and by these presents doth give, grant, allow, enfeoff, and confirm unto the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigned, that negro boy named Richard for term of years, being the same boy, Richard purchased by the said Philip Ebbert for a term of years, and willed by a certain Brico Burgefs to be free after serving such term, as referenced to the said will. Will more fully show, together (blank) all the advantaged emoluments, services and profits of the said boy Richard for such term of years as may or is specified or set forth in the will of the said Brico Burgefs aforesaid, and all the right, title, interest, claim, and demand whatsoever of him the said Philip Ebbert of in and to the said boy Richard. To have and to hold the said boy Richard for such time as specified and set forth in the said will of aforesaid and hereby granted and confirmed or mentioned intended so to be unto the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigned for the only proper use and benefit and behoof of her the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigns for such time as stated in the will of aforesaid; and the said Philip Ebbert for himself, his heirs, ancestors and administrators doth covenant, grant and agree to bind with the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigns by these presents, that she the said Catherine Baumgardner her heirs and afsigns shall and fully may, from time to time, and at all times hereafter, peaceably and quietly (blank), hold, use, occupy, and pofsefs the said negro boy Richard, for such term as (blank), hereby granted and confirmed, or mentioned or intended to be hereby granted or confirmed, free, clear, and fully discharged, or well and sufficiently saved, kept (blank) and indemnified, of, from, and against, all former and other, gifts, grants, gains, sales, jointures, feoffments, dowers, estates, entails, rents, rent charges, arrears of rents, judgements, esceautions, and of, from and against, all former and other (blank), troubles, charges and incumbrances whatsoever, had done or suffered, or had, made, done or suffered by him the said Philip Ebbert his heirs or afsigns (blank) other person or persons, lawfully claiming or to claim, by, from, or under him, (blank) or any of them. -

In Witnefs whereof the said Philip Ebbert has hereunto hand and affessed his Seal this day of year above written.

Seal of and delivered in person of Jos. Penn- Abdiel Unhefer Philip Ebbert
(Signature of)

State of Maryland Fred. County to whit

On June 1st, 1826 before us the subscribers two Justices of the Peace for the County Personnally appears Philip Ebbert the within named, and acknowleged the within instruments of writing to be his act and deed, according to the perfect true interest and meaning thereof, and the act of apembly in such case in accordance provided.

Acknowledged before, Jos. Penn (signature) and Abdiel Unhefer (signature)

[NI1250] Ruled from 1377 to 1399

[NI1254] Chalpaida


Born: ?
Died: ?

Father: ?
Mother: ?

Married (1): Pepin II, of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Children:
Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Hildebrand

Chalpaida was the wife of Mayor Pepin II that bore him Charles Martel.

[NI1255] Carloman, King of the Franks


Born: c751
Died: December 771

Father: Pepin III, the Short, King of the Franks
Mother: Bertrada of Laon

Married (1): Gerberge
Children:
several sons

King of the Franks 768-771

When Pepin III died in 768, his sons Carloman and Charles I (called Charlemagne towards the end of his
reign) succeeded as Kings of the Franks. Carloman received the strong interior - Paris and Orleans, and
Charlemagne received the rebellious states and border lands in a NW crescent around Carloman's kingdom.
Either Pepin did this because he favored Carloman, or because he knew that Charlemagne was a better
general and needed to be the one to face the rebellions.

In 769, Aquitaine rebelled and both brothers went to face the problem. Carloman marched back home without
striking a blow, leaving Charlemagne to subdue Aquitaine on his own, which he did. The hatred between the
brothers was temporarily settled by their mother, Bertrada. The Lombards were making many threats to Pope
Hadrian, and so he called for the Frankish kings for protection. Carloman was pro-Lombard, so Charlemagne
was again on his own. In 771, the Lombard king Desiderius invaded Rome and took much Papal land. At the
end of that year, Carloman died, leaving Charlemagne the entire Frankish kingdom.

[NI1263] Born: 25 MAR 1133, Le Mans, Anjou
Acceded: 19 DEC 1154, Westminster Abbey, London, England
Died: 6 JUL 1189, Chinon Castle, France
Interred: Fontevraud Abbey, France
Notes:

Reigned 1154-1189. He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the
Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own
family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and
his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions
until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which
increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of
great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy.

Father: Plantagenet, Geoffrey V the Fair, Count of Anjou and Maine, b. 24 AUG 1113

Mother: , Matilda the Empress, Queen of England, b. ABT 1103/04

Married 18 MAY 1152, Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, France to , Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess of Aquitaine

Child 1: , William, Count of Poitiers, b. 17 AUG 1152
Child 2: , Henry the Young King, King of England, b. 28 FEB 1155
Child 3: , Matilda (Maud), b. JUN 1156
Child 4: , Richard I Coeur de Lion, King of England, b. 8 SEP 1157
Child 5: Plantagenet, Geoffrey II of Bretagne, Duke of Brittany, b. 23 SEP 1158
Child 6: Plantagenet, Eleanor, b. 13 OCT 1162
Child 7: Plantagenet, Joan, b. OCT 1165
Child 8: , John I Lackland, King of England, b. 24 DEC 1167

Associated with Clifford, Rosamund (Joan)

Child 9: Plantagenet, Geoffrey, Archbishop of York, b. ABT 1159
Child 10: Longespée, William of Salisbury, Earl of Salisbury, b. AFT 1160
Child 11: , Peter

Associated with Capet, Alisa

Child 12: , daughter
Child 13: , three children

Associated with Bloet, Nesta

Child 14: , Morgan of Beverley, Provost of Beverley

Associated with de Porhoët, Alice

Child 15: , child, b. ABT 1168
Child 16: , Matilda of Barking, Abbess of Barking
Child 17: , Hugh of Wells, Bishop of Lincoln
Child 18: , Richard

[NI1276] Death occurred during the birth of a child (1923) (age 23) as a reults of a blood clot from the child birth. This information was obtained from a life insurance application by Lawrence Hamilton with Northern Life Insurance Company of Seattle dated September 28, 1948 in Raymond, Washington. There is no indication if the child lived or died. Another mystery!!!

[NI1289] David Swaidner (per his tombstone) born May 1, 1797. He died May 28, 1880. Buried at North Georgetown Cemetery, Columbiana Co. Ohio Row 11.

From History of the Townships and Villages of Columbiana County (Ohio): "David Swadner, from Frederick County, Maryland, settled in 1815 on the southwest quarter of the section. At this time there was no road from Salem to New Garden.

This township lies upon the north border of the county, west of the centre, and is township 16, in the fourth range. It is bounded on the north by Goshen and Perry townships, on the east by Salem and Perry, on the south by Hanover, on the west by Knox, and contains an area of thirty-two square miles. Its surface is mostly hilly upland, covered with fertile farms and dotted with woodlands, which still retain much of their primitive wildness. The soil is chiefly a sandy loam, and is well adapted to the raising of grain and small fuits, to the latter of which much attention is given. The principal streams in the westen part of the township are tributaries of the Mahoning. One branch rises in the north part of the township and flows southwesterly through the valley to the west line of the township; another rises near the middle of the township's south line, in the lower range of sections and flows northwesterly, uniting with the first-named branch at the west line of the township on section 19.

A branch of the west fork of Little Beaver Creek rises on section 22, in the eastern portion of the township, flows a little east of south through Winona, and passes out of the township one and a quarter miles west of the southeast corner.

Cold Run rises near the south line of Perry township, flows southerly, and leaves the township a short distance north of the southeast corner.

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History of Townships and Villages of Columbia County, Ohio

Butler Township

This township lives upon the North border of the county, west of the centre, and is townships 16, in the fourth range. It is bounded on the North by Goshen and Perry townships, on the East by Salem and Perry, on the South by Hanover, on the west by Knox, and contains an area of 32 square miles. Its surface is mostly hilly upland, covered with fertile farms and dotted with woodlands, which still retain much of their primitive Wildness. The soil is chiefly a sandy loam, and is well adapted in raising of grain and small fruits, to the latter of which much attention is given. The principal streams in the western part of the township are tributaries of the Mahoning. One branch rises in North part of the township and flows southwesterly through the valley to the west line of the township; another rises near the middle of the townships south line, in the lower range of sections, and flows northwesterly, uniting with the first-named branch at the west line of the township, on section 19.

A branch of the west fork of Little Beaver Creek rises on section 22, in the eastern portion of the township, flows a little east of south through Winona, and passes out of the township one and a quarter miles west of the southeast corner.

Cold Run rises near the South line of Perry Township, flows southerly, and leaves the township a short distance north of the southeast corner.

Early Settlements.

William Whinnery entered section 27 in 1800 or 1801, and settle with his family on the southwest quarter in 1806. He had sons, -- Robert, John, Thomas, James, William, and Zimri. John, then a single man, came in advance of the family, and having no means for baking, traveled four miles to the house of the nearest neighbor, John Schooley, were his loaves were baked.

Mr. Whinnery divided the section among his sons, giving Robert, the eldest, the southeast quarter, where Hannah Whinnery now resides; to John, the Northeast quarter, with David, son of Robert, now lives; to Thomas the northwest corner, where the family of S. H. Bennett resides; to Zimri, the youngest, the southwest corner, which constituted the homestead. The father and mother, William and Abigail Whinnery resided with their sons Zimri while they lived. Martha Whinnery, the widow of the son of Robert, now resides the homestead. James received from his father of the southwest corner of section 31, in the southwest corner of the township. Dr. J. C. Whinnery son of James and father of Miss Abbey Whinnery, the well-known vocalist, resides in Salem. James, another son, is a short distance west from Salem. William settled upon the northwest corner of section 32 where his son resides.

Sampson King settled on the southwest quarter of section 31; George Mountz, who married Catharine Wolf, on the Northeast quarter, which was afterwards divided into three parts and sold; Richard Beck bought the southwest quarter, where Alvin Beck afterward lived.


After the year in 1810, William Galbreith entered the north half of section 29. It was divided between the two sons, Thomas and Samuel, and is still owned by them. Peter Ward bought the South half of the section.

John Martin entered the southeast quarter of section 21. Hugh Martin settled on the east half of the Northeast quarter. John and George Bricker entered part of section 22 in 1814.

David Swaidner, from Frederick County, Maryland. Settled in 1815 on the southwest quarter of the section. At this time it was no road from Salem to New Garden.

In the year in 1803, David Burson and John Johnson, brothers-in-law, entered section 26. James Hoopes, in 1818, purchased several 88-acre lots and, with his wife and children -- Joseph, Thomas, and Daniel, -- settled in the southeast quarter of the section. Several of his children are living in this part of the town. Robert, a son, lives on the old homestead; William, on section 35; Thomas, on section 23; Daniel, on section 25; James, on section 28. John Johnson chose the Northeast quarter of section 26, where his son Edwin resides. Mr. Johnson was a prominent member of the Society of Friends.

James and William Randels came from New York County, PA in 1806. James settled on the southeast quarter of section 25. He had three sons. His daughter, Maria, married Samuel Test a descendant of Samuel Test, an early settler. William Randels, with his wife and eight children, moved…..
(end of page 96).

Page 97 missing.

Continued Page 98.

Moses Votaw settled in the same section, in what has since been known as the "Votaw neighborhood". He was a brother to Isaac Votaw, who settled in Goshen Township the same year. His sons, Moses and Aaron, are living at Winona.

William Hereford and John Coppock entered section 35 in 1803. Coppock moved to Mount Pleasant in 1802, and to Butler in 1804, and settled on the north half of the section; Hereford on the South half, which in 1810, he sold to Joseph Ingram, whose son Joseph lives on a part of the farm. Joshua Coppock, son of John, lives on a part of the old farm. Jeremiah, another son, lives one mile west of Winona.

Abram Warrington, a nephew of a Abram Warrington who lived in Salem; came from New Jersey in 1805, lived with his uncle a short time, and then journeyed to Damascus, stopping the first night with Samuel Morris, who lived on the north east quarter of section 5 and has been there about a year. Mr. Morris was killed by falling from a tree while hunting a coon in the spring of 1806. Abram Warrington bought the Morris Place. He married Keziah Woolman, a sister of Samuel, Aaron, and Abner on Christmas day, 1806 in the Friends meeting house at Damascus. Theirs was the first marriage in settlement, and their descendants are living on the farm.

Samuel Woolman and his brother Aaron and sister Keziah came from New Jersey in November 1805. Samuel settled on the northwest quarter of section 5; Aaron on the SouthEast quarter of section 5, taking up 80 acres. Abner Woolman, brother of Samuel, came in 1816, and settled on the southwest quarter of the same section. This land was divided between his daughters, Sarah and Mary. Sarah married John H. Stanley, and resides on the farm. Mary married Jonathan Crew.

Joshua Lynch and Jesse Walton came in 1805, and settled on the northwest quarter of section 8. Mr. Lynch was one of the first school teachers at Damascus, and also one of the preachers in the Society of Friends. His son lives at Damascus and owns the homestead.

Obadiah crew came from near Richmond VA, in 1805, in settled in the township of Knox, where he lived many years. About 1820 he bought the mill property of John Emrich, about two miles south of Damascus, on section 17. His son, John married Marjorie Ellison and settled on the southwest quarter of section 19 in Goshen. James T. Crew, lawyer and justice of the peace in Butler Township, is a descendant of Obadiah. Jonathan, another son of Obadiah, settled on the north half of section 20. He son, Joshua, had a part of the section, which he sold to Peter Kissinger, from whom it passed to Aquilla Binford and Jeremiah Ruble. The North half of the southwest corner was sold to Daniel Andrews, whose wife was a daughter of Marian, who was a sister of Joshua crew. This South half of that quarter was sold to Samuel Galbraith.

The South half of the section was taken up by Jacob Shriver, who built thereon a distillery. His son, George and the family of John, another son, are living on the place.

Peter Ritchie bought the South part of the Northeast quarter of section 20, which was afterwards sold to William Goldberg.

David Swaidner entered the Northeast quarter of section 22 in 1815, and in 1824 moved to the Northeast quarter of section 20, where he now resides. (Editor's Note: As of 1826)

Joshua Stanley, the brother of Jonathan, who settled in what is now Perry Township, was from Virginia, and came to the township in 1805, locating on the Northeast quarter of section 10, where J. R. Beaumont now lives. Three sons are living in the township, -- Oberton and Frederick in the southeastern portion, and John H. near Damascus. Moses Stanley, another brother of Jonathan, settled on the southeast quarter of section 10. John Stanley Jr. who erected a woolen-mill in Salem was a son of Moses.

Richard Carle, father of Joseph Carle, settled on the southeast quarter of section 10, and part of the Northeast quarter of section 15. James Whitaker settled on the Northeast quarter of section 10.

Caleb Kirk entered section 20 in 1805, and retained it until 1824, when he sold a portion of the west half to Benjamin Windle and Edwin M. Windle (grandson of Benjamin) now resides.

William Kennettt, with his wife came from Maryland in 1810, and bought 80 acres of land in the northwest quarter of section 28. His daughter married Aaron Votaw and now lives in Winona.

James French, son of Thomas French and brother of Robert, Brazilla, and Thomas, settled on section 4 in 1819, on land now owned by Dr. S. F. Bellinger. He had six sons and one daughter, -- William, Thomas, Ann, Robert, James, Charles, and Richard. He died at the age of 71 years in 1844. Mrs. Daniel Straughn, of Goshen, is a granddaughter.

Daniel Burns and to the west half of the Northeast quarter of section 15, receiving his deed from government April 15th 1822. The Northeast quarter was sold to Jacob Johnson and afterwards passed by deed to Henry Mall, and from him to Robert Patterson. Andrew Stanley, Henry Sheets, Henry Mall, and -- Coppock were mentioned in his deed as owning the property adjoining.

Henry Mall owned the East half of the southwest quarter where John Hanna now lives, 1879; Henry Sheets, the west half of the southeast quarter, were Robert Hanna lives; David Stratton, the East half of the South East quarter, where John Heckler lives.

Henry Mall and Henry Sheets sold to Robert Patterson, who gave the land to his daughters, who married John and Robert Hanna. David Stratton gave his land to his daughter, Mrs. Martin Burns. The land was afterward purchased by Alex Russell, who sold to Robert Patterson, who sold to his son-in-law John Heckler. John Martin bought 80 acres of the East half of the southwest quarter, which is still in possession of the family.

Section 16

Section 16 set apart for purposes of education. The first act of the state legislature authorizing the sale of section 16 was passed in 1827, and required a petition and favorable vote of the people. (Editor's Note: end of page 98)

Page 101

The meetinghouse was built in 1839 and opened in January 1840. In 1854 when the separation occurred among Friends throughout the country, this society also felt it's disturbing influence, and the Gurneyites and Wilburites became distinct organizations. They worship in the same meeting house but it different hours. The Gurneyites numbered about 70, and the Wilburites 270.

About 1870 there were six distinct societies of Friends at Winona and Salem, each claiming to hold to the original faith, -- Hicksites, Gurneyites, Wilbutites, Kollitres, Dr. Kite's meeting, and the Remnants.

Methodist Episcopal Church

Meetings had been held several years before the organization of this church at the house of Lewis Jobes. Mr. -- Wells preached occasionally, and at other times the society was served by ministers from Salem.

About 1855 meetings were held in the school house at Damascus, and a class organized with Philip Barker and wife, Mrs. Nancy Little, Miss Elizabeth Little, John Kerr and wife, Clement Kerr and wife, and James Kerr and wife as members. Rev. Mr. Eaton was the first pastor who was succeeded by Revs. Kineer, Storer, Williams, Jackson, McCarthy, Brown, J. M. Brady, A. J. Lange, George Crook, G. W. Anderson, the present pastor. An edifice was erected in 1857, and in 1871 was repaired at cost of eight hundred dollars. They have about 80 member is and Sunday school of 60 pupils, of which Dr. S. F. Bellinger is superintendent.

Burying grounds

The burying grounds that Damascus, situated near the meetinghouse of the friends, was the first in the township. Henry Woolf presented five acres of land for burial purposes, situated on the northwest quarter of section 30. No burial has taken place within this cemetery for a number of years, but within its quiet enclosure many of "the rude forefathers of the Hamlet sleep".

Township house

A township house was first built in Butler about 1842, on the school house lock, near the center of the town, and half a mile south of Middleton. It was built in connection with the schoolhouse of the district, a partition only separating the two. In 1876 a lot was purchased adjoining the first site on the North, and a substantial brick edifice, 16 but 24 feet in size, erected thereon.

[NI1330] Marine Corps Selects David James Flemetis for Warrant Officer 1

Regular and Reserve Selection Result
RAAUZYUW RUEACMC 1791930-UUUU--RUEASUU.
ZNR UUUUU
R 081000Z OCT 99 ZYB
FM
CMC WASHINGTON DC//MCRC//
TO MARADMIN
BT
UNCLAS
//N01040//
MARADMIN
MSGID/GENADMIN/MCRC OE//
SUBJ/MCBUL 1040. FY 2000 ENLISTED TO WARRANT OFFICER (REGULAR AND /RESERVE) SELECTION BOARD RESULTS//
REF/A/RMG/MCRC OE/YMD:981223//
REF/B/RMG/MCRC OE/YMD:981224//
REF/C/DOC/CMC
MPP-35/YMD:911126//
NARR/REF A IS MCBUL 1040 OF 23 DEC 98 (MARADMIN 179-98) WHICH ANNOUNCED THE FY 2000 ENLISTED TO WARRANT OFFICER (REGULAR) SELECTION BOARD. REF B IS MCBUL 1040 OF 24 DEC 98 (MARADMIN 180-98) WHICH ANNOUNCED THE SELECTION
BOARD AND SITE VACANCIES FOR THE SMCR WO PROGRAM. REF C IS SECNAVINST 1120.11A WHICH GOVERNS THE PROCUREMENT
OF THE LDO AND WO PROGRAMS.// POC/MRS SHAPIRO/GS11/-/-/TEL:DSN 278-9442/TEL:(703) 784-9442// RMKS/1. PER THE REFS, THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY APPROVED THE FY 2000 ENLISTED TO WARRANT OFFICER (REGULAR AND RESERVE) SELECTION
BOARD REPORT. THE BELOW-NAMED PERSONNEL HAVE BEEN SELECTED FOR APPOINTMENT TO PERMANENT WARRANT OFFICER (WO1): WARRANT OFFICER (REGULAR) SELECTIONS


NAME SSN SMOS MCC RUC

FLEMETIS, DAVID J 9847 2120 J97 54062

As of April 25, 2003 assigned to: USMC
H&S company
3rd LAR BN (Armory)
UIC 39850
FPO AP96426-9850


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from The Pacific County Press, April 28, 2004, page 10

CWO2 David Flemetis is presently stationed with the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, 7th Regiment, somewhere in Iraq.

Flemetis, the son of Jeanie Rae and Randy Flemetis of Raymond, has been in the Marine Corps for 18 years and served two years in the Reserves prior to that.

This is his third trip to Iraq. He was there during Desert Strom and went back in February of 2003. During that deployment, he was 39 days in a Humvee without respite! He was deployed again in February 2004.

As a Reginmentaql Ordinance Officer, Flemetis is with a head-quarters unit and is in charge of ordinance for three battallions.

His wife Hayley and their four children----Nathaneil, 14, Hannah, 12, Abigail, 4, and one year old Sadie resides at his main base in 29 Palms, California. Photo courtesy of Randy Flemetis. Editor's note. David's Grandfather Geroge Flemetis, who served during WWII would have been very proud of his grandson.

[NI1332] Copied from Elizabeth's web site

About Me
My full name is Elizabeth Kelley Flemetis, but you dont have to call me that, people usually just call me Liz. I am 14 years old and my birthday is on July 25th. I am also a leo, and a dragon in the chinese zodiac. The main thing I love to do is cheerleading, I would eat, sleep, and breathe it if I could! I cheer for Raymond High School football, girls b-ball, and boys b-ball, and now I'm on a compitition team. If ya dont know what that is , its where you go to big places, compete against other squads, and try and get a bigger trophy than anyone else! Anyways, I also did track but I quit half way through the season because I suck! I have a lot of favorite things but here are a few... Color- green, Food- mac and cheese, Holiday- 4th of July, Finger- pinky, Movie- I like 'em all, Music- I like any type of music except blues. And heres alot of random facts ya might wanna know about me. Well I sleep on my back and I take up a lot of space, I don't bite my nails or have any discusting habbits like that, when I graduate from high school I want to be a mail lady, I'm going to name my kid Addison, all three of my brothers are probably older then your parents, and I like my eggs scrambled! I could think of way more but ya would never want to hear it all!

[NI1362] Copied from a newspaper clippings found in the personal effects of Leora E. Hamilton after her death in September, 2000. This is one of hundreds of newspaper clippings that Leora kept on family members and relatives.

Announcements: Anniversaries, Cabe

The children of Robert [Bob] and Edith Cabe will host a reception at the Baw Faw Grange Hall on July 14 from 1 to 3 PM, in honor of the couple's 50th wedding anniversary.

Their son and daughter and their spouses are Larry and Gail Dean of Chehalis and Everett and Patty Voie of Winlock. There are five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Cabe and Edith Lininger were married on July 18, 1941 in Adna. They settled at Bunker Creek for two years before moving to a dairy farm in the Boistfort Valley in 1943 and to their present farm in Curtis in 1948.

The milk cows for many years and now are in partnership with her grandson, Bob Stevens, raising replacement heifers. They also raise peas and corn for local processing.

Bob was a Lewis County Road supervisor for 17 years, a supervisor for Lewis County Soil and Water Conservation District for 25 years, and an area director of the Southwest Washington Soil and Water Conservation District for two years. He also served on the ASCS committee and the Boistfort School Board for six years, and was a director of the County Board of Education for two years. He retired in 1984.

Cabe is a charter member Boistfort Lions Club and served as District Governor of district 19G in 1968-69. He served on the Boistfort Valley Water Corporation Board.

The Cabe's are lifetime residents of Lewis County, and enjoy spending time at the beach and visiting with family and friends. Both are members of the Baw Faw Grange and the Chehalis Eagles Lodge.

[NI1378] As told by Leora Ethel Peterson-Swadener-Hamilton: Feb 3, 1997

Andrew Asuja and Annie were my great grandparents. Their son Andrew owned The Andrew Bottling Company in Aberdeen before Dennis Company, here (in Raymond), took over the bottleing operation. Their daughter Ida, my grandmother, after grandpa Peterson (Eric Seppinen Peterson) died, married a Setula from the Lincoln Creek area in Lewis County. He had four or five children from a previous marriage. His son Dick stayed on the farm with Grandma (Peterson) until she died and then he (Dick) sold the farm and moved to California. Dick and his brother Curley were the only ones I ever met.

As I recall, the Asuja's farmed a piece of property that was physically located in three counties: Thurston, Grays Harbor, and Lewis. They had to pay property taxes on the property to all three counties. This property was located near, what use to be the small town of Independence, which is located three to four miles SSW of Rochester, Washington, where the boundaries of Thurston, Grays Harbor and Lewis counties meet.

As told by Grace Peterson-Johnson: Feb 6, 1997

There was hard feelings between the Andrew Asuja, his wife Annie and the Peterson Family. Ida, their only daughter, worked for Eric Seppinen Peterson as a housekeeper. In the nature of things, Ida became pregnant with Eric and Ida's oldest child, Elmi. Only at the encourgement of the friends of the family did Eric and Ida marry, apparently, just in time. After the marriage there was very little contact between the two families.

As Researched by Morris G. Swadener Jr.

In a nation-wide search, as of February 7, 1997, there is no recorded evidence of any individuals bearing the name of Asuja, who survived, with the exception of Andrew Asuja Jr. who I have been told was married, but had no children. The Social Security Death Index carries the data as noted on the family group page. Andrew (Sr.) and his wife are said to have died in the same year, 1931, and were buried near, what use to be the small hamlet of Independence, Washington. Independence is located three to four mile SSW of Rochester, Thurston County, Washington at the junction of the three counties of Thurston, Grays Harbor, and Lewis.

Location of the resting place is unknown at this time.

[NI1379] ASUJA, ANNIE SOPHIA -- Born August 6, 1862, Finland. Died Nov. 25, 1945, Rochester, Wash. Cause of death: cerebral hemorrhage. Wife of Andrew Asuja (age 86). Father: Matt Paavola. Mother: Maija Orjander. Burial Nov. 29, 1945, Greenwood Memorial, Centralia, Wash.

Note: Information regarding this individual appears to be related but lacks documentation.
RIVERS, ANNA -- Born January 4, 1908, Independence, Wash. Died Nov. 23, 1927, St. Joseph Hospital, Aberdeen, Wash. Cause of death: lobar pneumonia; tonsillitis. Single. Housemaid. Father: Victor Rivers. Mother: Emily Asuja. Informant: Mrs. Anna Asuja, Independence, Wash. Burial Nov. 27, 1927, Centralia, Wash.

[NI1381] SETULA, JOHN-- Born September 1, 1861, Finland. Died July 29, 1943, Lewis County General Hospital, Centralia, Wash. Cause of death: uremia; acute and chronic prostatitis. Husband of Ida. Farmer. Usual residence Rochester. Father: Jacob Setula. Informant: A.R. Setula, Rochester, Wash. Burial July 31, 1943, Rochester, Wash.

Finn Hill Cemetery, Independence, WA. At the end of Nelson Road Independence Valley. S28 T15N R4W created in 1905 about 2 acres.
Contact Andrea Phelps 325 Nelson Road Rochester WA 98579. Also known as Independence Valley or Finnish Cemetery.

Obituary: Walter J. Setula

A lifetime resident of the Centralia area, Walter J. Setula, 84, died Centralia his home Wednesday, November 1, 1978

He was born Nov. 17, 1893 in Glen Eden, Lincoln Creek, Lewis County, Washington, and was a retired logger and a veteran of World War I. Mr. Setula was a member and past master of Oakville Lodge 181 F. A. M., a member and past worthy matron of Oakville chapter 211, Order of Eastern Star and was past commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Setula was a member of Centralia Chapter 44, Royal Arch Masons, Alpha Council 20, Royal and Select Masters, St. Helens Commandry 12, Knights Templar Afifi Temple Shrine of Tacoma, Lewis County Shrine Club, Judea Shrine 4, order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem, Walter F. Meier Court, Order of Amaranth Oakville American Legion Post 18 and veterans of World War I.

Survivors include his wife, Lillie A., at home; a son, Gene R., San Diego, California; two granddaughters, Karen and Janet Setula, Chicago, Illinois; a brother, A.R. [Dick], Mountain View, California, and numerous nieces and nephews.

Services will be Monday at 2 PM Newell-Hoerling's Chapel, Centralia with the Rev. Harvey C. Hartling officiating. Interment Will Follow at Sunset Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Chehalis. Under the Offices of Oakville Lodge 181 F. and A. M.

[NI1386] From: David Penman
To: Laura Youngberg ; Shelley Rover ; Reichler, Mary ; Stanley A. Pier ; Keith Penman ; Bob & Norma ; Saundra Martin ; Morris G. Swadener Jr. ; Theresa Hawkins ; dbrauer@mts.net ; Terri Adams
Sent: Sunday, May 28, 2006 1:18 PM
Subject: A little news item

Jonathan made the local paper with his winning entry in the Xcel Energy Calendar contest. This was the third time he won a place on the calendar. The link will not be good for more than a few more days, so check it out soon.

Later,

Dave

GF fourth-grader submits winning art
Safety theme makes cover of Xcel calendar
Herald Staff Report

A safety poster by Jonathan Penman, a home-schooled fourth-grader from Grand Forks, was chosen for the cover of a safety calendar that will be published by Xcel Energy, the company announced Monday.

Xcel Energy chose his drawing, along with the artwork of 12 other kindergarten-through-sixth-grade students, to appear in the 27th Annual Xcel Energy Safety Calendar. The company received more than 3,700 art contest entries this year.

Penman's artwork, which will be featured in the month of August, shows children playing near an electrical substation with the safety message: "Near high voltage do not stay. Go find somewhere else to play!" He was rewarded with his framed poster, a $100 savings bond and other prizes.

Late this summer, Xcel Energy will distribute more than 25,000 safety calendars to K-6 teachers throughout the states it serves. More safety tips and other energy information are available at www.xcelenergy.com. The company has headquarters in Minneapolis.

[NI1411] A History of Marlene's Home Town.

Rockaway..."place of waters bright"

History records that in 1609 Henry Hudson and his crew first set eyes on what was to become (in later years) the Rockaway peninsula, when he attempted to enter what he thought was the northern most great river in the area...the body of water that is known today as Jamaica Bay. He had been on a specific mission in search of the northwest passage to the Orient.

Rockaway was then known as Reckowacky, which meant "the place of our own people", a name that literally was interpreted from "neck of the land". It was provided by a small tribe of Canarsie Indians who inhabited this area. The name was given simply to differentiate it from other Indian villages which were all a part of the Mohawk Indian nation. Reckowacky has also been translated to mean "lonely place", or "place of waters bright". (Rockaway, The Playground of New York, Annual yearbook of the Rockaways, June, 1934) By 1639, thirty years after Hudson sailed into Jamaica Bay, the Mohegan tribe of the Mohawk nation sold the greater part of Long Island, including the Rockaway peninsula, to the Dutch. By 1685, after the English took New York over from the Dutch, an agreement was reached between the tribal chieftain, Chief Tackapoucha, and the English governor, to sell off Rockaway to a certain Captain Palmer. Palmer bought Rockaway for 31 pounds sterling.

After ownership disputes between Captain Palmer and the town of Hempstead, in 1687, the land known as Rockaway, was once again sold, this time to Richard-Cornell, an iron master from Flushing. By 1690 Cornell settled in Far Rockaway with his family on a large homestead that he built near what is now known as Central Avenue, overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. When he died in 1694 Cornell was buried in a small family cemetery near his Far Rockaway home. The Cornell Cemetery remains today the only designated New York City landmark in all of Rockaway.

In 1833 the Rockaway Association, a group of wealthy individuals who wanted to develop a fine oceanfront hotel in Rockaway, purchased most of the oceanfront property on the old homestead from descendants of Richard Cornell. The Marine Hotel was erected on the site of the original Cornell home and immediately gained popularity among New York's rich and famous, including such notables as the Vanderbilts, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Washington Irving. The Rockaway Association was also responsible for the construction of the Rockaway turnpike, to guarantee easy access to the hotel. Although the Marine Hotel was completely destroyed by fire in 1864, its success gave way to the erection of many more fine hotels and private residences on the peninsula.

Transportation to and from Rockaway originally consisted of horse-drawn carriages and horses. A ferry took passengers from downtown Manhattan to Brooklyn, and by the mid-1880's, the steam railroad succeeded the stagecoach, terminating at the present Far Rockaway station of the Long Island Railroad. Benjamin Mott deeded to the railroad company a seven acre tract of land to be utilized as a railroad depot. The coming of the railroad to Far Rockaway increased land values and resulted in a boom to the businesses in the area. By 1888, the village of Far Rockaway was large enough to apply for incorporation.

The increasing appeal of the Rockaway area gave rise to an amusement park in Seaside, which attracted families from all over the city. Unfortunately, it was destroyed by the Great Seaside Fire in 1892. It was at that time that The Wave was founded serving as the community newspaper of the entire Rockaway peninsula.

A building boom followed the great fire. The entire section destroyed by the fire was rebuilt and many other places of entertainment and amusements were added, and the area was further developed as a seaside resort...making Rockaway widely regarded as "The Playground of New York".

The Rockaway resort area offered various amusements and rides, including George Tilyou's Amusement park. In 1896, on the Fourth of July, the Seaside Amusement Company officially opened its doors to the public. This park was the future home of Rockaways' Playland. Built in 1901, Playland became world renowned and was the home of the Cinerama coaster, an Olympic size swimming pool, and a million dollar midway. It was eventually bought by the Geist family of Rockaway. Millions enjoyed the long days they spent with family and friends at the beach, followed by a trip to Playland. It lasted until 1985, when it could no longer compete with major regional theme parks being developed all over the country.

On July 1, 1897 the Village of Rockaway Park was incorporated into the City of Greater New York. Streets were graded and sections of Rockaway Park, Belle Harbor and Neponsit began to be developed.

The completion of the Cross Bay Bridge in 1925, the further development of the beach and boardwalk in 1930, the completion of the Marine Parkway Bridge in 1937 and the improvements to the railroad services in 1941 were all the factors that made Rockaway more accessible to the working class people of New York.

The popularity of the Rockaways as a vacation spot began to decline significantly after World War II, when advances in transportation made more distant resorts and summer attractions more accessible and desirable. Businesses began to close down and only a handful of the main resort hotels remained as rooming houses and apartments. Many others were destroyed by fires or torn down as part of a large scale development projects and urban renewal programs.

Apartment houses, that numbered six in 1900, now exceed 200. The population of the Rockaways continued to increase from 80,000 in 1960 to just over 100,000 today.

The Rockaway Irish In Old Time Rockaway

After the Revolutionary War most of the British sympathizers choose not to stay and settle in New York. Irish names like Wilson, Everet, Higbie, Innis and Mills are examples of those found in local militia who organized in Hempstead town, which was part of Rockaway at the time, and areas known as Near Rockaway (Oceanside) and Far Rockaway.

During the War of 1812, a block-house was built at the point of the Rockaway peninsula, at approximately Beach 137 street, and manned round the clock by the military of New York City. Irishmen with last names like Finnegan Craig, McGuire, McGowan, Smith and Sweeney served here at Fort Decatur.

During the great Irish immigration to the United States in the mid 19th century, some immigrants settled in Far Rockaway. The "Sons of Ireland" living in Far Rockaway at the time listed names such as: Moran, Caffrey, McCarthy, Kelly, Reilly, Mulhearn, Hickey and Fitzpatrick. They all contributed to the development of the area, which by the 1850's became known as the Irish Saratoga.

Meanwhile, the Seaside section of the Rockaways began to grow as a summer resort. Many hotels and bath houses, complete with watering holes and restaurants, were constructed for the masses seeking relief at the seashore from the hot inner city. A local map dated in 1886 revealed examples of some of the following Irish surnames in Seaside: O'Brien, Norton, Curley, McLain, Farrell, Fannagan, Coghlan, Griffin and Ryan. As early as 1881 there were 48 bars in Seaside, most of which were operated by Irish owners.

After the great Seaside Fire, some proprietors began to rebuild new and larger establishments. Newcomers also bought land and put up hotels and amusements.

In 1893, James Keenan founded The Wave, Rockaway's community newspaper. By the turn of the century, Seaside, "Old Irish Town", resounded with names like McIntosh, McKeon, Finan, McVey, Kavanagh, Flynn, Allen, and Gilmore.

After World War I, peacetime brought the Roaring 20's. Prohibition, however, did not completely dry up the watering holes in Seaside. By 1933, when the Volstead Act was repealed, Seaside once again became the Mecca for the parched. Some of the favorite oases were: Allen's Dancehall, Grogans, Dick Smyth'', Hugh McNulty's, Michael Gilfather, Curly % Burns, J. Buckley, J. Rogers, Billings and Murphy, Hickey's, Harrington's, and the Crystal Hotel, just to mention a few.

The good times lasted until the beginning of World War II. Many establishments closed for the duration, with the remaining open ones taking up the slack, Servicemen were treated as royalty; and, despite rationing, good times were still to be had in Rockaway.

After World War II, Old Irish Town had a marvelous rebirth. In the 1950's, Playland was the center of attraction. The main attractions in Seaside now were the many bars in the area. These included O'Gara's Sligo House, The White House, Harbor Rest, Maher's, Smyth's, the Park Inn, the Mermaid Inn, Boggiano's and McWalter's, the Last Stop Inn, Riordan's, Gildea's, and the Irish Circle. In the name of civic improvement, less than a decade later, most of the section was torn down. Hi-rise apartments, a sewage disposal plant, shopping centers and parking lots, replaced the bungalows, bars, hotels and gaiety of Old Irishtown.

The portion of the old boulevard between Beach 108 street and Beach 109 street plays host each July to Rockaway's Irish Festival, and the Rockaway St. Patrick's Day, held the first Saturday in March, returns each year "No matter what!" (Excerpts taken from 100th Anniversary Collector's Edition, The Wave, July 24, 1993, Emil Lucev, Historian)

Broad Channel

Broad Channel is the only inhabited island in Jamaica Bay, connected to the mainland and the Rockaway peninsula by Cross Bay boulevard and its two bridges. It was at first just a small sand island surrounded by marsh, with only a few fishermen's shacks. But, by 1880, with the coming of the Bay Railroad, four large hotels and a fishing station were constructed in Broad Channel within a year; two on each side of the railroad trestle which crossed the island.

About the same time, two small villages, on stilts, The Raunt and Goose Creek, were established. Access to the villages was proved by elevated wooded walks and all necessities were brought to the villages by train.

The island was expanded by landfill and, by 1912, the City of New York took ownership. The Cross Bay Bridge opened in 1924 and Cross Bay Road was completed in 1926. By that time there were approximately 2,000 structures on the island and it continued to develop rapidly, eventually becoming a year-round residential community.

Breezy Point

Breezy Point has been described as "the playground of the chic Brooklyn Irish on the stylish Queens peninsula". It was not always a cooperative. In earlier days, bungalows could be rented in Breezy by city folks for as little as $20 a season. Today, a family spends upward of $5,000 to rent for the summer season and the prices of homes now range from the low $100,000's to upwards of $300,000.

In 1960, 800 acres were sold to the Atlantic Improvement State Corporation for $17,000,000. The residents of this seasonal community then got together and purchased half of the land for over $11,000,000 and the cooperative was formed. Breezy Point remains today a quiet private community consisting of about 3,500 homes, more than half of which are now lived in year 'round.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Looking back ..........

40 Years Ago...

Schwartz Appliances, 1518 Central Avenue, Far Rockaway, was burglarized for the second time in as many weeks. Radios and portable televisions were missing, reported police.

St. Camillus Band has been engaged to perform three times during New Year's weekend at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida.

Demolition work is underway on the old Public School 43 (Marlene's school she attended), located at Rockaway Beach Boulevard and Beach 111 Street. The school has been replaced by Public School 225 at Beach 110 Street. P.S. 43 is the last of the three school buildings which were started by the former Village of Rockaway Beach and finished by the City of New York following consolidation in 1898.

City officials are thankful that the site for the proposed South Queens High School on Beach 101 Street and Beach Channel Drive involves transfers of property under city ownership and not under private ownership.

50 Years Ago... Dr. and Mrs. Archibald O.M. Wood of Cornaga Avenue, Far Rockaway, have recently returned from a vacation trip to Cuba.

Carl Rappaport (Marlene's Stepfather) will be installed as president and Jack Braunstein will be reinstalled as chairman of the board of the Rockaway Beach Property Owners Association at a dinner dance at the Washington Hotel, Sunday evening.

James Doherty of 84-18 Rockaway Beach Boulevard, Hammels, has received a certificate of good citizenship from the State of New York, accompanied by a personal note from Governor Averill Harriman.
____________________________________________________________________________________
EVENT: Morris G. Swadener Jr. Life Mates: 21 Jun 1996, Bremerton Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington

[NI1415] Family of Owen and Ada May (Harner) Swadener - Xenia, Ohio

L to R: Esther, Herman, Etta, Ada (mother), Carrie (back), Lucille (baby), Owen (father), Clarence, Alice and Ethel Swadener. My father (Herman) was born on August 24, 1914 and he appears to be about 3 years old in this picture. He is presently 92. Owen Swadener's father was also named Owen Swadener. Herman and Lucille are still living - in Xenia, Ohio.

Ada May and Owen Swadener - Xenia, Ohio - taken in the late 1940's

[NI1428] WILLETT Harold F. Willett, 75, died Saturday, September 11, at his residence in Xenia, Ohio. He was born
October 31, 1923, in Greene County the son of John Franklin and Mary Etta Swadener Willett. He is survived
by his wife, Alma Jean (Moore) Willett, whom he married June 28, 1944; two daughters and sons-in-law,
Mary Lynn and Dan G. Bukey, Centerville, and Cheryl and Richard A. Thompson, Worthington; four
grandchildren, Michelle and Jill Bukey and Bryan and Lory Thompson; future grandsons-in-law, Marc Stewart
and Andrew Guthrie; also, survived by two brothers and sisters-in-law, Kenneth and Janet Willett, Xenia, and
John and Raylene Willett, Kettering; and two sisters and brothers-in-law, Helen and Earl Middleton, Akron,
and Kathryn and Carroll Compton, Xenia; and several nieces and nephews. He attended schools in Xenia,
Hampton - Sydney and the University if Virginia, while serving in the U.S. Navy. He was employed by Ohio
Bell Telephone Co. for 38 years. He was a member of Faith Community United Methodist Church, Xenia
Masonic Lodge #49, F. & A.M., Xenia Chapter # 36, R. A. M., and Wright Council #96, R. & S. M. Services
will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, September 14, at Faith Community United Methodist Church, 100 Country
Club Dr., Xenia, with Rev. Stephen Gill officiating. Visitation will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday at the NEELD
FUNERAL HOME, 1276 N. Detroit St., Xenia, with masonic services at 8:30 p.m. Monday and from 10 a.m.
Tuesday, until service time, at the church. Contributions may be made to Hospice of Clinton County, 61 E.
Main St., Wilmington, Oh., 45177.

[NI1430] WILLETT Harold F. Willett, 75, died Saturday, September 11, at his residence in Xenia, Ohio. He was born October 31, 1923, in Greene County the son of John Franklin and Mary Etta Swadener Willett. He is survived by his wife, Alma Jean (Moore) Willett, whom he married June 28, 1944; two daughters and sons-in-law, Mary Lynn and Dan G. Bukey, Centerville, and Cheryl and Richard A. Thompson, Worthington; four grandchildren, Michelle and Jill Bukey and Bryan and Lory Thompson; future grandsons-in-law, Marc Stewart and Andrew Guthrie; also, survived by two brothers and sisters-in-law, Kenneth and Janet Willett, Xenia, and John and Raylene Willett, Kettering; and two sisters and brothers-in-law, Helen and Earl Middleton, Akron, and Kathryn and Carroll Compton, Xenia; and several nieces and nephews.

He attended schools in Xenia, Hampton - Sydney and the University if Virginia, while serving in the U.S. Navy. He was employed by Ohio Bell Telephone Co. for 38 years. He was a member of Faith Community United Methodist Church, Xenia Masonic Lodge #49, F. & A.M., Xenia Chapter # 36, R. A. M., and Wright Council #96, R. & S. M. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, September 14, at Faith Community United Methodist Church, 100 Country Club Dr., Xenia, with Rev. Stephen Gill officiating. Visitation will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday at the NEELD FUNERAL HOME, 1276 N. Detroit St., Xenia, with masonic services at 8:30 p.m. Monday and from 10 a.m. Tuesday, until service time, at the church. Contributions may be made to Hospice of Clinton County, 61 E. Main St., Wilmington, Oh., 45177.

[NI1441] Matthew E. Swadener: graduated with double majors of Japanese and Spanish (1997), currently employed by Nikko Salomon Smith Barney in Japan.

"Hailing from a small community within rural Ohio (Youngstown, Ohio), I would have never dreamed of the opportunities that I have realized as a direct result of the Japanese program at The University of Findlay. The professors and teaching assistants truly opened their hearts
and wisdom to me in those four years, even granting me several opportunities to see Japan first hand. Now, at the young age of 26, I have been living in Japan for nearly five years. And my job, I can honestly say, is one of international grandeur and one for which I now hold
self-esteem. With a willingness to learn and even be scolded and the effort required to advance, I firmly believe anyone afforded the chances that UF has to offer can move onto whatever he or she seeks."

Just a note that I was born at 11:01am on 27 July 1975 at Northside Hospital in Youngstown, Ohio. I have A+ blood type, hazel-grey eyes and chestnut hair.

From an e-mail sent by Matt.

As of 7 April 2003, my company re-branded and is now known as Nikko Citigroup Ltd. It was formerly called Nikko Salomon Smith Barney Ltd. Could you please update the note under NI1441, about me?

Please also include the following profile/data there.

Current Employment:
Nikko Citigroup Ltd. - Brokerage
(venture 51% Nikko Cordial 49% Citigroup)
Operations Division, Security Coding

Current Permenant Residency:
1. JAPAN - Suginamiku, Tokyo
2. U S A - Youngstown, Ohio

Foreign Language Fluency - Oral:
1. Japanese (advanced)
2. Spanish (intermediate)
3. Portuguese/French (beginner)

Foreign Language Fluency - Written/Script:
1. Latin (Spanish-high)
2. Latin (Portuguese-high)
3. Latin (French-high)
4. Latin (Italian-intermediate)
5. Latin (Finnish-beginner)
6. Pictograms (Japanese Kanji-high)
7. Pictograms (Korean Kanja-beginner)
8. Kana (Japanese Phonetics-high)
9. Hangul (Korean Phonetics-beginner)
10 Thai (beginner)
11 Cyrillic (Russian-beginner)

Other Skills:
High level of Computer Literacy in applications such as Outlook, Word, Excel, Power Point, Acrobat, Ghost Writer, etc.

Hobbies:
1. Constructed Languages a.k.a. Conlang
2. Travelling & Tourist Activity
3. Exotic Cuisine & Culture Exhibitions
4. Regular Bicycling
5. Men's Issues
6. Japan, The Nordic Countries (Scandinavia+Baltics)

Creed:
Caucasian/White

Sexuality:
Homo/Gay

Favorite Place in The World (to date):
1. Tokyo
2. Bangkok
3. Copenhagen
4. Seoul
____________________________________________________________________________________
From an e-mail from Matt on 02/09/07
Thought I'd share this info with you - it's my updated profile for theAnaheim University MBA Program. The 2nd course (I will take Human Resources Management) starts 19th Feb and looks to be tremendously difficult, much more than the last one! We have a 700 page textbook to cover in 6 weeks, plus a team project requiring external research, a personal final project, and a series of lectures on dvd based off which we have video assignments as well, not to mention the daily student-to-student forums. You might not hear much from me until the course finishes in April. Anyway, the below might give you a very general idea of what I've been up these past several years.

7.5 years - Operations, Nikko Citigroup Ltd. - Security Coding, which handles financial instruments data control and deals with a multitude of projects and relations with counterparts in NY, London/Dublin, HK, Sydney

8.5 years (to be 9 years exactly on 7th March 2007) - Residency in Tokyo, Japan (1st year I worked at Pasona Softbank HQ recruiting)

Additional 1.5 years in Japan as an undergraduate student - homestay & language program in Gifu Prefecture (junior year, summer 1995); general internship program for both business Japanese as well as the seed manufacturing industry at Tokita Seed Co in Omiya, Saitama Prefecture, through the Ohio State University (summer 1996); general internship program for both business Japanese as well as the car parts manufacturing industry at Sanoh Industrial Co in Koga-shi, Ibaraki Prefecture, through its
affiliate company HiSan and the University of Findlay in Ohio, USA (10 months ending in summer 1997)

Languages - English (native), Japanese (high proficiency), Spanish (intermediate-high), Portuguese (intermediate), French (low-intermediate), Bahasa Indonesian (can get by if on vacation)

Other proficiencies - Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Adobe, Explorer/Internet etc. - basically all the typical apps one uses nowadays in large firms

Misc. - Spanish 6-week intensive course completed at Cemanahuac Institute in Cuernavaca, Mexico (summer 1994); Turkish 2-week intensive course completed at EF Dil in Istanbul, Turkey (summer 2004); several foreign language related test honors (eg, Nihongo Noryoku Shiken level 2, JETRO Business Japanese, Martin Essex Award, etc); several horsemanship technique related honors (when I was a young lad); well-traveled for a 31 year-old (to approx 15 countries); regularly attend cardio exercise lessons such as boxercise and aerobics; earned the 4th belt (green) in Kyokushin Karate in 2004; experienced 3 months of lessons in Indonesian Pencak Silat and even attempted Brazilian Capoeira and Korean Tae Kwon Do (unable to continue due to lack of time during the week); homestay & Korean 1-week crash course in Seoul (1998)

Favorite Places Traveled - 1. Bali, Indonesia; 2. Istanbul, Turkey; 3. Tallinn, Estonia

Least Favorite Travel - 1. Phnom Penh, Cambodia (be ware of "happy pizza"); 2. Ho Chi Minh, Viet Nam

Reason for joining AU MBA Program - Simply put, to learn more and in a variety of different fields relating to international business, just for the pleasure of it! I hope to attain more knowledge so as to integrate into a meaningful way in my pursuit of an interesting but challenging career. Learning is the key to all; and if I can use this knowledge to benefit my own advancement, then my ultimate goal is to help the many kind people I have met in Indonesia and elsewhere, who can barely afford a loaf of bread.
__________________________________________________________________________________
E-mail Received 02-14-07
Hi Butch

When I get more time, I will have to write you a longer proper email onthis, but I notice several places on the website where you could add more information. I can provide you more info on : Phyllis Jean Doane (Wallis), Norman Hahn, and pretty much anyone directly related to me like Carolyn Lee
Hall.

For instance, Phyllis Jean Doane (Wallis) was my Gram who just passed away. I will have to check the funeral write-up, but I believe the official time of death was 15 January 2007. She was born on 24 February, and died at 81(just about to be 82), so do the math - I think she was born in 1924 if not
mistaken. Her mother (Catherine Wylde Doane), with whom I was even close, died in December 1992 - but I do not know the exact date. I can't remember Great Grandma Doane's birthday, but it was probably in November. Note that these grandmothers are not my actual blood relatives, but they raised me as if I were. I miss them very much. Now, Dan Wallis died in 1982(?) of cancer - he smoked a lot so ended up having one of those voice boxes as he had a hole in his throat! Joel Ronald Wallis, my brother, is living in Sarasota (Florida) and works as a handyman. My other brother, Eric Timothy Wallis, is in the Army, something like a Colonel and main administrator of a hospital; he is married to Heidi and adopted her kids from a previous marriage - Garric ("Rick") and Brittany (who just got married), and they have permanent residence in Alaska, although Heidi is currently in Texas and
Eric in Virginia for further training. Eric plans to retire from the Army in about 2-3 years and move to Southern Alaska.

As for Rosemary DiPiero, I heard she just got into a car accident with her brother driving. I am not clear on her life, if she is still in Florida or moved to California, but she writes to me occasionally. Her son (my biological father) disappeared after that one single call to me when I was 18 in 1993; so I get the idea as to the kind of man he is. I think Rosemary's mother might be named Jean or Jeanne?? Not sure.

My mom (Carolyn Lee Hall)'s ex-husband, J.C. Bard, died in a motorcycle accident from what I was told. I think he was killed before I was born, so early 70s (pre 1975). Are you sure my mom got married to Donald in 1976?? I was born July 1975, so does that make me a bastard then? Or perhaps I am really not a Swadener, could I be the son of this J.C. guy? My mom never talks about her past; she seems to feel guilt over it.

Now, Ronald Hall and Edith McKee (my mom's parents) had 2 boys and 2 girls. My mom is the 3rd, I think. Edith McKee was born on 16 January, but I do not know what year (she was very careful with her age!). She died of lung cancer. I do not know about Ronald Hall; he was deceased long before I was born. In fact, my Grandmother got remarried to Kenneth Winters - so my mom's mom is known to me as Grandma Winters. Kenneth Winters passed away in the mid 90s, but I am not sure of the date (we were not very close). My mom's eldest brother is Leonard Hall, followed by Ronald Hall Jr. (who died in the 90s of a heart attack, my Uncle Ronnie the trucker), then my mom's younger (and crazy) sister Michelle Hall. Michelle, called Shelley, got married at least twice - once to Richard Roth Sr., with whom she bore my cousins - Richard Roth Jr. (born 16 April, I think in 1979?) and Scott Roth
- and then again with a man named Tom Simchak - with whom she bore Regina ("Gina") Simchak, who is about 19 or 20 now. Speaking of Regina, I think that might be the middle name of my great grandmother - my mom's grandmother (Mary, who was married to Finley McKee). I remember when Gina was born that they took Regina from Grandma McKee's name, but I do not know Mary McKee's
maiden name (as she was dead before I can recall). All I ever heard of Great Grandma McKee is that she was a bit wacko; very tempted but a good lady.

Anyway, that's enough for now. I should write up something else more proper eventually. There is some detail for me that could even be updated.

Regards: Matt (Matthew Eugene Swadener)

[NI1443] Lars and Debby were divorced in 2005.

[NI1449] Avid soccer player.

[NI1472] 1850 Census

Swadener

NameAgeOccupationWorthBorn

Issac47Farmer4874Maryland
Evline36Ohio
Owen15Ohio
Issac8Ohio

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacob41Farmer200
Martha39
Eliza11
Martha8
Jacob E.5

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adam38Farmer2000Maryland
Mary A.28Maryland
George W9Ohio
William H7
Albert5
Mary6
Mabell1
Sussana76Maryland

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

William65Farmer2000Maryland
Hannah45Pow ?
Mary27Ohio
Samuel25Carpenter
Erh?10Farmer
Catharine11
_________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from local newspaper date January 1887

DEATH IN GREEN COUNTY
Issac Swadner, age 84 years, probably the oldest resident of Bevercreek Township, Green County rode 7 miles to visit his son at OldTown, last Sabbath. Vigorouse as the old gentleman seemed, however, the exercise proved too viloet for him, bringing on as it did an acute attack of stomach trouble and from which he died in less than twenty-four hours after reaching his home. He is buried at Union Church near Byron.

[NI1480] From: ROSEMARIE DIPIERO
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2007 9:57 PM
To: Matt Swadener - home acct
Subject: Re: Holiday Wishes from Matt


PLEASE FORGIVE ME FOR NOT SENDING YOU SOONER A RESPONES. I DO HOPE YOU HAD A GREAT HOLIDAY. MINE WAS QUIET BUT NICE . I SPENT IT WITH YOUR UNCLE
TIM AND AUNT ANDREA. IT WAS VERY NICE. SINCE MY ACCIDENT I WASN'T SURE IF I WAS
ABLE TO GO TO YOUR GREATGRANDMAS OR NOT. I AM SORRY I WAS NOT ABLE TO TELL
YOU BUT I WAS IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT ON 9-03-06. WAS IN MY BROTHERS CAR, HE WAS DRIVING AND WE ROLLED OVER 3X'S THANK GOD FOR SEAT BELTS . I WAS IN I.C.U.
FOR 1WEEK AND IN THE HOSP. 2 WEEKS AND THEN WAS PUT IN A REHAP HOME FOR A MONTH TO LEARN TO HOW TO WALK AGIN AND FULL OF PAIN. THANK GOD NOTHING WAS SHOWN AS BROKEN. ANYWAY OUR LORD DIDN'T WANT ME NOW SO I AM DOING A LOT BETTER. LOTS OF PAIN BUT SLOWLY I AM OK. TIM HAS BE REALLY HELPING ME A LOT AND IS TAKING CARE OF EVERY THING. MY MOTHER YOUR G.GRANDMOTHER WILL BE 93 ON 1-27-07 . UNCLE TIM WILL DRIVE ME UP TO HER HOUSE. SHE LIVES ABOUT 60 MILES FROM TAMPA. DOES REAL GREAT. I AM GOING TO HAVE TO SIGN OFF NOW MY HANDS
ARE STARTING TO SHAKE. JUST WANT YOU TO KNOW . I STILL THINK ABOUT YOU AND DO LOVE YOU. I HAVE A CALLING CARD NOW IF YOU SEND ME YOUR TELE # I WILL TRY TO
CALL YOU.

GOD BLESS YOU WITH ALL MY LOVE
GRANDMOM ROSEMARIE

DIPIERO, Dante J., `Dan`, 83, passed away August 23, 2002 at home. Born in Youngstown, Ohio, he moved to Tampa in 1980. Survivors include his loving wife of 28 years, Rosemarie; sons, Donald E. Swadener, Jr., Timothy J. Swadener and Andrea Kaplan and Terrence Lee Swadener, Sr.; daughter, Renee Gallagher and husband Patrick; sisters, Gilda DiPiero, Ida DiPiero, Dina DiPiero and Clara Jones; gra ndchildren, Matthew Swadener, Desiree Swadener, Terrence Lee Swadener, Jr., Kevin Dante Swadener, Shawna Gallagher and Megan Renee Gallagher; great-grandson, Dominic Gallagher. Mr. DiPiero was a member of Incarnation Catholic Church and was a retired Foreman from the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad. He was a US Army Veteran of World War II being awarded two Bronze Stars. Mr. DiPiero was an avid bowler, a member of the Senior Stars, American Legion and the Elks. He was a devoted and loving husband and father. Visitation will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, August 28, 2002 at the Town & Country Chapel of Mark III Funeral Home with a Wake service at 7 p.m. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, August 29, 2002 at Incarnation Catholic Church. Interment will follow at a later date to Florid a National Cemetery in Bushnell, Fla. with full military honors. In lieu of flowers, the family desires contributions in Dan's memory to LifePath Hospice, 3010 W. Azeele St., Tampa, FL 33609. MARK III FUNERAL HOME, 885-5088.

[NI1659] Taken from a Genelogy complied by various members of the McGuire Family.

Edwin and Mabel moved to Neskika, Washington, in the fall of 1919, to a small farm. They were encourged to move there by an uncle of Edwin's. It was a hard place to make a living.

They moved to Centralia in 1930, which was during the depression years. Mabel's brother Rueben bought a farm in northen Minnesota. They bought a truck and moved there in the spring of 1937. After living there for some time they sold their belongings and prepared to move to the west. Edwin had surgery before they moved and died from a blood clot.

Helen, Dick, bob and Mabel drove in an old car to Washington in the fall of 1947. They all lived with Harvey and LaRue for two months. Helen and LaRue worked at a box factory. They moved to East Raymond in November 1947.

Harvey built a small house for her on their prpeprty and she lived there until her death in June, 1972. Mabel passed away at the South Bend Hospital, South Bend, Washington on June 1, !972.


Memories.....as related from Chuck Pinckney

"My grandmother Pinckney (see Sadie McCaskey) died in Omaha in June 1934. I remember it was June because we went down from Fargo right after school was out. I was eight years old. Aunt Mabel McGuire was the only one of the brothers and sisters who couldn't come to the funeral, so my folks decided to go out and see her in Centralia. Quite a trip in 1934...we had a homemade camp trailer and camped out every night. Don took me under his wing (he was 13) and we went all over town on his bike, skinny-dipping in the Skookumchuck River and all the fun things.

The McGuire family moved to Northern Minnesota in the Spring of 1937 and stopped off to see us in Fargo for a few days. I remember mom sending us down to the bakery to buy day-old bread at a nickle a loaf! While they were there the Hindenburg went down back in Lakehurst, NJ. After they were established on the farm we would occassionally go up for a week-end. We moved back to Maryland in the spring of 1941 and I didn't see any of the McGuires's again until Georgia and I moved to Portland after I gout out of college in 1941."

(excerpt from a letter written by Chuck Pinckney to Carol Hall, February 25, 1995)

[NI1661] Obituary published in the Willapa Harbor Herald, Wednesday, April 18, 2001

Longtime Raymond resident Harvey G. McGuire, 87, died on Thursday, April 12, 2001, at Willapa Harbor Care Center in Raymond, Washington. He was born on September 14, 1913, in Arnold, Nebraska, a son of Edwin and Mabel (Pinckney) McGuire. He graduated from Centralia High School.

He married LaRue Henkel on July 25, 1936, in Centralia, and they moved to Raymond soon after.

Mr. McGuire had been a Raymond resident for the past 65 years. He worked in various local mills and then worked for more than 38 years at the RaymondPublic Utilities District. He enjoyed keeping up with current events and technology, camping, and fix-it projects. He was a member of the United Church of Raymond.

He is survivied by his wife of Raymond; two daughters, Carol Hall and Nadine Boren, both of Vancouver; his son, Duane McGuire of American Fork, Utah; two sisters, Helen Fagan of Elma and Betty Dvergsten of Cambridge, Minnesota; a brother, Frank McGuire of Springfield; six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. He was proceeded in death by a brother, Don, in 1991.

Funeral services were held April 17 at Stoller's Mortuary in Raymond. Vault internment followed at Fern Hill Cemetery in Menlo. Memorials may be made to the United Church of Raymond, 5th and Duryea, Raymond, WA 98577; or to the Murphy Ambulance Fund, P.O. Box 213, Raymond. Stollers's Morturay was in charge of arrangements.

[NI1683] near causing hisddeExcerpt taken from a Published Genealogy:

The Pinckney Family in America

The earliest progenitor of the family of whom I have been able to find and record was one ROBERT DE PINKENY, a Scottish nobleman, of Norman Descent, and having estates in England. He was one of the members of a coucil called by King Edward of England, about the year 1291, for the purpose of determining the succession to the Scottish crown, for which there were four claimants, Robert Bruce, John Baliel, John Cemyn and William Ross. Most of the nobility of Scotland attended the council, DE PINKENY among them.

Some time about 1720 three brothers named PINCKNEY...the name being changed by that time...came from Northumberland, England, to the Colonies of America. Charles Pinckney settled in South Carolina, William Pinckney in Duchess County, New York and Jonathan Pinckney in Albany County, New York. As above indicated, they were of Scottish descent. It is probably that William was the eldest and Jonathan the youngest of the three.

William Pinckney had two sons, Ezekiel, born about 1730, and Thomas, two years younger. The latter became a famous athlete. His height was just six feet, his weight about 260 pounds, although he is said to have no surplus of flesh. On one occasion he equaled Washington's famous jump of 22 feet. One of his favorite ambitions was to jump over a rope held at six feet from the ground, clearing it with ease with a forward or backward jump. Or he would spring from the ground, turn completely over in the air and alight with his feet on the same spot from which he started. Considering the manners and customs of the time in which he lived it is remarkable that he never but once struck a man...one of two who attempted to give him a beating when he was about 18 years of age. The one blow broke several of his assailant's ribs and came so near causing his death that Thomas declared he would never again strike a man. Occassionally some blustering bully would take advantage of this pledge, but if he became too abusive Pinckney would lay him on the ground and set his feet on him until a premise of good behavior was given.

Ezekiel Pinckney was also a very muscular and powerful man, six feet three inches in height, but not as remarkable ofr strength as was his brother Thomas. I have no knowledge of either members of this family.

What part either William Pinckney or his sons bore in the Revolution I have not been able to learn, but Ezekiel's son, John Pinckney, entered the colonial army at the age of 16, serving first as a teamster; afterward entered the ranks, and at the close of the war , as for time previous, was a member of General Washington's personal guard. After the war was ofer he married and became the father of two daughters, Emily and Susan...one of whom afterward married a Mr. Vrmilia (or Vermilyea) and the other a Mr. Lawson. the mother of these daughters having died, he again married and had one son, Joseph, whose mother died when the boy as but 12 days old. He was brought up by his grandfather Ezekiel Pinckney. This Joseph Pinckney was born December 9, 1795 and died June 16, 1871. On July 20, 1817 he was married to Sophia Blanden (or Blandin) who was a little more than two months younger that he (born Feb 17, 1796. To them were born 9 children.

Source 1: We are not really sure who complied this information but it was in Grandma Mabel McGuire's files. She attended several of the PInchkney family reunions so she may have received this information there. {1991 & 1994 Editions}

Source 2: family Bible, "presented to Harvey M. Pinckney by his parents on his 18th birthday, July 14, 1875", from information provided by chuck Pinckney, May 1995. {1997 Edition}

[NI1742] Appalachian State University - Dean's List

To qualify for the Dean's List, a student must either be enrolled for 12 to 14 hours of academic credit and attain a 3.45 grade point average or be enrolled in 15 or more hours of academic credit and attain a 3.25 grade point average.

Spring Semester 2006 - COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Stefani Grace Kolomichuk / English / Sophomore / Fayetteville
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stefania Grace Kolomichuk &
Benjamin Judson Greene


Stefania Grace Kolomichuk of Fayetteville and Benjamin Judson Greene of Atlanta, were married at 6 p.m. on September 2, 2006, at Fayetteville Bible Chapel, with the groom’s father officiating.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gary Wayne Kolomichuk of Fayetteville. Her maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Roy Franco of Tucson, Ariz.; Mrs. Grace Swadener and the late Melvin Swadener of Lemon Grove, Calif. Her paternal grandparents are Mr. Myron Richner and the late Rita Richner; and Mr. and Mrs. Nick Kolomichuk of Cleveland, Ohio.

The bridegroom’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Judson Greene of Fayetteville. His maternal grandparents are Mrs. Patty Lantz and the late Charles Lantz; and the late Jack Ball of Hollywood Fla. His paternal grandparents are Judson Greene and the late Marian Greene, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

The bride wore a white strapless matte satin A-line gown with Swarovski crystals and seed pearls with a bow on the bodice cuff and covered buttons down the full-length train. The elbow-length veil featured Swarovski crystals and seed pearls. She carried a bouquet of red roses.

The bride was escorted by her father. The maid of honor was Amy Sansom of Nashville, Tenn. The bridesmaids were Allison Collins of Mars Hills; Jennifer Stuck of Nyack, N.Y.; Charis Ellison and Angela Hines, both of Fort Worth, Texas. The flower girl was Kimberly Davenport, the ring purser was Hannah Davenport, and the guest book attendant was Aimee Davenport, the bride’s cousins from Keller, Texas.

The best man was David Goodman of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The groomsmen were Josh Sasscer of Bryson City; Woody Barrosse of Fayetteville; Jon Formo of Lynchburg, Va.; and Kevin Weldon of Middleton, Del.

The wedding was directed by Jacqueline Foote. The wedding musicians were Michelle and David McCallum. A reception, hosted by the bride’s parents, was held in historic downtown Fayetteville at the Braz-N-Rabbit.

The bride is a graduate of Sonlight Christian Academy. She received her education from Appalachian State University.

The bridegroom is a graduate of New Hope Christian Academy. He received his degree from the Savannah College of Art and Design. He is employed by Radical Axis, a production studio in Atlanta.

After a honeymoon mountain retreat in Spruce Pines, the couple will make their home in Atlanta.

[NI1747] As told by daughter Janet Kay Swadener-Fertig:
Harry Robert Swadener had a brother named John and 2 other siblings. They grew up in Logansport, Indiana. Their father died during WWII and their mother was said to be half american indian. His sister denyed it and John acknowledged being indian. Harry Robert served in WWII with the 36th Division (T Patchers). John served in the Navy. Their other brother Peewee also died in the war.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The 36th Infantry Division, Texas National Guard, a history as told by Harry Robert Swadener

The beginning history of the 36th Division started in 1835 at the Alamo in the Texas Revolution. The Division served with Honor in World War I.

Between the Wars the Division was known as the Texas National Guard. The National Guard was mobilized on November 25, 1940 at Camp Bowie, Texas and thereafter was known as the 36th Division, United States Army.

After training in various parts of the United States the Division was shipped out of New York P.O.E. and landed at Oran, Africa eleven days later. More training was at hand, then the Division made D-Day landing at Salerno, Italy September 9, 1943. The 36th Division as the First Division on European soil in World War II! The landing cost the Division 7,000 of the 15,000 men and officers who went ashore that day.

From Salerno, the Division went north from there to places like San Pietro, Altivilla, and Mignano Venafro.

Next came the Rapido River, a small river, but deadly. The (American) G.I.'s fought and died to cross but did not and could not cross (the river). After the Rapido came Mount Cassino and the Abby.

The Abby was thought by many soldiers as a lookout for artillery firing. The Abby was bombed by the 15th Air Force to rubble, making it harder to finally be taken.

On to Rome and still North to Piombino, where the Division stopped for R&R and getting ready for the Southern France invasion.

August 15, 1944, the 36th Division landed on the coast of Southern France at 0800 in the morning. A big Naval shelling proceeded the landing and all went better than expected.

There are many French towns that come to mind. Frejus, St. Rapheal, Digne, Sistrom Grenoble, Montelimar, Remeremont, Nancy, Lyons, Ribeauville. A Rest Camp at Bains-Les-Baines provided a good clean clothes and a rest for the G.I.'s after their many days on the Line.

The Division was at Strasbourg when a halt was called after 133 continuous days of fighting. There had been almost 20,000 prisoners taken since the Division landed in Southern France.

The Division crossed the Rhine River into Germany and the towns of Munich, Kufstein, (and) many others that the ones that were there will remember and remain in their minds for a long time.

At the end of World War II, the Division pulled Occupation Duty for a while then came home to a welcome. Those with enough "Points" came home before the main body of the Divisions. (Robert states, "I had 80 points".

The 36th Division earned many honors and medals and the men received this list (of medals and awards).

Awarded The French Croix de Guerre
15 Congressional Medals of Honor
12 Presidential Unit Citations (The MP's were awarded one, Robert was assigned to an MP unit)
2, 354 Silver Stars
5,407Bronze Stars
80 Distinguished Service Crosses
2 Bronze Arrowheads for D-Day Landings
7 Campaign Stars

The Division suffered over 19,000 +- casualties but captured 175,806 enemy
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
As told by Harry Robert Swadener in a letter to Morris G. Swadener Jr. dated March 23, 2002. Robert was 79 years of age at the date of this writing and had just lost his wife Jane (January 24, 2002) after 55 years of marriage.

The Military History of Robert Swadener 35091146 USA (Ret)

I was called to active duty February 13, 1943 (age 19). From the induction center at Indianapolis, Indiana, I went to Fort Harrison for the usual shots, clothing, and the usual things of being inducted into the Army. I stayed at the Fort (Harrison) about a week doing K.P. duty and other things already!

From Fort Harrison I entrained to Camp Wheeler, Georgia. It was a fairly long trip and at night the shades of the (train) car were drawn because of the threat of reprisals by those who didn't like the military. The morning was cold and dark and pine trees around so we thought we were in Michigan somewhere.

The men were assigned to companies, platoons, and squads for Basic Training. The third week of a thirteen-week training period I broke a bone in my foot and continued to train wit it because nobody would believe it was broken. I did the usual drills, KP duties, exercises and combat training that goes to make a soldier out of a civilian. The last week of training was a 20-mile forced march with full field pack, rifle and the works.

This is where one outfit covers the 20 miles in the shortest time possible. I told the people in charge that there was no way I could even start the way my foot was. I was sent to the Base Hospital at Camp Wheeler where X-rays were taken and confirmed that my foot was broken. It had almost healed by had healed crooked. No cast was put on, just let it finish healing. I stayed in the hospital about a week.

While in the hospital, the men I trained with were shipped to the P.O.E. (Port of Embarkation). I was transferred to Camp Swift, Texas and continued more combat training, such as crawling under barbed wire with (live) machine guns firing, scaling high fences, hand-to-hand fighting. This lasted about two months and I came home for a week.

After getting back to Camp Swift, Texas a bunch of us were shipped out to Hampton Roads, Virginia, (a) P.O.E. We boarded a Liberty Ship loaded (with) tanks, trucks, and other war material. At dusk we sailed and I watched the lights of America fade in (to) the distance.

After twenty-three days on the ocean and going past the "Rock of Gibraltar" we landed in Oran, Africa. From this Port we were trucked to a Military Camp where the ones already there gave out a greeting. "You'll be sorry!" We did the same thing to the ones who came in after us.

While at this camp, more training for combat. There were night marches, guard duty around the Camp, and the day-to-day living. I remember on five (5) mile walk/run session that I was in the lead position and remembering my broken foot experience. I started out slow so that the ones in the rear wouldn't have to run. For some reason, the back of a column goes faster than the front. The G.I. behind me didn't like going slow, so he went around me and took off. I proceeded to get back in the front of him to slow things down. This happened a couple of times before the officer in charge saw it. Fortunately I was in front when he did see so we continued as a reasonable speed. It was an easy run with no gear or such.

While in Africa, I went to Mine and Demolition School where we learned to use explosives, set booby traps, find and dismantle booby traps and also (learned) on night recon trips. I was the lead machine gunner for the crawling course while there.

After a short time in Africa, we boarded another ship and ended up at Naples, Italy. I walked across the side of a scuttled ship to get on land. We walked to the (local) racetrack and put up (our) pup tents.

About two days later I heard my name called and into another truck I went. The next stop was headquarters of the 30th Division. I was put in the Military Police Platoon. Praise the Lord it wasn't the Infantry! I don't know if the deaths of my two brothers in service had anything to do with the assignment or not but I didn't think of it at that time. I was told of my two brothers deaths while in Africa.

The outfit was on the side of a mountain and we could watch Vesuvius erupting (1944). Before we moved out of the area, I was able to go into Pompeii, Italy where the volcano had covered up the old city.

I chanced to meet one of the men I had trained with back at Camp Wheeler and he told me that a lot of the me we trained with had died in combat already. Maybe my broken foot was a Godsent!

The Military Police Platoon in combat takes charge of Prisoners of War, just after being captured at the Front, directing traffic to and from the front, and regular police duties involved in war.

One time while in Italy, we had stopped for something that was going on up the road.
We had our backs against a stone fence. In the valley, a P-38 fighter was weaving between the mountains. It was going fast, real fast, because by the time we got to our feet and turned around the plane was gone. Must have been a camera-equipped plane.

We were a rear area when the show "Song of Bernadette" was being shown. A very moving and inspirational picture. Usually when a reel was changed, the men are noisy, carrying on and generally rowdy. During this picture, no sound was heard. I remember walking back to our camp about a mile or so by myself, at night, and didn't think about it. Now that I think back, I could have become fair game for (the) enemy.

The Platoon had been sent to the rear area for a short while and as night came along, we saw a strange and welcomed sight. Headlights on the supply trucks coming up the road! A whole column was coming up the road looking like fireflies after not seeing them for a long time.

As we moved through Italy, The Abby a Cassino was a snag. I was assigned a place for road duty and there was a small building that we could use for sleeping and staying in. I had no sooner settled down with my back to the wall that a shell came in close. The wall slapped my back hard. We got our gear together fast and moved out before another came in. We ran across a field to a larger house not even thinking about mines.
I was on duty below the Abbey when the bombers came and pulverized the place. We could watch the dive-bombers going in and their bombs hitting. While on duty at the crossroads one night, a machine gunner down the valley had seen some movement far up on the mountain and started shooting. It if hadn't been wartime, it would have been a pretty sight! The tracer bullets mad a very large arc, high in the air, and landed smack in the doorway of a hut clear across the valley.

Moving up through Italy, Rome stands out in my mind. I was able to go to St. Peter's Cathedral and to the top and other places of interest. The Coliseum, the large fountains and other places that slip my mind.

August 15, 1944 the Division landed in Southern France. I landed about 3:00 PM, D-Day. We were waked up about 3:00 AM that morning, supposedly for breakfast but never got any. After waiting a while we were told to go over the side using cargo nets down into the landing craft. When we landed I stepped out onto dry land. Didn't even get my feet wet!

The bad part was coming. We set up Headquarters in a house overlooking the bay. There were LST's and other ships waiting to unload and a German plane came over and put a bomb down the stack of o0ne of the ships. The Navy men got off the shop as soon as it was hit but the Army people stayed on. The ship drifted under the Headquarters and started to blow up. The Ship was loaded with a battery of "Long-Toms", 155mm cannon, a battery of anti-aircraft guns and all the trucks, ammo, gasoline, and supplies for an Invasion.

The ship blew up three or four times, knocking us to our knees and then there was a tinkling on our helmets as the shrapnel came after the blow-up. The Army people didn't not get off until the ship grounded so a lot of the 36th Division men were hurt. I remember directing quite a few men to the house (for) first aid. We were supposed to have breakfast before going ashore but I don't remember eating or sleeping until about two days later. One of the men chased a flaming can of gasoline to put it out before it did more damage.

We moved through Southern France. Our Headquarters building was noticed by a German plane one day and that night their big 16-inch railroad gun started shooting at us. The first round was short, the second was long and the fortunately the Free French men got the gun before the third round came in or we would have been it. All the doors that were closed in our building that were closed were blow out of their casings by the force of the explosions.

One time the C.O. (Commanding Officer) told us to get a new place to hold P.O.W's. The LT picked me and a few others and said "Let's Go". We started up the road and the tanks were stopped on the side of the road. The LT said keep going so we went past the infantry. Just then a burst of German machine pistol rattled through the nearby trees and everyone hit the side of the road. The LT landed in a patch of poison ivy! We made it back to safety but the LT had a lot of itch. We never did find a place that day.

Another time we were sent out to find a place for prisoners and the LT got lost. There was a Frenchman out in the fields working and the LT, in fractured French started asking directions. Getting nowhere, the Frenchman, in perfect English, told him where to go. A light side of the War.

Another time a new place was needed so off we went again. This time we went into this town and nobody was there. We looked at the map and this town was still in enemy territory. The town was Lyons and we were the first Americans in there. We got out in a hurry before the Germans came back.

After France came Bavaria, Austria, and Germany. I remember Munich, Ulm, Strasburg, and others. Lots of other towns and villages were liberated by the 30th Division. We also liberated a concentration camp that I remember going by.

The Platoon was moving from one place to another in Bavaria, which has lots of mountains. The Black Forest is also there and it is beautiful. I was on the top of an oxo (?) truck along with a few other men coming down the mountain and we kept going faster and faster. We went trough some clouds on the way down, which didn't help a bit. After we got down the mountain the driver asked us how we liked coming down the mountain without any brakes? Seems he missed the proper gear for low speed and could not engage the proper one.

Another time we took some P.O.W's and went through a forest looking for M.I.A's and K.I.A's. We found a couple of German bodies that were turned over to Graves Registration. We were fortunate not to find American people.

All along the roads and in the fields were bloated bodies of cows and horses. About twice the ordinary size of live ones and they sure did smell horrible.

There are a lot of memories that flood the mind (while) writing this. Italy in the winter, in the summer other countries with the seasons and views. Ice cream in the German winter made from fresh fallen snow, cooking Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, (and) the beauty of the mountains.

We were in a place guarding prisoners and there had been rumors of a German counter-attack coming through our sector. All at once there was a great and heavy machine gun fire and we thought that the attack had started! Turns out that the war had ended and the guns were fired for celebration.

The platoon went to various places and ended up in a town called Geislingen, Germany after the War. We pulled Occupation Duty. We checked the people for various things related to Peace and curfew violations.

We went to a couple of camps on the way home and left Southern France and saw the rock of Gibraltar again. On the way home in the Atlantic Ocean we ran into a storm and the portholes were almost underwater. The ship healed to about 45 degrees angle then righted itself. Never been in a storm like that (one) since. The Statue of Liberty was a most welcome sight after almost two years overseas.

Off the ship at the dock and we were met by the Red Cross with milk and donuts. Sure did taste good! (We) went to a holding area and the next morning when I got up, I had slept so hard, been on a boat so long that the floor of the barracks rolled and pitched for a few minutes!

We boarded a train and headed west for Indiana. Got off the train at Indianapolis and on a bus to Camp Atterbury in Southern Indiana.

My last day in the Army was November 12, 1945.
The Awards and Medals are:

Member American Order of the French Croix de Guerre
Wearer of the French Liberation Medal
Good Conduct Medal and Ribbon
E.T.O. Medal and ribbon with Bronze Arrowhead and seven (7) Campaign Stars
Victory in Europe Medal and Ribbon
European Occupation Medal and Ribbon, Germany
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon and Wreath

[NI1955] Doug Kitchel Dies
by Todd Wellington

The man known as much for his commitment to civic improvment as he was for his prominent businesses Douglas B. Kitchel of Barnet, died at home on Saturday afternoon. He was 82.

"In my judgment, he was perhaps the most publicly spirited citizen in our area," said longtime friend and colleague John Downs of Lyndon.

Kitchel, a former state senator, moved to Vermont in 1938 from Old Greenwich, Conn. He was prominentTy known as the longtime owner of the well-known Passumpsic dairy and creamery, Kilfasset Farms.

He also owned Burke Mountain Ski Area for 25 years. He purchased Burke in 1964 and is credited by many for saving the struggTing ski area. I don't think it would have been revived without him," said Downs.

Kitchel served on numerous civic boards such as the Northeast Vermont Development Association and Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital, where he was a past board president.

He was also very active in several community organizations, most notably, the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury where he served as a trustee and museum fellow. "It was his great passion," said another longtime friend and colleague Graham Newell.

According to Charles Browne, executive director of the museum, Kitchel spent "literally thousands of hours" working on behalf of the museum s goals. "He was a problemsolver, we'll miss that leadership," said Browne. "He thought virtually any problem could be solved."

As a state senator in the 1960s, Kitchel was described by Downs as a "good environmentalist," a trait he continued to exercise by
undertaking projects such as the Kingdom Trail project in Lyndon and Burke.

But it was Newell who paid Kitchel perhaps the highest tribute possible. "He came here and soon became, what I call, a true Vermonter," said Newell.


Much Of Trail System Named For Doug Kitchel
by Kristen Miller

The Northeast Kingdom will soon be the host of an interconnecting web of trauways for bikers, cross country skiers, horseback riders and sightseers. And on Sunday, it was announced that a major segment of the trails will be named in memory of Douglas Kitchel, in recognition of his longtime dedication and service to the project.

The announcement was made at a special brunch at the Inn at Mountain View Creamery in East Burke.

Kingdom Trail Association, a group that has been incorporated for about 18 months now, has started laying out and scouting parts of the trail.

"It's taken some time, but we're moving more rapidly, gaining momentum and we're glad to be started," said Bob Burnham, a trustee of Kingdom Trailways.

Directors of Kingdom Trailways envision the project as an innovative way to use the natural environment to generate tourism growth. They see it as an opportunity for both the economy and the environment around the Northeast Kingdom.

"Once the trail network is established and publicized, we think it will draw many people from outside the area, as well as being a great place for local people to hike and ski," said Burnham.

Burnham said eventually the group envisions a system of trails that extend all over the Northeast Kingdom. With East Burke at the hub of the system, trails would go from Lyndonville to East Haven, to the Victory Bog area, and to West Burke.

Burnham said the area already has about 75 km of cross country ski trails, many of which are available for year-round use. In addition, there are other trails along the Darling Hill Ridge. "We're making an effort to connect a lot of the existing trails," said Burnham.

Currently Burnham said Kingdom Trail is working on a portion to become a main trail on Darling Hill that would eventually link it to East Burke and Burke Mountain. He hopes to begin marking the main trail by the end of the summer.

Charlie Browne, curator of Fairbanks Museum and trustee of Kingdom Trails, explained East Burke serves as a good hub for the trail system because of its central location and parking capacity. There are also commercial amenities in the village.

In addition to serving as a tourist attraction, the trail system will serve to educate the public. Browne said he looks forward to working with and educating area youth by using the trail system. For example, Browne said the brochure Kingdom Trails plans to print will provide information about the plant and animal life around the area, as well as the geology and history.

John Morton, a former olympic biatholon champion, has been aiding in trail design. This includes laying out a portion of the trail, scouting them and then flagging a pathway.

Also, the National Park service has been helping out with the project. Jennifer Waite, of Woodstock, with the park service, has been contributing some technical and design services to the project.

Browne said Waite has been drawing on her own experience to help with grading and signs, recognizing which trail characteristics are suitable for what kind of use.

In addition to working on the design of the trail, the group is in the process of getting legal coverage as well as working with property owner. Some details to iron out include discussions about what kinds of trail markers to use, as well as the upkeep and budget.

Burnham explained Kingdom Trails is getting liability insurance which will protect the group and landowners.

"The specifics can get complicated, but the concept is very simple, it's a network of opportunities to experience the Northeast Kingdom," said Browne.

Though the budget is small, Burnham said interest and grant money is growing. Currently Kingdom Trails is using some grant money from the State of Vermont Forestry Park and Recreation Department, and with a small grant from the recreation trail fund.

In addition to grants, Burnham said the group is getting some support from a partnership with Conneticut River Valley, and that personal donations are always accepted. However, Burnham explained Kingdom Trails has gotten off the ground because of the volunteer effort.

"We rely very much on volunteers," said Burnham. Burnham said June 7 is National Trail Day, when people from all over the United States will be making an effort to improve and build trails. Anyone interested in volunteering on trail day to do maintenance or trail clearing can meet at East Burke Sports at 9 a.m.

Copyright 1997

The Caledonian-Record

[NI1986] Donald Kitchell - (Star-Ledger)
KITCHELL - Donald, of Basking Ridge, formerly of Whippany, on Oct. 1, 2003, husband of the late Claire B. Kitchell, loving father of Richard R. of Whippany and the Rev. Donald B. of Gilmer, Texas, also survived by five grandsons and four greatgrandchildren, son of the late C. Ross and Harriet M. Kitchell, brother of the late Ralph Ross Kitchell. A memorial service will be held at the First Presbyterian Church of Whippany, 494 State Highway 10, Whippany, on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2003, at 2 p.m. Those who wish may contribute in his memory to the Rotary Foundation, mailed to Morristown Rotary Club, c/o Jonathan Taylor, 2 Tulip Lane, Randolph, N.J. 07869. For more information go to www.bradley-braviak. com

[NI2012] KITCHELL, DAVID E
PFC US ARMY AIR FORCES
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 06/16/1945 - 01/21/1947
DATE OF BIRTH: 03/05/1927
DATE OF DEATH: 08/20/2001
DATE OF INTERMENT: 01/07/2002
BURIED AT: SECTION CT5-U ROW 400 SITE 405
NATIONAL MEMORIAL CEMETERY OF THE PACIFIC
2177 PUOWAINA DRIVE HONOLULU, HI 96813
(808) 532-3720

[NI2056] John KITCHEL(1) (2) (photo) was born on 1 Jan 1809 in Parsippany, New Jersey. He moved in 1851 in to Butcher
Creek, Warren County, Iowa. He died on 3 Mar 1860 in Palmyra, Iowa. He was buried in Palmyra, Iowa. He has
record identification number 324. (3) He has Ancestral File number 1.(4) He moved to Pennsylvania about 1814 and
to Knox, Ohio about 1825. He next moved to near Crown Point, Indiana in 1837 and in 1851 moved to Missouri near
Lexington. In 1851 he again moved to Butcher Creek, Warren County, Iowa, about nine miles from Indianola. His old place still stands (1963) near the spring and in the clearing which he made.

He was an abolitionist and his place on Butcher Creek was a station on the "Underground Railroad" which
transported runaway slaves north into Canada. In 1858 he traded for a farm adjoining Palmyra, Iowa, where he lived until his death. He was one of the organizers and leaders of the Methodist church at Palmyra and a man of highest character.

He was married to Esther PECK (daughter of Peter PECK) on 4 Apr 1833. Esther PECK (photo) was born on 9 Apr
1813 in New York City, New York. She died on 22 Oct 1910 in Upland, California. She was buried in Palmyra, Iowa.
She has record identification number 325. (3) John KITCHEL and Esther PECK had the following children:

[NI2058] Charles Wesley KITCHELL (photo) was born on 1 Mar 1840 in West Creek, Ind.. He died on 3 Mar 1918
in Little Rock, Arkansas. He served in the military 19 Oct 1861 to 24 July 1865 in College Springs, Iowa. (11)
He fisrt served in Co. G 15th Iowa Vol. Infantry under Capt. Romulus Hanks, to serve three years or until close
of war. He was discharged Dec. 6, 1863, by reason of re-enlistment as Veteran, Volunteer, as 1st Sergeant,
under Capt. Edward P. Byce, Co. G 15th Iowa Vol. Infantry. Was discharged at Louisville, Ky., by reason of
General Order No. 26. He served under Generals McPherson and O.O. Howard, 3rd Brigade, 4th Div., 17th
Corps. He participated in all the battles in which his regiment was engaged. Among them were Shiloh,
Corinth, Siege of Vicksburg, Lookout Mountain, the Atlanta Campaign, Sherman's March to the Sea, Surrender
of Johnston, and the Grand Review in Washington. He was wounded twice in battle.
He was buried in Palmyra, Iowa. He has record identification number 714. (3) He has Ancestral File number 5.
(4) After the Civil War he farmed and lived principally at Palmyra, Wintereset, and De Soto, Iowa. Two and a
half years before his death, he and his daugther, Arminta, moved to the Arkansas Valley in Arkansas where he
passed away.

He was married to Mary E. MORRIS (daughter of John MORRIS and Eliza MORRIS) on 29 Sep 1867 in Palmyra,
Iowa. Mary E. MORRIS was born in Jan 1844 in Indiana. She died in Dec 1909 in De Soto, Iowa. She has
record identification number 715. (3) Charles Wesley KITCHELL and Mary E. MORRIS had the following
children:

+18 i. Anna E. KITCHELL.
+19 ii. John John KITCHELL.
20 iii. Arminta KITCHELL(12) was born on 23 Aug 1873 in Palmyra, Iowa. She died in 1972 in Des
Moines, Iowa. (13) She has record identification number 1159. (3) She has Ancestral File number 22. (4) She
never married, but stayed home as a faithful daughter to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wesley Kitchell
and kept house for them during her mother's illness of about 15 years. After her mother's death she kept
house for her father until his death. During all those years she kept in touch with the various branches of the
family, passing along letters and family news, and in a way taking the place of Grandma Esther Kitchel, in
keeping members of the family in touch or at least knowing about almost all other members of the family.
Since her father,s death in 1918 she had been a practical nurse, busily employed, and had made her home
most of the time with her nepew and niece, Robert and Margaret Kitchell.

+21 iv. James Albert KITCHELL.
+22 v. Robert Morris KITCHELL.
+23 vi. Herbert L. KITCHELL.

[NI2114] Lived in Van Buren Twp, Montogomery County, 1900

[NI2147] Dentist in Dayton. Lived on Garden Road, Oakwood

[NI2148] Moved to Flordia.

[NI2154] BIRTH: may have been born Jan. 1881 in Morrison Township, Rice, Minnesota. Source: Marvin and Donna Miller, Crosby, Minnesota

[NI2211] In real estate business in Dayton with brother Virgil.

[NI2220] Notes for CATHERINE JANE CHAMBERS:
First name could be spelt with a K.

More About CATHERINE JANE CHAMBERS:
Burial: Glendale Cemetry, Cardington, Morrow Co., Ohio

[NI2227] Notes for CALLIE B. BROKAW:
One source has her first name as Carrie
There is a Carrie Brokaw in Morrow Co. Records:
Source; Morrow County, Ohio Vital Records
Name: Carrie A. Brokaw
Birthplace: Knox Co., Ohio
Birth: January 1842
Father: John A. Brokaw
Mother: Caroline Bush
Spouse #1: John bird
Spouse #2: Unknown
Children by 1st Marriage: Edith
Death: After 1881

[NI2228] Notes for DONALD WAYNE HEISHMAN, SR.:
DONALD HEISHMAN IS ACCIDENT VICTIM JUNE 27, 1958
Donald Heishman of La Crosse, Wisc., son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Heishman of Des Plaines, Ill. and former Brooklyn residents, was killed last Friday evening in a two-car collision near Winona, Minn. He was 21 years old.

Another man, driver of the second car involved, was also killed. His wife and three children escaped serious injuries.
Two young men riding with Heishman, were also injured, one seriously.

Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon in LaCrosse where burial rites were also held.
In addition to his parents he is survived by a brother, John 8, of Des Plaines, Ill.; a sister, Mrs. George (Doris) Riniker of West Salem, Wis., and his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George Lyman of Brooklyn ___

Those from Brooklyn attending funeral services for Donald Heishman Monday afternoon at LaCrosse, Wisc. included Mrs. George Lyman, Mrs. Hugh Dillon, Mrs. Harvey Jones, Mr. and Mrs./ Delmar Heishman, Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Heishman, Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Heihman, Darrell Heishman, Marlene Walter, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Heishman and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Byerly. Among others attending were Mr. and Mrs. Truman Reida of Lake View, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Dolmage and Mrs. Cloyd Lyman of Victor, Mrs. Dale Mohr and Merlyn Mohr of West Liberty and Larry Reida of Iowa City.

More About DONALD WAYNE HEISHMAN, SR.:
Burial: La Crosse, Wi.

[NI2231] Served with U.S. Army from August 26 to November 26, 1918 during WWI. General Secretary, Dayton YMCA. Lived in Kettering.

[NI2254] With the U.S. Army in Alaska, 1991

[NI2259] Notes for ROBERT ANDREW CHAMBERS:
1850 Census shows he was a farmer

[NI2270] Born at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Dayton, Ohio

[NI2280] Note: Stepson, first child of Margaret Whiteford and Martin Sturdivant. Robert used the name of Swadener. Robert Martin Sturdivant was six years old when Margaret and Paul were married. He used the name Swadener through his navy service in WWII. I (Patsy J. Swadener) he started using Sturdivant when he married.

[NI2333] In the Real Estate Business, Dayton, with brother Chester

[NI2339] Born at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Dayton, Ohio

[NI2349] He was a slaesman with M.L. Berry Co. in Dayton. In 1963 in lived in Harrison Twp.

[NI2371] Notes for BENJAMIN J. DAVIS:
OBITUARY
Benjamin J. Davis was born February 13th, 1829; died at his late home in Chester Township, Morrow County, August 16th, 1907. Aged 78 years, 6 months and 3 days. He was married to Catherine Potts November 19th, 1854. They lived happily together until October 11th, 1880, when his companion was called away by death. On January 21, 1882, he married Ellen J. Chambers, who with a host of riends are left to mourn his departure. He was converted and united with the Chester Baptist church at 12 years of ag. In August, 1855, he with 42 others, took their letters from the Chester church and organized the "Harmony" Baptist church, where he remained a faithful and consistent member until death. He was deacon of the church for over ten years. After nearly 67 years of faithful Christian service the Master called him to his reward. By his death his wife will feel the loss of a kind husband, the community a good neighbor and the church a strong member. The funeral services were held at the Chester Baptist church August 18, and the body laid to rest in the adjoining cemetery. The service was conducted by his pastor, J. Vuker and assisted by pastors, W. H. Bedell, of Hopewell and J. T. Lewis of Chesterville.

THE MORROW COUNTY INDEPENDENT CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1907 VOL. XXXVI NO. 32 PAGE 5
PENCILED PARAGRAPHS
B. J. Davis, aged seventy-eight, died Friday evening at his home in the southeast corner of Chester township. The funeral was Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, followed by burial in Chester cemetery. Mr. Davis was one of the pioneers of that section and was born in Wales, his people coming to America and settling at an early date on the farm on which Mr. Davis died. He was the last surviving member of the family and leaves no children. He leaves a widow.

AUGUST 29, 1907 page 8
One of Chester townships oldest citizens, B. J. Davis, died last Friday evening at his home, two miles southwest of Chester church, as a result of being overcome in the hay-field a week ago. The funeral was one of the largest ever held at Chester and was conducted by Rev. J. Tudor Lewis.

More About BENJAMIN J. DAVIS:
Burial: August 18, 1907, Chester Baptist Cemetery, Chester Twp., Morrow Co., Ohio

Marriage Notes for ELLEN CHAMBERS and BENJAMIN DAVIS:
They had no children.

THE MORROW COUNTY SENTINEL
A weekly nespaper, Devoted To The Interests Of Morrow County And The Republican Party
Mt. Gilead, Morrow County, Ohio, Thursday, February 2, 1882 Page 3
Joined Together
During the month of Jan. last, Probate Judge Matthews issued licenses to the following persons to be joined together in matrimony;
Benjamin J. Davis and Ella J. Chambers

[NI2374] Notes for FRANK KEYSOR:
From Dorothy Davis, we have his date of death as June 17, 1890. He never married.

Keysor--Died at the home of his parents in Warren Township, July 11, 1890, of typhoid malarial fever, Frank Keysor, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Keysor, aged 19 years, 5 months, and 3 days.

He was born in Brooklyn, Feruary 10, 1871, and his whole life has been spent in this vicinity where he has many friends. He has been a hard working and industrious boy and for some time before his death was driving dray team for Mr. Harry Mikirk in Brooklyn. His death was a surprise to most of his acquaintances many of whom had not heard of his illness. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J.S. Snyder assisted by Mr. B.F. Connell and the remains laid to rest in Brooklyn cemetery on Saturday afternoon, July 12, in presence of many friends. The family have the sympathy of all our people in this dark hour of their sorrw.

Brooklyn Chronicle July 18, 1890

From the journal of Maude Mae Keysor Lyman; Frank was born February 08, 1871

More About FRANK KEYSOR:
Burial: July 12, 1890, Brooklyn Cemetery, Brooklyn, Poweshiek Co., Iowa

[NI2375] Notes for ELLEN J. CHAMBERS:
Will Record 11 page 387
Ellen Davis died Sept. 9, 1932
next of kin
niece-Ella Higgins
cousin- Clark Higgins Mt. Gilead, Ohio
cousin- Mrs. H. C. Adams 215 E. Reed, Bowling Green, Ohio
cousin- Edgar Callahan Cardington, Ohio
cousin- Charlie Hathaway Cardington, Ohio
cousin- Mettie Freeman De Moines, Iowa
cousin- Mrs. Tamer Keysor Brooklyn, Iowa
cousin- Dillie Davis Cardington, Ohio
cousin- John Gibbons Marengo, Ohio
cousin- See Hathaway Galion, Ohio

More About ELLEN J. CHAMBERS:
Burial: Chester Baptist Cemetery, Chester Twp., Morrow Co., Ohio

[NI2378] By Kathryn Swadener-Smith - Oct 22, 2000

The Swadener-Smith family has a new member! Madeline Diane Smith was born on 10-22-00 in Indianapolis, Indiana at 7:15 pm. 7lbs 13 oz and 21 1/2 inches long. Proud parents are Scott and Lynell Smith, Scott is my oldest son.

[NI2382] Notes for Attilio La Monica:
Attilio La Monica was born September 22, 1884, Cerda, Italy. He came to the United States, sailing from Palermo, Sicily on the vessel Lazio on April 27th, 1906, landing in Ellis Island on May 14, 1906.

The Petition for Naturalization, which is dated October 28, 1912 states that the family lived in Avon, Livingston County, New York at the time.

Marriage Notes for Attilio La Monica and Maria Civiletto:
Attilio came to the United States on April 27, 1906 on the vessel Lazio and arrived Ellis Island on May 14, 1906. The ship sailed out of Palermo, Italy.

Attilio's wife Maria came to (the) United States on the Vessel Pricipe Di Piemonte which sailed on April 10, 1908 from Palermo to Naples, Italy, arriving at Ellis Island on April 24, 1908. She was accompanied by her sisters-in-law Antonina Lamonica (Cipolla), Maria Lamonica, and her two children Cruciano and Sarafina. They were detained by immigration until her husband Attilio Lamonica picked them up and brought them to Mount Morris, New York.

Source documents are Passenger list and detained Alien list of ship Principe Di Piemonte from Mormon Microfilm # 1399780. The Peton for Naturalization and The Declaration of Intent of Attilio Lamonica copied from the Livingston County Historians Office in Geneseo, New York.

[NI2386] In 1926/27, before her marriage she lived at home and worked as a proofreader with the Rike-Kumler Company.

[NI2402] Notes for RICHARD DEAN DOLMAGE:
At the time of his mother's death he was living in Victor, Iowa.

[NI2411] All three are buried in David's Cemetary, Dayton, Ohio. He was a paper company timekeeper and resided on Kenmore Ave. in Dayton

[NI2417] Notes for JOSIE M. FOGLE:
From Margurite Davis have her last name as Fogie.

[NI2448] Notes for DOROTHY JANE LYMAN:
DOROTHY J. HEISHMAN
Dorothy J. Heishman, 84, of LaCrosse, Wis., died Thrusday, July 27, 1995 in Lutheran Hospital.
Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Saturday, July 29, in the Schumacher-Kish Funeral Home in LaCrosse. The Rev. Michael L. Frandsen officiated. Burial was in the Oak Grove Cemetery.

She was born on July 12, 1911, in Brooklyn, to George and Maude Kaiser Lyman. She married E. Wayne Heishman on October 10, 1931in Sioux Falls, S. D. Dorothy was a rural elementary school teacher in the Brooklyn area for many years. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in LaCroasse.

In addition to her husband, E. Wayne, she is survived by a daughter, Doris (George) Riniker of West Salem, Wis., a son, John (Kathy) Heishman of Des Plaines, Ill.; five grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and three sisters, Marie Hladky of Fort Myers, Fla., Hazel Dolmage of Victor, and Bernice (Truman) Reida of Lake View.

She was proceded in death by a son, Donal Wayne, in 1958; a sister, Thelma Mohr; and two brothers, Cloyd and Cecil Lyman.

More About DOROTHY JANE LYMAN:
Burial: July 29, 1995, Oak Grove Cemetery, LaCrosse, Wi.

[NI2468] Notes for HANNAH ANN CHAMBERS:
The Morrow County Independent. Thursday, April 6, 1905
Mrs. H. B. Clark Dies Thursday and Buried at Cardington.
Hannah Ann Clark, wife of H. B. Clark, died Thursday of lung trouble. She was about 74 years old and had been married for fifty years. Funeral services were held Saturday at Cardinton in the M. P. church, conducted by Rev. Benjamin Tulloss of Mt. Vernon. Another of the pioneer christian ladies has passed to her reward.

Farther down the page--H. B. Clark will have a sale Saturday.

From a hand written journal of Maude Mae Keysor; she has Nancy Chambers-Clark as a sister to her mother, Tamar Chambers Keysor.

More About HANNAH ANN CHAMBERS:
Nickname: Nancy

[NI2483] Notes for MARY ELIZABETH CHAMBERS:
Delaware Co. is now Morrow Co.
Mary died at the home of her son, Clark Higgins

DEATH OF ELIZABETH HIGGINS
The death of Mrs. Elizabeth Higgins, aged 77 years, occurEd last Wednesday at the home of her son, Clark Higgins, near Bryn Zion, after a long illness. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Chambers and ws born July 7, 1845. The deceased is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Davis, of north of Mt. Gilead and a daughter at home, one sone, Clark and one step son, C. O. Higgins.
The funeral services were held last Friday at one o'clock at Bryn Zion.

More About MARY ELIZABETH CHAMBERS:
Burial: May 19, 1922, Bryn Zion Cemetery, Morrow Co., Ohio

[NI2508] Notes for BERNICE RUTH LYMAN:
Dorothy Davis has Bernice's birth date as September 26, 1915.

[NI2526] To all my friends and family:

Just to let you all know that my grandson Curtis and his Carrie Thompson have a new son. Caleb Christopher Thompson. He was born March 8th, 2:45 am, at the Aberdeen Hospital. He weighed in at 7 lbs 4 oz and is 20 inches.

Yes I know, this makes me a "Great-Grandmother." I plan to go to Raymond to see this little bundle of joy Thursday evening. I can't wait to hold him and give him a big love.

Gloria

[NI2549] Rodney graduated and may be living in Colorado.

[NI2551] Douglas graduated from high school and joined the army.

[NI2554] E-mail received on 12/20/2003

Hi there,

This is Cassondra Lynae Adams.

There is some information that you might be lacking in regards to my families records...

My mother Georgianna Marie Adams didnt pass away on 9-6-95. The correct date of her death was 9-5-95 of a rare blood disease and all related complications upto and including multiple surgeries and the main cause of death was cardio-pulmonary arrest due to removal of respiration apparatis...

More about me. My name is legally now Cassondra Lynae Adams. You have me listed under my birth name which is not legal nor vaild, Curtis Lowell Adams... I would appreciate it if you changed your records to reflect the proper name. Secondly I am in transition of my gender from male to female and will be having GRS or gender reassignment surgery. So I would appreciate it if you changed the gender on my part of the album or that of my parents and their child (ME) to read female. I would appreciate it if this information were changed and not ammended, because I do not wish to be known by anyone as anything other than who I am now.

You may list the email address of thelemicvibe@aol.com if you wish to liist contact information for me.

If you would like I also can send a photo of myself for the family album. I would love to get to know some family both near and far, possibly building a healthy family relationship with those distant family members that wish to do the same.

Thank You,
Cassi Adams
Cassondra Lynae Adams

[NI2556] Janice graduated from high school and married.

[NI2560] Daniel attended college.

[NI2561] Notes for GLORINE FAY LYMAN:
As of Aug. 15, 2002, she was still living on the farm in Iowa

[NI2564] Notes for RICHARD ELLIS BOWMAN:
SOURCE: THE VICTOR RECORD, APRIL 21, 1958 Victor, Ia.
ACCIDENT PROVES FATAL TO RICHARD BOWMAN
Sudden death came to Richard Bowman April 19, 1958 at the age of 29 years and one day. He was critically injured Friday morning while engaging in his work of plowing, when a rifle accidentally discharged, striking him on the right side of his face. Rushed to the University hospitals in Iowa City, he passed away 24 hours later at 11:05 a.m. Saturday.

Although the exact details of his accident will never be known, as he regained consciousness for only a brief time, it is possible that the .22 rifle that he had taken along to shoot ground squirrels may have jammed, as it was partially disassembled and there were pliers at hand as though he may have been working on the gun. He was found by his wife when she went to investigate why the tractor had ceased making periodic rounds. Ironically the accident occured on his birthday and a celebration had been planned by his family for later in the day.
Richard Ellis Bowman was born in Victor, Iowa, April 18, 1929, the son of Ellis Bowman and his wife Elpha nee Gerard. Richard lived with his parents in Victor and the past eight years he with his family lived on the farm four miles south of Ladora, Iowa.

He attended the Victor Public School and after graduating from high school here attended Iowa State college for one year. He served in the Army Signal Corps for one year and at the death of his father received his honorable discharge to take care of the farm.
Richard Bowman was united in marriage with Miss Glorine Lyman of Victor on June 1, 1951. This union was blessed with two daughters.
In 1953 he joined St. James Lutheran Church, where he was a faithful member until his sudden accidental death.
He was preceded in death by his father, Ellis Bowman in 1952.

Surviving are his wife, Glorine and two small daughters, Kathy and Christy; his mother, Mrs. Elpha Bowman; two sisters, Melba (Mrs. Donald Sexton), Newton, Iowa., and Lois (Mrs. Richard Daniels), Hamburg, Mich.; one nephew, three nieces, many other relatives, and many friends.

Funeral services were held at two o'clock Monday afternoon at the St. James Lutheran church with the Rev. C. H. Schroeder officiating. His remakrs were based on words of the Apostle Paul in his first letter to the Corinthians: "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to fave; now I know in part; but then I know even as also I am known." Hymns were played on the organ by Mrs. George Keller.
Flower bearers were Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pawlak and Mr. and Mrs. Menzo Davis. The pallbearers were Henry Begunck, Arthur Lang, Ronald Mohr, Richard Park, Johnny Pawlak and Ralph Keller. Burial was in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The community has lost a very estimable citizen by the death of Richard Bowman. He was industrious, devoted to his family, a lover of good music; he possessed a sunny disposition, and his character was above reproach. "Dick" as he was familiarly known, will indeed be sorely missed by everyone who knew him. The Record joins in extending deepest sympathy to the bereaved family.
CARD OF THANKS

Words cannot express our heartfelt thanks to our wonderful neighbors for doing chores, the people who visited us and brought food, to the women who helped prepare meals and to anyone else who has helped in any way; also for the floral offerings and memorial gifts. Your kindness and thoughtfulness during this time of our great loss shall never be forgotten.
Mrs. Richard Bowman, Kathy and Christy
Mrs. E. R. Bowman
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Sexton and Ann
Rev. and Mrs. Richard Daniels and family
Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd Lyman

[NI2565] Notes for DONALD WAYNE LYMAN:
Mr.and Mrs. Cloyd Lyman mourn the loss of a 10 1/2 pound boy which was born and passed away on Thursday, March 26. (1931) the parents are sincerely grateful to their friends and neighbnors for the many kindnesses and words of sympathy evoked by this bereavement.
SOURCE; The Victor Record, Thursday, April 2, 1931

[NI2568] Notes for CLOYD GEORGE LYMAN:
CLOYD LYMAN, 71 DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Services for Cloyd Lyman, 71, were Tuesday, Apr. 9, in St. James Lutheran church, Victor, with the Rev. Douglas Lenser officiating. Burial was in Victor cemtery.

Lyman's death occured Saturday, Apr. 6, 1974, at Grinnell General hospital, after an extrended illness. Congregational hymns for service were "Heaven Is My Home" and "Asleep In Jesus". Psalm 84 was read in unison. Organist was Jan McHarg. Casket bearers were Dave, Dean and Dennis Dolmage, Lawrence and Roy Merck and Merlin Schmidt.

Born Apr. 6, 1903, near Hartwick, the deceased moved with his family to a farm southwest of Carnforth, at an early age, where he attended Sunset No. 8 school.

From 1916-1928, he farmed until moving to Victor, where he had been employed at the Creamery, Standard Oil, Cities Service, Victor Produce and Yeisley Elevator, Amana Refrigeration.

He was baptized in his early twenties. June 19, 1928, he married Margaret Merck in a home ceremony, with the Rev. William Bartz performing the service. In 1929 he joined St. James Lutheran church and remained a member there.

Surviving are his wife, a daughter, Mrs. Robert (Glorine) Berry, Iowa City: two grandchildren, Kathy Warden, Ainsworth: and Christy Bowman, Iowa City: a brother and five sisters, Cecil Lyman, Victor: Mrs. Joe (Marie) Haldky, Ft. Myers, Flo.; Hazel Dolmage, Victor; Mrs. Dale (Thelma) Mohr, West Liberty: Mrs. Wayne (Dorothy) Heishmann, Des Plaines, Ill.: and Mrs. Truman (Bernice) Reida, Lake View.
Preceding in death was a son, in infancy.

The Lord is my shepherd: I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: He leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul. He leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me: thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies thou anointest my head with oil: my cup runneth over: Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.

IN MEMORY OF
CLOYD LYMAN
Born April 6, 1903
ENTERED INTO REST
April 6, 1974
SERVICES
Tuesday, April 9 at 2 o'clock at the St. James Lutheran Church with Rev. Douglas Lenser officiating.
MUSIC
Two songs, "Asleep In Jesus" and "Heaven Is My Home", sung by the Congregation with Hane McHarg organist.
FLOWERS CARED FOR BY
Mr.and Mrs. Walter Stoker and Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Seye
CASKET BEARERS
David Dolmage Lawrence Merck
Dean Dolmage Merlin Schmidt
Dennis Dolmage Roy Merck
Burial in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Victor

More About CLOYD GEORGE LYMAN:
Burial: I. O. O. F. Cem., Victor, Iowa

[NI2574] EROW, JACOB, farmer; was born in Greene Co., Ohio; he came with his parents to Perry Township in 1857. His father, Joseph Erow, died Dec. 15, 1869, and his mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Swadener, died March 30, 1872. The subject of this sketch enlisted and went into the rebellion with the 178th O. V. I.; he was in the battles of Cedar Flats and Shelbyville Pike. In one of the battles, he became separated from the ranks and came near losing his life; he was obliged to run across an open field, and, as he arrived at the thicket on the other side, many bullets cut the brush around him. Mr. Erow has held township offices, and is an Elder in the Disciple Church. Mr.
Erow was born Nov. 29, 1839 ; Adaline Cary was born Oct. 4, 1840; they were married Nov. 7, 1858 ; births-Joseph was born May 31, 1860; John, Sept. 17, 1862; Mary E., April 8, 1867 ; Samuel W., March 24, 1869; Marcelles H., June 28, 1874; an infant, Aug. 8, 1876.

[NI2578] Note: Thomas is an ordained Methodist minister.

[NI2580] During WWI he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, Field Artillery, serving at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, with Battery D, 134 Field Artillery and with 323rd Light Artillery at Fort Harrison, Camp Sherman, Alabama. Wife managed the Merle Norman Cosmetic Studio in Cincinnatti, 1944-1948. Lived in Victoria Place, Cincinnati.

[NI2596] On February 19, 1918, claiming to be 19 years of age, Harold enlisted in the Army to serve with Troop B, 17th Cavalry until March 1919, then with Troop M of the 1st Cavalry until discharge September 13, 1919. He had been promoted to PFC in November 1918 and to Corporal in July 1919. In 1956 he lived on Infirmary Road near Dayton, but later retired to Florida.

[NI2617] He was a music director and teacher, his wife a bookeeper. Lived on Negley Place in Dayton

[NI2637] He was a salesman withoffices in the Dayton Savings building and residence on David's Road.

[NI2644] Farmed in Va Buren Twp, Montgomery County, Ohio

[NI2652] STARKEY, Mary Ellen "Mick" (SWADENER); 69; Logansport IN>Coos Bay OR; 8-23-2000

[NI2664] She worked as a stenographer and bookepper with a collection agency and lived on North Riverdale and Fernwood Drives in Dayton.

[NI2668] Called "Libby" in 1890/91 Montgomery county Directory and in 1900 census.

[NI2687] Notes for Arthur Agnello:
Arthur died of Typhoid fever at a very young age. He is buried in St. Agnes Cemetery in Avon, Livingston, New York

[NI2688] Notes For Charles Agnello:
Charlie's favorite toast-------
Here's to Eve, the mother of our race, who wore a fig leaf in the right place.
Here's to Adam, the father of us all, who was Johnny-on-the-spot when the leaves began to fall.

[NI2700] Notes for CLAY E HATHAWAY:
According to headstone, his name was Glayde. He died at 4 months 7 days.

More About CLAY E HATHAWAY:
Burial: Harmony Chapel, Blackbird Cemetery

[NI2709] Birthday might be 8-5-1860

[NI2713] Peter Kohler was born 19 Mar 1843 in Wirthall twps, Lehigh Co., Penn, USA. He died 13 Jul 1897 in , , Ind, USA. His baptism was submitted. His endowment was submitted. Peter married Elizabeth Jane Swadner on 25 Jun 1867 in Center twps, Clinton Co., Ind, USA. Their sealing was submitted.

[NI2730] Notes: Came to the US at the age of 16, leaving his family behind. Settled in Perry, New York.

[NI2764] Merovech, King of the Salian Franks
Born: ?
Died: 456 Father: Clodio, King of the Salian Franks
Mother: ?

Married (1): ?
Children:
Childeric I, King of the Salian Franks
King of the Salian Franks 447-456

Semi-legendary early Frankish king for whom the Merovingian Dynasty is named (Meroveus in Latin).

[NI2775] Notes for VALERIE JUNE DOLMAGE:
SOURCE; The Victor Record, Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1976, p. 3
OBITUARY
VALERIE COPE DIED DEC. 23 IN COLORADO
Valerie June Dolmage, the daughter of Wayne and Hazel Lyman Dolmage, was born at her parents home south of Victor on May 22, 1929. She was one of 11 children. Valerie grew to womanhood in this area, graduating from the Victor High School in 1946.

Following her graduation from high school she attended the Iowa State Teachers College at Cedar Falls and later taught school in rural Iowa county. In 1956 Valerie became a resident of Broomfield, Colo. This had been her home since that time.

It was in Denver, Colo. at St. Anthony's hospital that she entered into rest after a lingering illness on Thursday, Dec. 23. She had attained the age of 47 years, 7 months and 11 days. Valerie was preceded in death by her father, Wayne, and one sister, Colleen.

She leaves to mourn her passing her three children, Sherry, Mrs. Steve Boudreau of Broomfield, Colo; Michael Cope and Kelly Cope, also of Broomfield; her mother, Mrs. Hazel Dolmage of rural Victor; her brothers and sisters, Thelma, Mrs. Harold richardson of Schenectady, N. Y.; Vern of San Diego, Calif; Lillian, Mrs. Lowell Tiller of Port Townsend, Wash; Sheilia Cerveny of Cedar Rapids; David of rural Victor; Dennis of Grundy Center; Laura, Mrs. Robert Reed of Albany, N.Y.; Daisianna, Mrs. Chris Dodds of Burlington; and Dean of rural Victor.
Also surviving are her two grandchildren, David and Jennifer; several aunts and uncles, nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends.

Funeral services were held on Monday, Dec. 27, at 1:30 p.m. at the McAninch-Fremming Chapel in Victor with Rev. Jack Weida, Pastor of the Victor United Methodist church, officiating. Two organ solos, "The Lord's Prayer" and "Beyond the Sunset" were played by Mrs. William Alexander. In care of flowers were Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Shine and Mr. and Mrs. Roy LeBeau.

Concluding services and burial were in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Victor with Richard Rohrer, Russell Fetzer, Wayne Farnum, David Bastian, and Bruce Feller serving as casket bearers.

More About VALERIE JUNE DOLMAGE:
Burial: December 27, 1976, Victor Cem., Victor, Iowa

[NI2781] Born: St. Elizabeth Hospital

[NI2807] Notes for DENNIS GEORGE DOLMAGE:
At the time of his mother's death he was living in Grundy Center, Iowa.

[NI2809] Notes for LAURA LEA DOLMAGE:
At the time of her mother's death she was living in Voorheesville, New York.

[NI2810] Notes for DAVID WAYNE DOLMAGE:
At the time of his mother's death, Apr 29, 2001, he was living in Victor, Iowa.

[NI2811] Notes for NANCY JEANNE PLAGER:
Her last name could be Plegar

[NI2818] People of Praise Florida

Bob Fesler

Robert K. Fesler, 82 years old, of Mesa, died peacefully on - May 2, 2003, looking forward to being with Jesus.

He was born on January 4, 1921 in Cleveland, Ohio, and grew up in Terre Haute, Indiana. After high school he moved to South Bend, Indiana and was employed as a machinist at the University of Notre Dame for most of his career.

On June 14, 1968 he married Jane Powell, who survives. He and Jane moved to Mesa in 1991.

Bob leaves three children, Anne Fesler-Butts of Apache Junction and sons Terry and Jonathan Fesler of Three Rivers, Michigan. Sons Frederick and David Fesler precede him in death.

He also leaves stepdaughter, Rachel Lathrop of San Francisco and stepsons, Michael Swadener of South Bend, Patrick Swadener of Los Osos, California, and Thomas and Daniel Swadener of Tempe, plus 10 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.

Bob was interested in people, loved music, both classical and jazz. He was known for his great sense of humor and his angelfood cakes.

There will be a visitation on Monday (May 5) at Melcher Mission Chapel, with services on Tuesday, 10:00 am at Victory Lutheran Church in Mesa. Memorial gifts may be given to Victory Church for the Wellness Program.

Published in the Arizona Republic on 5/6/2003.

[NI2861] Notes for Guiseppi La Monica:
Arrived on the vessel San Giovanni, May 25, 1909, ships manifest Line 23, page Unknown.
His brother Attilio Lamonica P.O. Box 80, Mount Morris, New York picked him up at Ellis Island location.

[NI2881] Notes for WAYNE PRICE DOLMAGE:
Obit
LIFELONG RESIDENT DIES SUDDENLY AT FARM HOME 1963
Services for Wayne Dolmage were held from First Methodist church in Victor, Tuesday, Dec. 31 at 2 p.m. Rev. Robert Bowers officiating. Mrs. G. W. Ricke played two organ solos, "The Lord's Prayer" and "Beyond the Sunset".

Mr. and Mrs. Roy LeBeau, Mr. and Mrs. Laverne Fullmer and Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Shine took care of the flowers. Pallbearers were Cecil Schrader, Delamer Shultz, Howard Meldrem, Al Fontinel, Bruce Feller, Alden Shultz, Floyd Sleeuwenhock and Wayne Mathews. Burial was in the I.O.O.F. cemetery beside his daugher, Colleen.

Wayne P. Dolmage, eldest son of Frank and Mabel Price Dolmage, was born on a farm one mile south of Victor on Jan. 2, 1905. He received his education in the Victor public school and graduated with the class of 1923? (hard to read) He also attended Iowa State College at Ames for one year.

He was baptized in the Congregational church at Carnforth and alter united with that church. After it was closed he attended the Congregational church in Victor until it was disbanded, then united with the First Methodist church, of which he was a member at the time of his death.

On Nov. 21, 1928, he was united in marriage to Hazel Mae Lyman and to this union 11 childten were born. After their marriage, they started farming one mile south of Victor, where he was born, and was living on the same farm when death came.

A short time ago he received his 25-year pin from the Pioneer sed corn company as their agent selling seed corn. His health had been falling for the past several years due to a heart condition and he passed away suddenly Saturday morning while doing his chores. He had attained the age of 58 years, 11 months and 26 days.

Wayne was a good husband and father, a friend and neighbor to everyone. He will be greatly missed in the home and the community where he had lived all his life.

He leaves to mourn his passing, his devoted wife, Hazel; then children; Thelma, Mrs. Harold Richardson of Johnson City, New York, Valerie, Mrs. Keith Cope of Broomfield, Colo., Vern of San Diego, Calif., Lillian, Mrs. Lowell Tiller of Port Townsend, Wash., Shelia Cerveny of Cedar Rapids, David, Dennis, Laura, Daisianna and Dean at home; 13 grandchildren' two sisters, Eunice of Davenport and Mrs. Forrest Breniman of Brooklynn, two brothers, Earl and Max of Victor; other relatives and many friends.

His parents and one daughter, Colleen, preceded him in death.

More About WAYNE PRICE DOLMAGE:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cem., Victor, Iowa Co., Ia.

[NI2883] Notes for SHEILA ANN DOLMAGE:
At the time of her father's death, 1963, she was listed in the obit as Shelia Cerveny of Cedar Rapids.
At the time of her mother's death, Apr. 29, 2001, she was listed as Shelia Varner of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Notes for CHARLES LEWIS CERVENY:
Ist husband

[NI2889] 1870 Census:

Routsong, Henry M/fm45m0
Clorinda43f0
Wm. A. /fm labor18m0
John F. /helps father13m0
Henry W.11m0
Elen A.10f0
Jacob C.8m0
Charles E.7m0
Alfaretta4f0
Elizabeth J.3f0
_______________________________________________________________________________________________Received in an e-mail from Lori Shoemaker-Hellmund.

My information agrees with yours about the Schwedner name. It is very interesting to note all the different spellings that evolved. Even within David's cemetery there are differing spellings.

An interesting little side note about David's Reformed Church. It was formed when the Evangelical Reformed Church that our families attended in Downtown Dayton split over whether or not to have services spoken in German. When the church split, the Creager family donated land here in Van Buren Township on which to build the new church. It was named after the Rev. David Winters who preached the services at the old church and became their new pastor. The church and the cemetery are very beautiful.

Clarinda and Henry are my great great grandparents. Their daughter Elizabeth Jane Routsong married Harry Edgar Norris on June 26, 1898 in Montgomery County, Ohio. She died on May 31, 1957 in Kettering, Ohio at 90 years of age.

Harry was born May 9, 1869 in Hagerstown, Frederick County, Maryland (where else?) He was the son of Joshua Hammond Norris and Alice. He died on April 11, 1934 in Montgomery County at 64 years of age. Harry was a carpenter and carriage maker.

Elizabeth and Harry had two children, Grace Naomi Norris Bailey. She was born February 9, 1906 and she died on October 7, 1995. She was married to Harrison Bailey.

Their son, Leland Vincent Norris (my grandfather) was born March 8, 1899. He married Gladys Margaret Marling on April 30, 1920 in Elkhart, Indiana. Gladys was the daughter of Ralph Elliott Marling and Margaret E. "Maggie" McBride.
Leland and Gladys had the following children:

Beatrice Jean Norris Crago: B April 30, 1922-D. December 1, 2003
Donald Leroy Norris B. April 23, 1924- D. September 18, 2001
Edgar Marling Norris B December 21, 1925
Leland Vincent Norris Jr. B June 13, 1929
Marilyn Jane Norris Shoemaker B January 3, 1932 (My mother)
Ralph David Norris B July 4, 1938

My parents are Marilyn Jane Norris Shoemaker and Estel Shoemaker, Jr. My brothers are Rick Jay Shoemaker and Brian Lee Shoemaker. I am Lori Jean Shoemaker Hellmund.

So, that is how is goes. Me, Marilyn Norris Shoemaker, Leland Vincent Norris, Elizabeth Jane Routsong Norris, Clarinda Swadner Routsong!

Now, how do you fit into the picture?

Also, my thought about the headstones: On Henry and Clarinda's Stones, the Big stone in the middle say's "Routsong" while the two stones on either side say "Henry" and "Clarinda". Samuel and Caroline's stones are set up in much the same way, except that all the writing is on the large middle stone. It sits close to Henry and Clarinda's stones. I think the "mother" and "father" refer to Samuel and Caroline themselves. I am not entirely sure, but it seems to make sense.

__________________________________________________________________________________
From the Book - Rauenzahner to Routson, A Family on the Move page 141
Henry was his parent's first child born in Ohio, just after their arrival on Montgomery County. His wife, whom he married seven weeks after his father's death, was a sister of his sister's Caroline's husband Samuel SWADENER, neighbors on an adjoining farm. Henry and Clarinda were married for 66 years and carried on the family farm which in 1870 had been valued at $10,000.00 in addition to a personal estate of $1,580.00.

An interesting letter written by Henry in late 1911 to Mrs. Mettie Herrington is in the possession of his granddaughter #1b3a.3e6-Harriet Routsong-NUTT. In it he noted that his wife, whom he called May, was able to visit their daughters, but only when they took her over in a buggy. He spoke of remodeling of farm buildings by Mrs. Bradford, who is living in Mrs. Herrington's old home, presumably near them. President Patterson of the National Cash Register Company in Dayton had given them a tour of the plant, having transported there by an "outtomobile" and giving them a dinner. Patterson had asked Henry to prepare a list of the first settlers in Van Buren Twp inasmuch as Henry believed himself then the oldest man in the township, where he was born and where he spent his entire life.
___________________________________________________________________________________My maternal great great grandparents were Henry Mathias and Clarinda Swadner Routsong. They owned a farm in Van Buren Township, near Dayton and Lebanon Pike.
The following article about Henry and Clarinda and their family appeared in The Dayton Daily News on Tuesday, August 4, 1908.

Eighty-Four years old and has never been on a railroad train
H.M Routsong, Oldest Representative of a Family of Four generations. So Pleased with His Home Surroundings That He Never Went Farther Away From His Home Than He Could Walk or the Old Family Horse Carry Him

The above picture, showing the representatives of a remarkable family of four generations, is reproduced from a photograph taken by The Daily News staff photographer at a reunion held Sunday. In the lower row are Mrs. and Mrs. William (this was an error) Routsong, aged 84 and 82 respectively, and their great-grandson, Harold Routsong. In the upper picture are shown William and Lester Routsong, son and grandson of the venerable couple.

Representatives of four generations of the Routsong family were gathered Sunday at the home of Lester Routsong, Rural Route No. 2 on the Dayton and Lebanon Pike. In the party were the oldest representatives, H.M. Routsong and wife Mrs. Clarinda Routsong, aged respectively 84 and 82; their son, William A. Routsong, aged 56, their grandson, Lester Routsong, aged 30, and great-grandson, Harold Routsong, aged 8. This was the first occasion for the assembling of the entire family together for a number of years.

H.M. Routsong, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Routsong, was born near Dayton and has lived on the same farm for the past 84 years. His parents came to Ohio when it was almost a backwoods, from Middletown, MD. Evidently, the family is what is commonly termed long-lived for he has two sisters, Mrs. Caroline Swadner and Mrs. Rebecca Emmert, who are aged 82 and 80 respectively. At the age of 26, he was married to Clarinda Swadner. Eight children were the result of this union, of which only three survive.

For a man of his years, Mr. Routsong is most spry and active. He works daily on the farm. To rusticity and the quiet of farm life, Mr. Routsong is peculiarly wedded, and this same feeling has been instilled in most of his descendants. When a very young man he rode to Dayton to see the first train. While he has, of course, observed several trains since, he has never in his life ridden in a railroad coach.

A conclusive proof of his unusual strength was demonstrated about 8 years ago when he was on the petit jury. During that time he made 37 trips to the city on foot.



[NI2925] Notes for HAROLD DALE MOHR:
POWESHIEK CO. BIRTH RECORD BK 3 (1897-1908) P327
Name of Child: Herold Dale Mohr
DAte of Birth: March 8, 1900
Place of Birth: Lincoln Twp.
Mother: Mary Coats? (hand-writing was difficult to imterpret on this name.)
Father: Frank J. Mohr
From Marilyn Holmes

[NI2935] 1850 Census of Cedar County, IA p.90b
Continued from Page 90
Continued on Page 91
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Abstracted by Paul Dickey, ©1998

Transcribed from the National Archives and Records Administration Federal Population Schedules for the7th Census of the United States in 1850.
Submitted by Paul Dickey, July 27, 1998.

The US GenWeb Archives provide genealogical and historical data to the general public without fee or charge of any kind. It is intended that this material not be used in a commercial manner.

Both above notices must remain when copied or downloaded.
dickey@netins.nett

LN Line Number Family appeared on
HN Dwelling houses numbered in the order of visitation
FN Families numbered in the order of visitation
LAST NAME, The Name of every Person whose usual place of FIRST NAMEabode on the 1st day of June, 1850, was in this family
RACE Color (white, black or mulatto)
OCCUP. Profession, Occupation,or Trade of each Male over 15 years of age
VAL. Value of Real Estate owned
BIRTHPLACEPlace of Birth, Naming the State, Territory, or Country
MRD. Married within the year
SCH. Attended School within the year
R/W Persons over 21 yrs of age who cannot read &write
DDB Whether deaf & dumb, blind, insane, idiotic, pauper, or convict.


CENSUS YR: 1850 STATE or TERRITORY: IA COUNTY: Cedar DIVISION: Rochester Twp. REEL NO: M432-182 PAGE NO: 90b
REFERENCE: 2 Sep. 1850 by J. H. Robinson, Ass't Marshal
=========================================================================================================================
LN HN FN LAST NAME FIRST NAME AGE SEX RACE OCCUP. VAL. BIRTHPLACE MRD. SCH. R/W DDB
=========================================================================================================================
1 131 131 Dillen Pauline 9 F Iowa X
2 131 131 Dillen Jeremiah 5 M Iowa
3 131 131 Dillen John 2 MIowa
4 131 131 Porter Mary 13 F Ind. X
5 132 132 Swadener Abraham 45 M Cooper 300 Ky.
6 132 132 Swadener Mary 35 F Ohio
7 132 132 Swadener Mary A. *. 16 F Ohio X
REMARKS: init. prob. S.
8 132 132 Swadener LouisaE. 13 F Ohio X
9 132 132 Swadener Lucy 10 F Ohio X
REMARKS: Ohio written beside blotch
10 132 132 Swadener Sara J.8 F Ohio X
11 132 132 Swadener Jas. N.5 M Ohio
REMARKS: spot covering Att. School column
12 132 132 Holland Wm. J. 23 M Cooper Md.
13 132 132 Fisher John 22 M Farmer Ohio
14 132 132 Vanderburgh Isaac 30 M Brickmaker Canada
15 133 133 Standley Thos. 27 M Miller 100 Canada
16 133 133 Standley Rebecca 26 F England
17 133 133 Standley John2 M Iowa
18 133 133 Standley Maria 1/12 F Iowa
19 133 133 Adams Maria 57 F England
20 133 133 Weaver Benj. 17 M Miller Pa.
21 133 133 James Wm.38 M Wagon Maker 150 Wales
22 134 134 Patten Wm. 50 M Laborer Del.
23 134 134 Patten Lydia 48 F Pa.
24 134 134 Patten Isaac D. 18 M Laborer Pa.
25 134 134 Patten Rebecca A. 13 F Ohio X
26 134 134 Patten Mary M. 8 F Ohio X
27 134 134 Patten Esther E. 3 F Iowa
28 135 135 Morris William 53 M Farmer 35 N. C. X
29 135 135 Morris Catherine 48 F N. C. X
30 135 135 Morris John 18 M Farmer Ind.
31 135 135 Morris Albert 16 M Farmer Ind.
32 136 136 Dewell Saml. 31 M Carpenter 700 Ohio X
33 136 136 Dewell Martha A 28 F Ind. X
34 136 136 M*** Eliza E. 4 F Iowa X
REMARKS: blotch on last name
35 136 136 Walker Harvey 30 M Carpenter Ind.
36 137 137 Peyton William 26 M Carpenter 112 Ireland
37 137 137 Peyton Ellen 25 F Pa. X
38 137 137 Peyton Henry 9 M Pa. X
39 137 137 Peyton Alexander 5 M Pa. X
40 137 137 Elea*** Elizabeth 74 F Pa. X
41 138 138 Coffey Garret *. 30 M Merchant 1,000 Ohio
REMARKS: * T. or S., Hotel written under dwell. col. on next page
42 138 138 Coffey Martha J. 23 F Ohio
REMARKS: Hotel written under dwelling column on next page

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Continued from Page 90
Continued on Page 91
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Back

[NI2944] Notes for EDGAR THEODORE CALLIHAN:
Edgar signed up when he was 27 and served 3 years.

R. CONAWAY, PUBLISHER CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1939, VOL. LIV, NO.2 PAGE 6
OBITUARY
Edgar Theodore Callihan son of Theodore and Catharine Chambers Callihan, was born november 7, 1870, in Morrow County, and passed away early Sunday morning, January 8, 1939, in his home on Park Avenue, Cardington, age 69 years and 2 months.
Mr. Callihan was united in marriage with Eva Mae Shaw, Aug. 27, 1913.
On January 21, 1934, he was baptised in the St. Paul Lutheran church, Cardington, by Rev. Henry young, who was pater at that time.
Mr. Callihan had been in failing health for almost two years. For this reason he retired from his business as a restaurant owner here in town. He took seriously ill a week ago Monday and passed away Sundat at 2:25 a.m. without a struggle he slipped away quietly in his sleep.
Ralph, a son by a former marriage, preceded him in death.
The deceased leaves his wife, two step-daughters, Mrs. Florence Faust of Cardington, and Mrs. Marie Wilson of near South Woodbury, and one half-brother, John Gibbons of Cardington, besides these he leaves to morn him many relatives and friends.

More About EDGAR THEODORE CALLIHAN:
Burial: Glendale Cemetery, Cardington Twp., Morrow Co., Oh.
Military service: Co. J. 3rd. O.V.I. Civil War

[NI2946] Notes for JOHN MELVILLE GIBBONS:
COUNTY INDEPENDENT, CARDINGTON, OHIO THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1940 VOL. LX, NO. 21 PAGE 2
OBITUARY
John Melville Gibbons, son of Willis and Katharine Chambers Gibbons, was born in Morrow county, May 22, 1862. He departed this life on May 6, 1940, having reached the age of 77 years 11 months and 15 days.
In 1884 he was united in marriage with Sarah Belle Rinehart. To this union ws born seven children. He was preceded in death by his wife and four children: Rose Etta and Waldon, who died in infancy, and Lewis and Harley, who died after having reached manhood.
In 1900 he was united in marriage with Helen Viola Laycox, who remains. Others who remain are, his son, Ray Gibbons, of Cardington; two daughters, Imo Baker of Cardington and Pearl Beck of Galion; one stepson, thomas Laycox, of Mt. Vernon; 28 grandchildren, 22 great grandchildren; two nieces and two nephews. One brother and two half-brothers preceded him in death.
A precious one from us has gone,
A voice we loved is still;
A place is vacant in our home
That never can be filled.

THE MORROW COUNTY INDEPENDENT CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1940 VOL. LX, NO. 19 PAGE 9
WILL HOLD FUNERAL THURSDAY MORNING FOR JOHN GIBBONS
John M. Gibbons, 77, retired timber buyer, died Monday evening at his home on Cunard street after a month's illness.
he was born in lincoln township, May 22, 1862, son of Wello and Catherine Chambers Gibbons. mr. Gibbons was united in marriage with Miss Belle Rinehart in 1885. She preceded him in death. On February 18, 1908, he was united in marriage with Miss Helen V. Mann, who survives.
Besides the widow, he leaves two children, Mrs. Imo Baker of Cardington and Ray Gibbons of west of Cardington.
Funeral services will be held Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock in the Curl mortuary with Rev. F. H. Wasson officiating. Buril will be in Glendale cemetery.

More About JOHN MELVILLE GIBBONS:
Burial: Glendale Cemetery, Cardington Twp., Morrow Co., Oh.

[NI2964] Notes for LOWELL LEROY TILLER:
From an email from Dolores Hopkins on Nov. 26, 2001; she said that she had a call after Thanksgiving to say that he had died. He had MS for many years and died of a heart attack. She said that they lived in Port Townsend, Wa.

Sherry Bordeau has his middle name as Cameron

[NI2976] Received from Matt Swadener
FYI - the below is about my Grandmother, Phyllis Jean Wallis. You may know that she is technically not my blood relative, but she treated me better than anyone else. I believe she was born in Youngstown, Ohio, in 1924(?) on 24th February.

Grandmother (Wallis) is in a very poor state and probably on her death-bed. According to her son, she is in an incoherent state and unable to recognize anyone's presence as she had suffered a massive stroke. He says she has a Living Will, which dictates her wish to stay off medication, so they have not given her anything. She is in 2108 at Northside Hospital, but they are not sure how long she will be living.

With this announcement, I took immediate action by contacting my boss and travel agent, and I am going to get a flight on Tuesday 16th to Pittsburgh via Dallas on American Airlines. Right now I do not have the detail of the flight, such as departure/landing time, but I will probably stay with my Mother (in Pennsylvania, about an hour away from Youngstown) until Sunday 21st. More detail to follow once available.

I believe Gram knew you and liked you, so if you can go then please visit her. For those cc'd (who did not actually meet her), you are also very important people to me, so I am sending this to you as just FYI. Life is too short to never speak our mind, and I just wanted you to know while I can.
___________________________________________________________________________________
E-mail from Matt January 19, 2007
Gram's funeral went well, the service was beautiful, and it was a very trying time. I thank all of you for the support you have given me during this tragedy. Luckily, my brother (who I have not seen in 17 yrs) managed to arrive with his wife (Eric & Heidi); so we spent a day together. Right now I am in a state of shcck and unable to write much. Today I had to go to the house with Eric & Heidi, as they are Executors of the Will and I am listed in it too, to speak with her son. There was no trouble, luckily, but the house will need to be sold asap. I had to shift thru my loads of memorabilia there, and that just killed me. May God bless us all.


P.S. Gram (Phyllis Jean Wallis) died of a massive stroke.
She might have lived, but her own Living Will stated that
she not be put on any medication or life support.







If you do, please contact me at vaarasaarinen@yahoo.co.jp during the nextt
few weeks - it is more accessible for me to access than this account.

[NI2986] The first picture of Renee Leigh wastaken minutes after her birth, which was 3:20 am on June 17th, 2001, Father's Day. She weighed 8lbs 4ozs, was exactly 20 inches long, with lots of dark brown hair (almost black).

[NI2998] Notes for CLARK M. HIGGINS:
From information that was sent to me from Erin, ebay, the Morrow County Ohio Vital Records does not list him as a child of Enoch Higgins and Mary Elizabeth Chambers Higgins. Also in the Morrow County Ohio History of 1880, they only have 2 children listed, but he was born the year after.

More About CLARK M. HIGGINS:
Burial: Bryn Zion Cemetery, Morrow Co., Oh.

[NI3030] Buried in Queen of Heaven Cemetery, Pompano, Floridia

[NI3034] Notes for ESTELLA AGNUS PRASHAK:
The Lord is my shepherd:I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down green pastures: He leadeth me in teh paths of righteousness for his name's sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me: they rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies thou anointest my head with oil: my cup runneth over: Surely goodness and mercy shall bollow me all the days of my life and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.
IN MEMORY OF
ESTELLA A. LYMAN
Born October 12, 1904
ENTERED INTO REST
May 17, 1976
SERVICES
Saturday, May 22, 1976 at 2:P.M. at the McAninch Chapel in Vicotr, Iowa with Rev. David Hornok officiating.
MUSIC
Organist, Mrs. Don Alba and the tape recorded selections of "Something Beautiful" and "It Is No Secret"
IN CARE OF FLOWERS
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Gorsch
CASKET BEARERS
Russell Fetzer Darrell Cordes
Gary Bloome Tom Carlson
Don Alba Edward McAdam
With Burial in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Victor

More About ESTELLA AGNUS PRASHAK:
Burial: I. O. O. F. Cem., Victor, Iowa
Nickname: Stella

[NI3038] Obit Info: Date could be 6-22-1899

[NI3041] Born at Good Samaritian Hospital, Dayton, Ohio
Married: June 18, 1960 at Our Lady of Mercy Church, Dayton, Ohio

[NI3048] William Kenneth, died in an automobile accident during our trip to Lawton/Fort Sill, Oklahoma from Beech Grove, Indiana for our week-end
honeymoon before he was to report for Army duty after New Year's Day 1977. His car which I was driving went over a bridge during a snow storm. The small trailer we were towing slipped and threw the car into the guard rail. When the trailer broke loose the car went through
the guard rail and into a lake. The car rolled over several times crushing in the roof. My husband, Bill, was too husky to get out of the car through the broken car's front-door window. The divers found him 1/2 out of the car. The Army Survivor's Officer reported that he was caught at the waist belt-buckle on the drivers' side. I spent a number of days in the hospital recuperating. My in-laws made the arrangements for Pete's funeral and burial. He was buried with full military honors and dressed in the dress blues he was married in. He had completed over ten years of service to the USA. As Staff Sargent, he had intended to be a career man. Ft. Sill was a cannon training school. Among his effects were training manuals for nuclear war-heads. He had completed tours of duty in Japan and Germany. He enjoyed square dancing, photography and pen-pal letter writing or cassette-tape letters.

[NI3050] Notes for ROSSELLA (ELLA) HIGGINS:
H. C. and Rossella (Ella) had no children.
From Morrow Co. vital Records her year of birth was 1874

More About ROSSELLA (ELLA) HIGGINS:
Burial: Bryn Zion Cemetrey, Morrow Co., Ohio

[NI3074] Funeral Home Director in Oakwood.

[NI3105] Unmarried, Buried in David's Cemetary, Dayton

[NI3120] [Fagan.ftw]

Al I Remember about her was that she was very tall and very pale and wore long
dark dresses, and hats with a wide brim.

[NI3134] My dad, Harry Robert Swadener had a brother named John and 2 other siblings. They grew up in Logansport, Indiana. Their father died during WWII and their mother was said to be half american indian. His sister denyed it and John acknowledged being indian. Harry Robert served in WWII with the 36th Division (T Patchers). John served in the Navy. Their other brother Peewee also died in the war. That is all the information I have at the moment. If you think that Harry Robert is a part of your branch, please advise and I will print off your message for him. Thank you. Janet Fertig, Mrs.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
From an e-mail received Feb. 26, 2002

As to my immediate family, there is none to speak of except for my in-laws. We were married after Christmas 1976. My husband, William Kenneth, died in an automobile accident during our trip to Lawton/Fort Sill, Oklahoma from Beech Grove, Indiana for our week-end
honeymoon before he was to report for Army duty after New Year's Day 1977. His car which I was driving went over a bridge during a snow storm. The small trailer we were towing slipped and threw the car into the guard rail. When the trailer broke loose the car went through
the guard rail and into a lake. The car rolled over several times crushing in the roof. My husband, Bill, was too husky to get out of the car through the broken car's front-door window. The divers found him 1/2 out of the car. The Army Survivor's Officer reported that he was caught at the waist belt-buckle on the drivers' side. I spent a number of days in the hospital recuperating. My in-laws made the arrangements for Pete's funeral and burial. He was buried with full military honors and dressed in the dress blues he was married in. He had completed over ten years of service to the USA. As Staff Sargent, he had intended to be a career man. Ft. Sill was a cannon training school. Among his effects were training manuals for nuclear war-heads. He had completed tours of duty in Japan and Germany. He enjoyed square dancing, photography and pen-pal letter writing or cassette-tape letters.

His mother, Rhoda, and his brothers and sister, Glen, Paul and Mami, are in Pennsylvania. Glen and Mamie are currently on active duty in service for our country. His father died a short time before William died. It was a heavy blow to my mother-in-law. The only pictures I have are from my wedding that my parents kept. My mother's maiden name was Bowles. Grandmother's, Clara Catherine Coy's, maiden name was Walker. Grandfather Bowles was killed in the farm field when the tractor turned over on him. Jane was proud of him in that he invented things around the farm to make life a little easier and he moved them to the farm when the war started. It was easier to get the essentials if one were a farmer at the beginning of WWII.

Bob and I went to the Beech Grove Senior Citizens Center re-opening today. The members there were kind to us. They said that I reminded them of Jane. Daddy said I got my looks from my mommy. ;) They don't have Jane's name yet on the board of members who have died. Bob's going to shoot pool tomorrow with the new table bumpers that he donated in Jane's name.

Tomorrow, I have fun getting my Cardioverter Defibrilator checked. Three to four times a year since February, 1995, the Doctors have checked to make sure that my battery is working properly. Whee!

Well Cousin, this has been a long post. Hopefully, there is something among all these ramblings that will fill some of in the blanks for our family tree. Janet

[NI3166] Cremated, ashes scattered.

Ernie Paul Swadener, AKA Reed, lived with his birth mother's sister and husband, minat Erenie Reed. He attended Monrovia Schools through the 10th grade. Ernie quit high school and joined the navy, serving from 1951-1954, in the Korean War. Ernie was a pipe fitter/welder in the space program for 40 years. He was a member of the VFW Post # 1534. He was estranged from his children, not through his choosing. Death Certificate 37831.

[NI3172] No record of a marriage to Cruciano Cipolla who is presumed to be the father, but not confirmed.

[NI3182] Notes for HELEN VIOLA MANN:
THE MORROW COUNTY INDEPENDENT
W. R. CONAWAY, PUBLISHER CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1840 VOL. LX, NO. 28 PAGE 1
MONTH'S ILLNESS FATAL TO MRS. JOHN GIBBONS, 83
Mrs. Helen Viola Gibbons, 83, widow of John Gibbons, died Sunday noon at her home on Cunard street after a month's illness with complications. Mr. Gibbons died on May 6.
She was a lifelong resident of Morrow county having been born at Williamsport, August 5, 1857, the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Lee Mann.
Mrs. Gibbons leaves a son Thomas Laycox, five grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren, and a sister, Mrs. Rachel Gibbs of Mt. Gilead.
Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the Curl mortuary with Rev. F. H. Wasson officiating. Interment was in Glendale cemetery.

More About HELEN VIOLA MANN:
Burial: Glendale Cemetery, Cardington Twp., Morrow Co., Oh.

[NI3207] Notes for HAROLD EMORY RICHARDSON:
HAROLD (RICH) RICHARDSON
Harold Emory (Rich) Richardson, 65, Schenectady, N. Y., died suddenly Dec. 30, 1988 at Ellis Hospital.
Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Jan. 3, 1989 at the Stanford United Methodist Church, Schenectady, where Mr. Richardson was an active member. Interment was at Memory Gardens, Colonie, N. U.

On Aug. 29, 1954 he married Thelma Dolmage in Victor.
Survivors are his wife, Thelma; one son, Lt. Wayne richardson, U.S.N.R.; and three daughters, Janelle R. Contento, Whiteville, N. C., LeAnne and Vallein of Clifton Park, N. Y.; his mother-in-law, Hazel Dolmage of Victor: and several nieces and nephews.
He was a brother-in-law of Vern, David, Dean and Dennis Dolmage, Lillian Tiller, Shelia Varner, Laura Reed and Daisianna Dodds.

More About HAROLD EMORY RICHARDSON:
Burial: January 03, 1989, Memory Gardens, Colonie, N. Y.

[NI3227] Managed Routsong Funeral Home in Oakwood, Ohio, earlier in partnership with brother-in-law George Fleming Bradford, Lived on Monteray Road, Oakwood

[NI3249] Mother Sharon didn't think he would be born this date. She thought she at least another day. Father Doug was working on a construction job in Ocean Shores, WA. Grandpa Swadener called him to let him know that his wife was on the way to the hospital at about 3:45 PM. Doug thought he had plenty of time. When baby was born at 6:50 PM Daughter Courtney, in attendence with her mother Barbara, called with the good news. Grandpa Swadener called Doug to give him the news. He had just finished working and was disappointed that he had missed the birth.

In a mixup at the hospital Kevin's surname was listed as Swadener vs Schwartz. If it never gets corrected Grandpa Swadener will be pleased.

[NI3253] n a note from Mom, she said that she met Dad in high school. He had quit school to go to California with his parents. Then after getting out of the service he went back to high school and was in the same class as her and graduated together. (per Dannell Hopkins, http://www.geocities.com/danni_74932/)

[NI3275] Clodio married UNKNOWN before 0411. (UNKNOWN was born before 0396 and died after 0411.)

Clodio, King of the Salian Franks
Born: ?
Died: 447 Father: Pharamond
Mother: ?

Married (1): ?
Children:
Merovech, King of the Salian Franks
King of the Salian Franks 426-447

Semi-legendary King of the Salian Franks and father of Merovech, founder of the Merovingian Dynasty. Called ", the Long Hair" or ", the Hairy" because of the length of his hair. From then on the Merovingians were called the "Long Haired Kings" and the cutting of a king's hair represented his loss of royal power.

According to legend his father was Pharamond (r.409-426), the first King of the Salian Franks after the departure of the Romans from Gaul. In history, Clodio was probably real. He lived in Thuringian territory, and ruled at the same time as the semi-legendary kings Theudemer and Richemer. All that is known of his reign is that he took the town of Cambrai from the Romans. He was succeeded by his semi-legendary son Merovech. (Unlike Merovech and Clodio, Childeric I, Merovech's son, was very real and cannot be considered fictional.)

[NI3285] Notes for DAISIANNA DOLMAGE:
At the time of her mother's death she was living in Burlington, Iowa.

[NI3307] Notes for THEODORE C. CALLIHAN:
1850 Census Monroe Co., Ohio has Theodore (16) PN 59a. Didn't find anyone else living with him.

THE MORROW COUNTY INDEPENDENT
CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1908 Page 1
THEODORE C. CALLIHAN
VETERAN AND WELL KNOWN CARDINGTON RESIDENT DIES OF PARALYSIS.
Theodore C. Callihan, who suffered several strokes of paralysis the past few weeks, died last Wednesday night. The funeral was held Friday at 10 o'clock at the home, east of Cardington, conducted by Rev. Mary E. Sipe. Burial was in Glendale.

Theodore C. Callihan was born June 1, 1834, in Morrow County, Ohio, and died Feb. 5, 1908, aged 73 years, 8 months and 4 days.
He was united in marriage with Catharine J. Gibbons June 12, 1869. To this union was born two sons, Edgar and Clyde, both of whom rside at Cardington.

At the age of twenty-seven he enlisted in Co. 1., 3d O.V.I., and served his country three years and was honorably discharged. Those left to mourn the loss of a kind and loving husband and father, are a wife and two sons; two stepsons, Wm. Gibbons of Sunbury, O. and John Gibbons of Cardington, who loved him as an own father; also a sister, Mrs. Lucy Barry of Cardington, and a half-sister, Mrs. Mary Thomas of Detroit, Mish.; eight grandchildren, one great-grandchild, and many friends and neighbors.

More About THEODORE C. CALLIHAN:
Burial: Glendale Cemetry, Cardington, Morrow Co., Ohio
Military service: 3rd. Ohio Inf., Civil War

[NI3341] Notes for TRUMAN WESLEY REIDA:
TRUMAN W. REIDA
Funeral services were held Monday morning, April 21, at Lakes United Methodist church in Lake View for Truman W. Reida, 86, of Lake View, who died April 17, 1997, at Loring Hospital in Sac City.

The Rev. Marcia F. Sangel officiated, and music was by organist Arline Hunter and congregational singing. Dorothy Oakman and Dixie Larson were in charge of floral arrangements.

Truman Wesley Reida was born Nov. 27, 1910, in Brooklyn, the son of Wesley and Jennie Bobka Reida. He was baptized at the Presbyterian church in Brooklyn. He was graduated from brooklyn Public Schools and attended Iowa State College at Ames, taking classes in Dairy Industry.

On Sept. 26, 1934, he married Bernice Lyman at her parents' home in Brooklyn. they lived in Brooklyn, williamsburg and Strawberry Point before moving to Lake View, where they had made their home for the past 48 years.

Reida had been employed at creameries in Brooklyn, Williamsburg and Strawberry Point. He and Keith Irwin were partners at Lakes Dairy in Lake View. After selling the dairy, Reida became magistrate for Sac County.

He was a member of the Lakes United Methodist Church, methodist Men's Club, Lake View Lions Club, Lake View Commercial Club, Masonic Lodge, Sac City, and Scottish Rite of Masonry, Sioux City. He retired from the Lake View Library Board in 1995, after serving as secretary for 30 years. He was active in church and community affairs, holding virtually every office in the Methodist church. He was on the Lake View School Board for many years, was president of the Commercial Club and served on the Sac County Board of Education.

He loved to play golf, was an avid reader and enjoyed going out to dinner and visiting with friends.
He was preceded in death by a brother, Amos, and an infant brother.

Survivors include his wife, Bernice; his son and daughter-in-law, Larry and Mary Reida of Waynesville, NC; his daughter, Linda Reida of Sylva, NC; two grandsons, Steve Reida of Bozeman, Mont., and Mark Reida of Lincoln, Neb.; and one sister, Lydia Reida of Brooklyn.
Source: Brooklyn Chronicle April 29, 1997

[NI3369] Notes for VERN LEROY DOLMAGE:
At the time of his father's death, 1963, he was living in San Diego, Ca.
At the time of his mother's death, Apr 29, 2001, he was living in San Diego, Ca.

[NI3384] according to family lore, she died of a "Broken Heart" after she was jilted by her fiance'

She died at age 21-8-14 of consumption. Sadly, just three months earlier a Montgomery Couty marriage license which had been issued Feb 19, 1887 to George O. Martin, was not returned.

[NI3389] Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery Point Loma, San Diego County, California

Kitchel, Milton P, b. 10/12/1922, d. 08/01/1991, SSGT USAAC, Plot: A-B C-1405D, bur. 08/07/1991, *

KITCHEL, MILTON P
SSGT US ARMY AIR CORPS
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 01/28/1943 - 10/23/1945
DATE OF BIRTH: 10/12/1922
DATE OF DEATH: 08/01/1991
DATE OF INTERMENT: 08/07/1991
BURIED AT: SECTION A-B SITE C-1405D
FT. ROSECRANS NATIONAL CEMETERY
P.O. BOX 6237 P.O. BOX 6237
SAN DIEGO , CA 92166
(619) 553-2084 (619) 553-2084

[NI3420] Child of JESSE GIBBONS and ADDIE UNKNOWN is:
i.ROBERT J.5 GIBBONS.

Notes for ROBERT J. GIBBONS:
THE MORROW COUNTY INDEPENDENT CARDINGTON OHIO MAY 30, 1940 NO. 22 PAGE 6
GRANDSON SAILS FROM SYRIA
Robert J. Gibbons, grandson of Mrs. John Gibbons of Cardington, sailed from Beirut, Syria, on board the S.S. Exeter bound for New York on May 5. Gibbons is a member of the foreign service of the United States department of state in Washington, D. C., and has for the past two and a half years been serving in the American legation at Teheran, Iran (Persia) in the near eastern division. Upon his arrival in New York about May 29, he plans to proceed immediately to his home in Galion, where he will spend several months wiviting his parents, friends and relatives.

[NI3450] I am forwarding a message below which I just received today. Thank you!!! by searching for Walter Setula's family I think I just found my grandfather's burial place as well....just by chance...I will know for certain when she sends me the dates. I don't know if this family is close to you enough for headstone photo's but I can get them for you if you like!

Kristie (Reynolds) Davis
sldavis@nwi.nett
_____________________________________________________________

Kristie;

I know how discouraging it can be trying to find relatives from the past. That's one reason we're attempting to put Claquato's information on the Rootsweb Tombstone project.

I did find Walter J. Setula, died 1978. He's buried in Sunset Memorial Gardens, the "Sacred" section, Lot 43, Space 1.

Lillie Alice Setula, died 1992. She's also buried in Sunset Memorial Gardens, the "Sacred" section, Lot 43, space 2.

The "Sacred" section lies south and to the west of the office. Bruce Craig would be the one to ask for directions.

There is Ida Johanna Setula, born 1871, died 1915 in the IOOF section.

I also found several with the name Setala, Leonard M. and May Theresa. Let me know if those names mean anything.

There is Donahoe, Augustine
Byrna M.
Kate
Paul
Reynolds, Albert
Caroli
Clara Dow
Elizabeth E.
William A.
Cora
Crawford
Joseph Coleman
Dye, Ernest L.
Lola

Until we finish the project, these are the names I have. If you want any further info on the above names, let me know.

Barbara Burgess

Claquato is two cemeteries in one, as both are under one leadership. Claquato Pioneer Cemetery is one and Sunset Memorial Gardens is the second section.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Walter J. SETULA


17 Nov 1893 - 1 Nov 1978

BIRTH: 17 Nov 1893, Glen Eden, Lincoln Creek, Lewis County, Washington
DEATH: 1 Nov 1978, Centralia, Lewis County, Washington
BURIAL: 6 Nov 1978, Sunset Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Chehalis, Lewis County, Washington

Father: John Erick SETULA
Mother: Ida Johanna ASUJA

Family 1 : Lillie A.

Glenn R. SETULA

I think that the Lillie A. you have listed above is my Lillie Alice (Carrithers) Setula.

This is probably a very distant relative to you. But I wanted to write and see if you could at least give me your source for this Walter Setula and Lillie??? or any other info you could have on this family....and I could go from there.

I was just in Pacific County, WA last week....(which is near Lewis County, WA). We were on a camping/seafood vacation and happened to stop into the historical society there....I found an article on Walter J Setula as he retired from the logging business. I can scan this article for you if you are interested in it for your records. I am not sure that he actually lived in Pacific County (he was not listed on the census there)

Thank you for his burial place. I was just at Claquato Cemetery....it is located off of Highway 6....on a whim....searching for the names Setula and Carrithers...it is a big cemetery and too big for me to walk through in a day so went to the caretaker who had the records but he could not find Setula or Carrithers...doesn't mean they weren't there though. I didn't look further than his records because the cemetery was so large .... I was just randomly searching the cemeteries I found in the area... with no idea that he was probably buried there. at the time I didn't pay attention to the other names of this Claquato Cemetery...

I just found your site today and was thrilled...although I wish I had looked here two weeks ago.... I looked up Sunset Memorial Gardens on the internet but the Lewis County genealogy society http://www.rootsweb.com/~walcgs/CEMETERY.HTM didn't have this cemetery information but they did say that Claquato is aka for Sunset Memorial Gardens....I wish I had looked a little harder on my own in that cemetery...rather than just trusting the cemetery records.....they didn't look too trustworthy...he looked in several different books and on his computer and didn't find it.

the genealogy society doesn't have the cemetery records for this cemetery either so not sure where you could have gotten his burial site...hopefully from a family member....according to Lewis County genealogy society:
"Claquato is (aka) Sunset Memorial Gardens (aka) Odd Fellows" Cemetery
_____________________________________________-
Here is a little of what I had.
LILLIE ALICE (CARRITHERS) SETULA b. 1893 in Chehalis, Lewis Co., WA
She is witness on the marriage certificate for Mary Elizabeth (Carrithers) and Joseph Coleman Reynolds and is the daugher of James Thomas Carrithers who is the brother of John Allen Carrithers who is Mary Elizabeth Carrither's father...making Lillie and Mary cousins. (Reynolds is my line sldavis@nwi.net ) Lillie married: Mr. SETULA

___________________________________________

this is from Crystal Collins c2dak@uti.com ::

19. LILLIE ALICE6 CARRITHERS (JAMES THOMAS5, WILLIAM PORTER4, THOMAS CALHOUN3, WILLIAM PORTER2, JAMES B.1 CARRUTHERS) was born January 18, 1893 in Chehalis, Lewis Co., WA, and died May 1992 in WA. She married WALTER J. SETULA December 29, 1923 in Snohamish Co., WA. He was born November 17, 1893, and died November 1978 in Centralia, Lewis, WA.



More About LILLIE ALICE CARRITHERS:

SS#: 537-38-5665 Recd Centralia, Olympia, WA



More About WALTER J. SETULA:

SS#: 535-05-5509 Recd Centralia, Olympia WA



Child of LILLIE CARRITHERS and WALTER SETULA is:

i. GENE RAY7 SETULA, b. September 30, 1926, Centralia, Lewis, WA.

(You have Glen R Setula for their son. I could be wrong with this name but we have Gene Ray Setula.)

My direct line is actually the Reynolds line but since the Setula / Carrithers part of the family lived in the Chehalis, Centralia, Dryad, Curtis Washington area I thought I would collect some information on them while visiting there. Do you have any other info on this family?

thanks
Kristie Davis
sldavis@nwi.nett

[NI3453] Copied from Ohio Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death
Document provided to author by Jeanne Yoakam

Reg. Dist. No.20
Primary Reg. Dist No.2000
State File No.035351
Registrar's No.137

1.Deceased - NameWilliam Lee Swaidner
2.Sex:Male
3.Date of Death:May 16, 1974
4.Race:White
5.Age:(a)86
6.Date of birth:November 23, 1887
7.(a)County of Death:Defiance
(b)City, Village, of Location of Death:Hicksville
(c)Inside City Limits:No
(d)Hospital or other Insitution:Community Memorial Hospital
8.State of birth:Indiana
9.Citizen of What Country:USA
10.Married, Never Married, Widowed, Divorced:Married
11.Surviving Spouse:Nellie Moore
12.(a)Social Security Number:302-18-9113
(b)Was Deceased ever in U.S. Armed Forces:Yes, WW1
13.(a)Usual Occupation:Teacher
(b)Kind of Business of Industry:School
14.(a)Residence - State:Ohio
(b)County:Defiance
(c)City, Village, or Location:Hicksville
(d)Inside City Limits:No
(e)Street and Number:316 West High
15.Father - Name:Sylvester Swaidner
16.Mother- Name:N/A
17.(a)Informant - NameNellie Swaidner
(b)Mailing address:Hicksville, Ohio
Part I.Death Was Caused By:
18.(a)StrokeApproximate Interval Between Onset and Death:12 hours
(b)Generalized ArterioselerosisApproximate Interval Between Onset and Death:3 years
19.(a)Autopsy:No
(b)n/a
20.(a)n/a
(b)n/a
(c)n/a
(d)n/a
(e)n/a
(f)n/a
(g)n/a
21.(a)Certification:Physcian:I attended the deceased from November 1972
(b)to May 16, 1974
(c)and last saw him alive on May 16, 1974
(d)I did view the body after death.
(e)Death Occurred: Hour: 8:00 PM
22.(a)Certification:Cornern/a
(b)n/a
23. (a)Certifer:Dr. Paul B. Kerr
(b)Signature:Paul B. Kerr, MD
(c)Date signed:May 19, 1974
(d)Mailing Address - Certifier:Dr. Paul B. Kerr, Bunnell, Hicksville, Ohio
24.(a)Burial:Burial
(b)Date:May 19, 1974
(c)Name of Cemetery or Crematory:Scipio Cemetery
(d)Location:Allen County, Indiana
25.Name of Embalmer:R. P. WeberLic No. 5550A
26.Funeral Director's Signature:R. P. WeberLic No. 4433
27.Funeral Firm and Address:Perkins - Reeb, Hicksville, Ohio 43526
28.Date Rec'd by Local Reg.May 28, 1974
29.Registrar's Signature:Mildred A. Snyder
30.Date Permit Issued:May 19, 1974
31.Signature of Person Issuing Permit:R. P. Weber Dist. No. 20
(d)Location:

[NI3557] Notes for JOSEPH FERDINAND HLADKY:
Obit for Joseph F. Hladky
Joseph Hladky died May 14, 1978 in Florida
Joseph F. Hladky of Fort Meyers, Fla. died in his home at the age of 81 years. He was a former resident of the Victor-Carnforth area, being a depot agent at Carnforth a number of years, and was also a lineman and radio repairman in the vicinity. He was married to the former Marie Lyman. He had suffered a severe heart attack on April 7 and passed away May 14.

He is survived by his wife, Marie, two sons, Richard of Ramrod Key, Fla. and Wallace of Wellsville, Ohio; three daughters, Harriet (Mrs. Homer) Strampe of Laurens; Dolores (Mrs. John) Hopkins of Morris, Il.; Marion Thayer of Fort Walton Beach, Fla; one brother Frank Kladky of Guernsey; five sisters, Mrs. Mary Johnson of Maquoketa; Mrs. Brances Paulu of Cedar Rapids; Mrs. Helen Paul of Palos Park, Il., Mrs. Paulines Hadacek of Bent Mountain, Va., and Mrs. Henrietta Clouse of Monrovia, Calif; 27 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death on one son, Robert.

A memorial service was held in the Olga-Fort Myers Shores Methodist church May 21. His ashes are to be interred at the IOOF cemetery, Victor, Iowa.

Joseph learned telegraphy while working with his Uncle Paul at the Vining Railroad Depot.
Us Army Signal Corp--WWI

More About JOSEPH FERDINAND HLADKY:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Victor, Tama Co., Iowa
Military service: WWI US ARMY SIGNAL CORP.
Occupation: RR Lineman

[NI3584] Notes for DONALD KEITH MILLER:
OBIT DONALD MILLER
Donald Keith Miller, 38, of 4312 C Avenue NE, died Thursday after a short illness.
Born July 3, 1928, at LaPorte City, he had been a resident of Cedar Rapids 20 years. Mr. Miller was a car salesman for Grant Williams Fordtown. He had been a member of the Hanford American Legion post No. 5 and VFW post No. 788. He served in the Navy from 1945 to 1949.

He was married to Jackie Wehrman April 23, 1965, at Rock Island, Il.

Surviving in additin to his wife are a son Michael; his mother, Mrs. Elsie Miller of Cedar Rapids; four sisters, Mrs. Curtis Landis of Cedar Rapids; Mrs. Lloyd McAtee of Solon; Mrs. Clinton Williams of Greenville, Miss., and Mrs. Paul roberts of Escatawpa, Miss. and Richard R. Miller of Newhall.\Services: Monday at 10 a.m. at Janeba-Kuba funeral home by the Rev. Alvin Boettcher of the First Congregational church of Belle Plaine. Burial: Linwood cemetery with military graveside services by the American Legion. Friends, if they wish, may contribute to the American Cancer Society. The casket will be open from noon Saturday to noon Sunday. Friends may call at the Janeba-Kuba funeral home after noon Saturday.
SOURCE: THE CEDAR RAPIGS GAZETTE, JUNE 9, 1967 PAGE 3

More About DONALD KEITH MILLER:
Burial: Linwood cem.
Military service: Bet. 1945 - 1949, WWII, Navy

[NI3585] Notes for HAZEL MAE LYMAN:
A Mrs. Wayne Dolmage in 2000 is listed at 2498 400th Ave., Victor, Iowa.

In an email from Fran Mohr, Aunt Hazel passed away yesterdat (4/29/01). I just found out about 2 hours ago from Myrt's daughter, Bonnie. Mitzi didn't even bother calling. the visitation is Tues. eve from 6-9 but the family can go anytime after 10 for a viewing. It's at the Smith Funeral Home, Victor, Ia.. The funeral is Wed. (May 2, 2001) at 10 AM at the United Methodist Church with a reception afterwards.

IN MEMORY OF HAZEL MAE DOLMAGE
Hazel was born on January 11, 1907, on the family farm near Hartwick, Iowa to George and Maude Keysor Lyman. She was raised on the family fram and graduated from Guernsey High School.

On November 21, 1926, she was married to Wayne Price Dolmage in Brooklyn, Iowa. The couple oived on a farm in Warren Township, south of Victor, where they operated a grain and livestock farm. She raised her eleven children and enjoyed gardening and flowers.
She was a member of the United Methodist Church of Victor and a charter member of the H and W women's club.

Survivors include her children, Thelma Richardson of Schgenectady, New Yori, Vern Dolmage of San Diego, California, Lillian Tiller of Port Townsend, Washington, Shelia Varner of Cedar Rapids, David Dolmage of Victor, Dennis Dolmage of Grundy Center, Laura Reed of Voorheesville, New York, Daisianna Dodds of Burlington, and R. Dean Dolmage of Victor; twenty-six grandchildren; twelve great grandchildren; one great great grandchild; and one sister, Bernice Reida of Lake View, Iowa.

Hazel died on Sunday, April 29, 2001, at Grinnell Regional Medical Center. She was 94 years of age, and preceded in death by her husband, Wayne; two daughters, Valerie and Colleen; three sisters, Thelma Mohr, Dorothy Heishman and Marie Hladky; and two brothers, Cloyd and Cecil Lyman.

FUNERAL SERVICE
10:00 a.m., Wedneday, May 2, 2001
United Methodist Church
Victor, Iowa
OFFICIANT
Rev. Audrey Westendord
Pastor of the
New Covenant Parish
United Methodist Church
Victor, Iowa
MUSIC
Colleeen Van Zee--organist
"Shadows" "Amazing Grace"
"Ivory Palaces"
CASKET BEARERS
Kevin Cerveny Wayne Richardson
Michael Cope Grant Dolmage
George Dodds Greg Dolmage
David Dodds Brad Dolmage
Nick Dolmage
INTERMENT
Victor Memorial Cemetery
Victor, Iowa
The family will receive relatives and friends for lunch in the hall of the church following the graveside service.
SMITH FUNERAL HOME
Victor, Iowa

More About HAZEL MAE LYMAN:
Burial: May 02, 2001, Victor Mem. Cem., Victor, Iowa Co., Ia.

[NI3588] had come from New Jersey.

[NI3627] Notes for EVA MAE SHAW:
CARDINGTON OHIO, THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1939 NO. 18 PAGE 5
IN AND OUT OF TOWN
Mrs. Eva Callihan has returned home from Columbus, where she spent a week with her sister, Mrs. E. C. Higgins.

IN AND OUT OF TOWN
Mrs. E. C. Higgins of Columbus, and Mrs. Helen Culber of Kellogg, Idaho, are spending the week with Mrs. Eva Callihan and other relatives, Mrs. Culber is a niece of Mrs. Callihan and is returning from the W. B. A. convention and New York World's Fair. She was also the woman representing Idaho at Idaho day at the World's fair.

CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1939 NO. 45 PAGE 2
COURT HOUSE NOTES
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Eva Callihan to E. L. James, et al. 24.14 acres in Cardington Twp.

CARDINGTON, OHIO, THRUSDAY, MAY 11, 1939 VOL. LIV, NO. 19 PAGE 1
LOCAL HAPPENINGS
Mrs. Eva Callihan has purchased the B. J. Gates lunch room, and took possession Monday.

CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1940 VOL. LX, NO. 27 PAGE 2
COURT HOUSE NOTES
MARRIAGE LICENSES
Emerson Clay Armstrong, 31, truck driver, Mt. Gilead, and Dorothy Marie Callahan, 28, waitress, Mt. Gilead.

More About EVA MAE SHAW:
Burial: Glendale Cemetery, Cardington Twp., Morrow Co., Oh.

[NI3636] Notes for LINDA KAY REIDA:
Also have her birth month as July. I also had her middle name as Kay. Her father's obit has her last name as Reida so I don't know if she was married after that time, or was divorced and resummed using her maiden name.

[NI3662] Tim Lee Adams served in the Army. He was in Viet Nam (1969 earning his Sgt stripes while on a fire base). He married and had one son. Tim died in a motor cycle accident at 28 years of age. He loved fast cars and motorcycles.

[NI3663] Submitted by Sharon Swadener

Her dad's name when he came over from Leszno, Poland, probably in 1911, was Joseph Trebahovitz (or Trebahovitch). He changed his name to Tyson after he got over here. He was born March 19th, 1893 in Poland. He died July 15th, 1949. He lived with a cousin, Lewis Radeski in New Jersey City for a while. He enlisted in the army on June 4th 1914, and was honorably discharged on June 4th, 1920. Sometime after that he started working for Union Pacific. He had a brother, Nicolas, that stayed in Leszno, Poland.

[NI3673] Georgiana never remarried and died of a long illness.

[NI3708] Lived 4 months, 2 days.

[NI3720] Notes for MARIE LOUISE LYMAN:
From information sent to me by Sherry Bonduau; Sherry sent lots of clippins, pictures and a copy of Maude's journal. This information looks like it was part of the journal but is on Marie Louise Lyman; " Marie Louise Lyman Born March 24, 1905 on a country farm near Hartwick Iowa in Poweshiek co.

When 2 years old moved to a farm 5 1/2 mi. S. W. of Victor Iowa. Attended the one room country school through the 8th grade. Graduated from Guernsey Consolidated high school in 1924. Taught in the country school for one year (same school I attended) {this is a noted added to the journal, I think by Marie}

May 22, 1925 I was married to Joseph Ferdinand Hladky who worked as a station agent & telegrapher. As a child I attended the congregational church at Carnforth Ia. I was baptized at the age of 17 in the church of the Bretheran. I joined the "Order of the Eastern Star" in 1925 and served as worthy matron at Hubbard Ia. After 50 years of membership I received a lifetime membership.

When I married Joe I accepted his two boys Robert & Richard as my own. After which we had four children Harriet Ruth, Wallace Franklin, Dolores Marie and Marian Elaine. As we moved from place to place on the job for the Chicago North Western Railroad we attended and joined several church denominations. The Congregational, Federated, Evangelical Presbyterian and Methodist. We learned from this experience that church denominations means nothing. There is just one God. I am at present a member of the United Methodist Church
American Legion Auziliary
Order of Eastern Star
Retired Railroad Club N.A.R.V.R.E.
Fort Myers Shores Improvement Association
There are 27 grandchildren
so far 35 gr grandchildren 1981
6 gr gr grandchildren
My parents--George & Maude Lyman
Two brothers--Cecil & Cloyd (oldest)
Five sisters in order of age, Marie, Hazel, Thelma, Dorothy, Bernice.

More About MARIE LOUISE LYMAN:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Victor, Tama Co., Iowa

[NI3732] He was a carpenter. After his death, Margaret and her two children lived wiht her widowed mother in Miami Twp. Montgomery County. She worked as a bookbinder in 1900

[NI3736] Notes for LUCILLE K. PECK:
Her name has also been spelt Pech

[NI3738] Notes for MILDRED WALTER:
Services for Mrs. Mildred Connell, 62, of 8113 Holmes Road, were held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at Hudson Community Church with burial in Orange Township Cemetery.

She died Tuesday night at Allen Memorial Hispital, Waterloo.

Mrs. Connell was born Aug. 11, 1917, at Guernsey, daughter of Frank L. and Elsie Rose Walter. She married Rollin L. Connell October 23, 1938 in Nashua. Survivors include her husband; a daughter, Nancy Gilbert of Hudson; two grandsons and a sister, LaVonne Carlson of Brooklyn.

SHOWER FOR RECENT BRIDE AT GUERNSEY
Mrs. F. Walter Entertains For Daughter Saturday
GUERNSEY--A pre-nuptial shower was given Saturday afternoon for miss Mildred Walter in the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Walter.

the afternoon was delightfully spent in playing games and stunts with Mrs. Perry Daugherty in charge.
A delicious lunch was served by Mrs. Walter and daughter, La Vaun, assisted by Miss Arlene Goodlow and Miss Gertrude Burke, classmates of the bride-to-be. Miss Mildred received a number of beautiful and practical gifts.

Those present were: Mrs. J. W. Rose, grandmother of the bride; Mrs. Leeman McWilliams and Deloris, Mrs. Elmer Walter and daughters, Margaret and Irene, Mrs. Perry Daughterty and Norma, Miss Thelma Walter, Miss dorothy Walter, Miss Susanne Urfer, Miss Gertrude Burke, Mrs. Glenn Connell, Mrs. Harvey Jones, Mrs. John Morton, Mrs. J. P. Dieterich, Mrs. Cecil Schrader, Mrs. H. L. Schrader, Mrs. Goodlow and Mrs. Frank Walter and daughters, La Vaun and Mildred.


MRS. GLENN CONNELL AND MRS. HARVEY JONES ARE HOSTESSES
Mrs. Glenn Connell and Mrs. Harvey Jones were hostesses at a shower held at the Connell home thursday, November 10, honoring Mrs. Rollin Connell a recent bride. The afternoon was spent playing games after which the guest of honor was presented with many beautiful and useful gifts. About 40 were presnt.
SOURCE: BROOKLYN CHORNICLE, NOVEMBER 17, 1938

[NI3740] Notes for LINDA IGEL:
From Fern Norris, have her last name as Schussler. This last name is also the same in the journal of Maude Mae Keysor Lyman

[NI3741] Notes for REX RICHARD ROHRER:
When he married he was from Seattle.
SOURCE OF BIRTH INFO: Poweshiek Co. Birth Records, Bk 5 (1918-1921)
I had his father as Peter before Marilyn found the information in the Birth Records

[NI3743] They were truck farmers in Van Buren Twp, Montgomery County, Ohio

[NI3757] Notes for WILLIS S. GIBBONS:
According to information sent to me by Margaret Davis from the marriage record; Willis was 24 when they were married and that he was born in Muskingum Co., Ohio.

[NI3759] More About DAUGHTER CHAMBERS:
Burial: Harmony Chapel Cemetry "Blackbird Cemetry Row 8

[NI3761] Notes for LYDIA SAMANTHA CHAMBERS:
According to the History of Morrow Co. Ohio book of 1989 they had 8 children. The information was submitted by Richard Franklin Davis, 126 North Cherry Street, Mt. Gelead, Ohio 43338.

THE MORROW COUNTY SENTINEL
A Weekly Newspaper, Devoted To The Interests Of Morrow County And The Republican Party
Vol. LII Mt. Gilead, Morrow County Ohio, Thursday, September 14, 1899 No. 12 Page 1
PULASKIVILLE
The family of Enoch Higgins, Sr., was called to Ashley on Monday by the death of Mrs. Wm. Hathaway.

CHESTNUT GROVE
Rev. Mary E. Sipe was called to preach two funeral sermons Tuesday; one being Mrs. William Hathaway, of near Alum Creek who died of the dreaded disease, cancer. She was brought ot the Black Bird cemetery, near her old home and laid to rest: not lost but gone before. The other funeral being at Ashley, Delaware county, a lady who leaves five children. Truly there is another side to life.

Page 5
ANOTHER CANCER VICTIM
Mrs. William Hathaway died Sunday at her home, east of town, after several months of intense suffering from cancer. She was operated upon last April with hopes that she might find relief and that her life might be prolonged; but it was not successful and her suffering during the past two months has been terrible to witness. The funeral services were held Tuesday morning and were attendd by a number od Cardington people.

PULASKIVILLE
William Hathaway and two children, of near Ashley, spent Saturday night in town.

THE MORROW COUNTY INDEPENDENT
CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1899 VOL. XXVIII NO. 35 PAGE 5
LOCAL NOTES
Mrs. Wm. Hathaway, living two miles southeast of Ashley, died Sunday night and was buried in the Blackbird graveyard Tuesday, after services held at the house. She had been ill some time and leaves a family of seven children. The family until last spring lived near Cardington.

CARDINGTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1899 VOL. XXVVIII NO. 36 PAGE 4
OBITUARY
It has been said that loves a shining mark and that in the midst of life we are in midst of death. These truisms were never more exemplified than in the death of Mrs. Lydda Chambers Hathaway, who was born March 12, 1854, and died September 10, 1899, aged 45 years, 5 months and 28 days. She was married to Wm. D. Hathaway January 22, 1876. Of this union there were born eight children, the two eldest having preceded their mother to the better world. She leaves a kind husband, five little boys, one girl, two brothers, five sisters and a host of friends to mourn their loss. She united with the M. E. church when quite young. She was a kind mother, a devoted and loving wife and the influence of her quiet, unselfish and consistent life will long remain to bless the communities in which she has lived. During her last illness her prayer was that she might live to care forher family a few more years, but she was willing to do the Lord's bidding. To her death had no terrors. Not now but in the coming years it may be in the better land we will read the meaning of our tears and there sometime we will understand. Her remains were laid to rest in the Blackbird cemetery on Tuesday afternoon, September 12.
Rev. Mary E. Sipe of Friends church preached the funeral discourse to those who had come to pay their last respects to one they had learned to love.

THE MORROW COUNTY SENTINEL
VOL LII MT. GILEAD, MORROW COUNTY OHIO, THRUSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1899 NO. 13 PAGE 7
OBITUARIES
HATHAWAY--It has been said: Death loves a shining mark, and that in the midst of life we are in death." These truisms were never more exemplified than in the deat of Mrs. Lyda Chambers Hathaway, who was born March 12th, 1854, and died September 10, 1899, aged 45 years, 5 months and 28 days. She was married to William D. Hathaway, January 22d, 1876. To this union there were born 8 children, the two oldest having preceded the mother to the better world. She leaves a kind husband, five little boys, one gilr, tow brothers, five sisters and a host of friends to mourn their loss. She united with the M. E. church when quite young. She was a kind mother, a devoted and loving wife, and the influence of her quiet, unselfish and consistent life will long remain to bless the communities in which she has lived. During her last illness her prayer was that she might live to care for her family a few more years, but she was willing to do the Lord's bidding. To her death had no terrors. Not now but in the coming years, it may be in the better land, we will read the meaning of our tears, and there sometime we'll understand. Her remains were laid to rest in the Blackbird cemetery on Tuesday afternoon, September 12th. Rev. Mary E. Sipe, of the Friends church preached the funeral discourse to those who had come to pay their last respects to one they had learned to love.

More About LYDIA SAMANTHA CHAMBERS:
Burial: September 12, 1899, Blackbird Cemetry, Harmony Twp., Morrow Co., Ohio

[NI3768] Notes for DOUGLAS VAN HORN:
Sherry Bodreau has his last name as VanHome

[NI3824] From the Book - Rauenzahner to Routson - A Family on the Move page 142

His middle initial was given as "A" in the 1860 and 1870 censuses and on gr. st., but as "H" in Montgomery County sources. Additionally, there is a noticable gap between his birth and that of his brother John six year later, thus suggesting the possibility of additional siblings born between 1853/1855e. William farmed in Van Buren Twp and owned his own place.

[NI3830] Nathan graduated from college.

[NI3844] Notes for LAVERNE MILO RANFELD:
Ranfeld infomation came from Poewshiek Co. History Book (Published 1991, page 274 Ranfeld.

[NI3845] Notes for FRANK LANDUYT:
Information on their marriage came from Poweshiek Co. Marriage Records.

[NI3860] Notes for BENJAMIN LEROY CHAMBERS:
June 1, 1860 Census of Morrow County, Harmony Tws., Ohio had Benjamin listed as being a farmer and still residing with his parents.

More About BENJAMIN LEROY CHAMBERS:
Occupation: Farmer

[NI3862] Copied from The Pacific County Press O)ctober 3, 2003, page 9

Kyle Brendan Strozyk was born Thursday, September 4, 2003 at Providence St. Peters Hospital in Olympia to Todd and Brenda Strozyk. He weighed in at 6 pounds 15 ounces.

His grandparents are Steve and Sandra Evertson of Raymond, Pat Hamilton of Menlo and Charles Strozyk of Longview.

He joins his four-year-old brother Jacob.

[NI3884] Charles and Nora appear in the 1920 federal census for Crow Wing County, Minnesota. They were living in Wolford Township. His age is recorded as 49 and hers is 39. Charles was working at the iron mills as a blacksmith. No occupation is listed for Nora. It appears they were living in a boarding house. I give two reasons for this theory. The census shows that 1) they were renting and 2) that Matt Nihula family of seven was living there as well. Matt's wife was recorded as Selma. The names of the Nihula's children were Annie, Eileen, Lillian, Bruno and Reno.

The census records the birthplace of both Charles parents as New York while Maurice father was born in Indiana and her mother in Pennsylvania.

Maimie was also listed in the census, which was taken on January 10, 1920. Maimie was a daughter of Charles and Nora. She was 21 years old and single and working as a serving in the boarding house. It seems plausible that it may have been the same boarding house her parents were living in.

[NI3898] Walter Besonson was born in Minnesota on Nov. 25, 1899. Most likely in Deerwood or at least Crow Wing County, Minnesota.

[NI3900] Copied from Ohio Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death
Documents provided to Author by Jeanne Yoakam

Reg. Dist No. 20
Primary Reg. Dist. No.2000
State File No.080030
Registrar's No.294

1.Deceased - Name:Nellie Swaidner
2.Sex:Female
3.Date of Death:November 24, 1975
4.Race:White
5.Age - Last birthday:79
6.Date of Birth:March 22, 1896
7.(a)County of Death:Defiance
(b)City, Village, or Location of Death:Hicksville
(c)Inside City Limits:Yes
(d)Hospital or other Insitution:Fountain Manor Nursing Home
8.State of Birth:Indiana
9.Citizen of What Country:USA
10.Married, Never Married, Widowed, Divorced:Widowed
11.Surviving spouse:No
12.(a)Social Security Number:302-18-9113 {Editor's Note: Husband's SSN} (her 283-20-0154)
(b)Was Deceased Ever in U.S. Armed Forces:No
13.(a)Usual Occupation:Housewife
(b)Kind of Business or Industry:Housewife
14.(a)Residence:Ohio
(b)County:Defiance
(c)City, Village, or Location:Hicksville
(d)Inside City Limits:Yes
(e)Street and Number:Fountain Manor
15.Father - Name:N/A
16.Mother- Name:N/A
17.(a)Informat - Name:Mr. Ray Moore
(b)Mailing Address:Auburn, Indiana
Part I.Death was Caused by:
18.(a)Cerebral Vascular AccidentApproximate Interval between onset and death:3 days
(b)Advanced Generalized Arterioselerosis:Approximate Interval between onset and death:4 years
Part II.
19.(a)Autopsy:No
(b)n/a
20.(a)n/a
(b)n/a
(c)n/a
(d)n/a
(e)n/a
(g)n/a
21(a)Certification - Physican:I attended the deceased from 1965
(b)to November 24, 1975
(c)and last saw her alive on:November, 21, 1975
(d)I did not view the body after death.
(e)Death Occurred (hour)10:00 AM
22.(a)Certification - Corner:n/a
(b)n/a
23.(a)Certifier:Paul B. Kerr, MD
(b)Signature:Paul b. Kerr, MD
(c)Date Signed:November 26, 1975
(d)Mailing Address-Certifer:Dr. Paul B. Kerr, 101 Bunnel Street, Hicksville, Ohio 43526
24.(a)Burial, Cremation:Burial
(b)Date:November, 28, 1975
(c)Name of Cemetery or Crematory:Scipio Cemetery
(d)Location:Scipio, Allen County, Indiana
25.Name of Embalmer:James E. ColeLic No.7193-A
26.Funeral Director's SignatureJames E. ColeLic No.6451
27.Funeral Firm and Address:Perkins-Reeb Funeral Home, 103 East Cornelia, Hicksville, Ohio 43526
28.Date Rec'd by Local Reg:December 1, 1975
29.Registrar's Signature:Mildred A. Snyder
30.Date Permit Issued:November 28, 1975
31.Signature of Person Issuing Permit:R. P. WeberDist. No. 20

[NI3904] Jeff had decided on being a firefighter and EMT long before he graduated from High School. He plans to enter college and obtain a degree (BA) and a Masters (MA) in firefighting. Right after graduation from high school he began working with the local fire department, but had to obtain written permission from his mother (Reva) to ride with the EMT's and firefighters. You've got to love this kid, soon to be a man.

[NI3909] Notes for GEORGE LYMAN, JR.:
Services Wednesday for George Lyman
Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Wednesday from the McAninch Chapel in Victor for George Lyman, 91. Rev. George Roquet, pastor of the United Presbyterian church, Brooklyn, officiated. Mr. Lyman died April 24 at the Plaine Crest Nursing Home, Belle Plaine, where he has spent the past three years.

Mrs. Edith Shaul was orgnaist. Casket bearers were David Dolmage, Merlyn Mohr, Wallace Hladky, Johnnie Werle and Dennis Dolmage. Honorary bearers ere Wallace Edelen, Andrew Calderwood, August Heinen, Cliff Williamson, Glen Connell, Nelson Korns and Delmar Heishman. Burial was in I.O.O.F. cemetery, Victor.
George Lyman, the son of George and Mary Jane Border Lyman, was born in Victor April 29, 1876. He received his education in the rural school.

On Oct. 18, 1899 he married Maude Mae Keysor. They farmed in Poweshiek county, moving to Brooklyn in 1930 where they lived until Mr. Lyman's health failed in 1964. He was hospitalized at the Marengo Memorial hospital and later transferred to the Plaine Crest Nursing home.

He served on the board of the Poweshiek county Mutual Insurance company of Grinnell for 33 years. He was assessor, township trustee, director of the rural school for several years, a memmber of the Brooklyn I.O.O.F. lodge for over 50 years and a charter member of the Golden Wedding club of Brooklyn. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman ovserved their 67th wedding anniversary on October 18, 1966.

Survivors include his wife, Maude and their seven children, Cecil, Fort Dodge; Cloyd, Victor; Marie, Mrs. J.F. Hladky, Mrs. Wayne Dolmage, Victor; Thelma, Mrs. Dale Mohr, West Liberty; Dorothy, Mrs. Wayne Heishman, Des Plaines, Ill., and Bernice, Mrs. T.W. Reida, Lake View; 25 grandchildren, 57 great-grandchildren, and one sister, Mrs. Bertha Bope, Belle Plains.

He was preceded in death by his parents, five sisters, three brothers, three grandchildren and on great grandchild.

More About GEORGE LYMAN, JR.:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Victor, Iowa
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for GEORGE LYMAN:
in 1900, he resided in Jefferson Twp, Powershiek, IA. His occupation was that of a farmer. Lived inIarren Twp, Powershiek, IA in 1910. He was 33 years old and had been married 10 years. His occupation was farm laborer. The 1920 census shows him living in Warren Twp, Powershiek, IA with the occupation of farm manager. In 1930 he was living in Carnforth. He was living in Brooklyn, Powershiek, IA in 1954

[NI3983] Family History - 8 Oct 1999

----------------------------------------
1. John Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:1817
Birth Place:Bueiren Germany?
Death Date:20 Jul 1878
Death Place:Crawford Co. Kansas
Occupation:Farmer

Spouse:Catherine Pierce
Birth Date:2 Feb 1827
Birth Place:Pennsylvania
Death Date:24 Feb 1899
Death Place:Farlington, Kansas
Burial Place:Farlington, Kansas
Occupation:Housewife

Marriage Date:1847

Children:George
Mary
Rachel
Henry
Sarah Viola

1.1 George Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:20 Jun 1860
Birth Place:Evansville, Indiana
Death Date:24 Mar 1930
Death Place:Kingsdown, Kansas
Burial Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Occupation:Farmer

Spouse:Carrie Ella Gardiner
Birth Date:3 May 1860
Birth Place:Brewster, Maine
Death Date:13 Mar 1945
Death Place:Protection, Ks
Burial Place:Bucklin, Kansas

Marriage Date:7 Oct 1883
Marriage Place:Crawford Co. Kansas

Children:Ora Jennings
Leslie Lloyd
Ralph Monroe
Nellie Luella Violet Pansy Pearl
Verna Ray
George Curtis Lafayette

1.1.1 Ora Jennings Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:
Death Date:Nov 1972
Death Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Occupation:Mechanic, Tavern Owner, Farmer
Education:High School, Machanic School in Kansas City
Religion:Presbyterian

Spouse:Anna Johanna Peterson
Birth Date:5 May 1898
Death Date:Sep 1973
Death Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Burial Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Occupation:Beautician
Religion:Presbyterian

Children:Edward Raymond
Curt
Ora Junior

1.1.1.1 Edward Raymond Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:23 Mar 1919
Birth Place:Kingsdown, Kansas
Death Date:5 Jul 1972
Death Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Burial Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Occupation:Farmer
Education:High School

Spouse:Bettie Jo Heikes
Birth Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Occupation:Housewife
Education:High School
Religion:Presbyterian

Children:Lewis Edward
Robert Joe
Gale Eugene
Margaret Ann

1.1.1.1.1 Lewis Edward Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:12 Oct 1947
Birth Place:Dodge City, Kansas
Occupation:Electrician & Electrical Inspector
Education:1 1/2 Years College
Religion:Presbyterian

Spouse:Mary Jeannette Burghart
Birth Date:6 Aug 1950
Birth Place:Spearville, Kansas
Occupation:Nurse RN
Education:Bachelors Degree
Religion:Catholic

Marriage Date:8 Apr 1972
Marriage Place:Offerle, Kansas

Children:Lance Raymond
Scott Edward
Chelsi Ann

1.1.1.1.2 Robert Joe Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:8 Nov 1950
Birth Place:Dodge City, Kansas
Education:BS in Business
Religion:Catholic

1.1.1.1.3 Gale Eugene Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:14 Feb 1957
Birth Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Burial Place:Bucklin, Kansas
Education:BS in Business

1.1.1.1.4 Margaret Ann Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:1 Jan 1958
Birth Place:Bucklin, Kansas

1.1.1.2 Curt Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:12 Mar 1925
Birth Place:Kingsdown, Kansas
Death Date:Oct 1986
Death Place:Eunice, New Mexico

Spouse:Marietta Hurley

Children:Martin
Rose Marie

1.1.1.2.1 Martin Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:Aug 1950
Occupation:Electrical Engineer
Education:Bachelor's

Children:Meggan

1.1.1.2.2 Rose Marie Lininger
----------------------------------------

1.1.1.3 Ora Junior Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:15 Dec 1929
Death Date:Nov 1972
Death Place:Bucklin, Kansas

1.1.2 Leslie Lloyd Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:23 Sep 1890
Birth Place:Farlington, Kansas
Death Date:3 Sep 1966

1.1.3 Ralph Monroe Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:13 Nov 1892
Birth Place:Farlington, Kansas
Death Date:23 Feb 1968
Death Place:Protection, Kansas
Occupation:Farmer

Spouse:Thelma
Birth Date:23 Jun 1908
Death Date:Jan 1978

1.1.4 Nellie Luella Violet Pansy Pearl Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:4 Feb 1895
Birth Place:Farlington, Kansas
Death Date:23 Mar 1982

1.1.5 Verna Ray Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:3 Feb 1888
Birth Place:Farlington, Kansas
Death Date:12 Nov 1936

1.1.6 George Curtis Lafayette Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:8 Mar 1899
Birth Place:Farlington, Kansas
Death Date:25 Feb 1988
Death Place:Bucklin, Kansas

1.2 Mary Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:1849
Death Date:1902

1.3 Rachel Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:1853

1.4 Henry Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:1855
Death Date:1862

1.5 Sarah Viola Lininger
----------------------------------------
Birth Date:19 Oct 1857
Birth Place:Evansville, Indiana
Death Date:13 Jun 1908
Death Place:Irwin, Missouri


_Index
----------------------------------------
Lininger, Curt 1.1.1.2
Lininger, Edward Raymond 1.1.1.1
Lininger, Gale Eugene 1.1.1.1.3
Lininger, George 1.1
Lininger, George Curtis Lafayette 1.1.6
Lininger, Henry 1.4
Lininger, John 1.
Lininger, Leslie Lloyd 1.1.2
Lininger, Lewis Edward 1.1.1.1.1
Lininger, Margaret Ann 1.1.1.1.4
Lininger, Martin 1.1.1.2.1
Lininger, Mary 1.2
Lininger, Nellie Luella Violet Pansy Pearl 1.1.4
Lininger, Ora Jennings 1.1.1
Lininger, Ora Junior 1.1.1.3
Lininger, Rachel 1.3
Lininger, Ralph Monroe 1.1.3
Lininger, Robert Joe 1.1.1.1.2
Lininger, Rose Marie 1.1.1.2.2
Lininger, Sarah Viola 1.5
Lininger, Verna Ray 1.1.5


[NI3990] Born: 04-03-2002
Birth Time: 1:33 PM
@ North Hills Hospitall
Weight: 6lbs 11oz
Length: 19.5

[NI3997] Born at Kettering Hospital, Kettering, Ohio
E-mail from Doty:
We are sending an update to announce the wedding of our youngest daughter, Teresa, who will be married on Sat. August 3rd, in Austin, TX, at Zilker Botanical Gardens, to James "Jim" Rusnak born and raised in CA, who is also Catholic. Jim is a Child/Adolescent Psychiatrist, and his medical contract is not up till next year, so they will be making their home in Austin, TX for another year. So keep them in your prayers on their wedding day.

[NI4057] Copied from a newspaper clipping found in the personal effects of Leora E. Hamilton.

Obituary: Clarence "Tud" Kinnaman

Olympia-Elma native Clarence "Tud" Kinnaman, who lived in Olympia for nine years, died of cancer Sunday, May 28, 2000, and his home. He was 89.

He was born March 16, 1911, to William and Leona [Withers] Kinnaman. He grew up in Elma and Porter and had also lived at Salkum for 48 years. On Aug. 18, 1932, he married Leona Kitchel. She died before him.

Mr. Kinnaman had been a logger for the St. Regis Logging Company in Lewis County. He was a member of the Chehalis Eagles Club Lumber and Sawmills Workers Union. He enjoyed fishing, gardening, clamming, and traveling in his trailer.

Surviving are two sons, Jerry of Spokane and Michael of Olympia; a sister, France's Boyer of Porter; five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. A memorial service is planned for 2 PM Saturday, June 3, at the Porter Sunday school, eight miles south of Elma on Highway 12.

Arrangements are by the Olympia Funeral Home of Tumwater. Memorial donations are suggested to Providence Sound Home Care and Hospice, 3706 Griffin Lane SE, Olympia, Washington 98501

[NI4063] Terry got his college degree from Humbolt University, Arcata, California. He ran the heart/lung machine at UCLA Medical Center and in Northern California for several years. He later became the wine maker at Sonoma-Cutrer Winery.

[NI4074] Notes for ENOCH HIGGINS:
In 1864 he was a Private.

1850 Census Morrow Co., Ohio;
Catharine Higgans (70) FR 491a; Celias Higgans (10) FR 490b; Elias Higgans (54) FR 490b; Enoch Higgans (18) FR 490b; Harcy Higgans (27) FR 490b; John Higgans (20) FR 490b; Mary Higgans (50) FR 490b; Mary Higgans (14) FR 490b; Sarah Higgans (12) FR 490b; Silvester (16) FR 490b.

From The Morrow County, Ohio History of 1880, page 785. "Enoch Higgins, farmer, in wife Leah Lovett died Feb 1867. On Oct. 7, 1869, he married Mary E., a daughter of William and Eliazebeth (Darner) Chambers; she was born July 7, 1846, in Harmony Tp., of this county. They have 2 children--Dilla E. and Rosella. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church at Pulaskiville.

From Biographical Sketches of Morrow Co., Ohio; ENOCH HIGGINS, farmer; P.O., Pulaskiville; was born Dec. 11, 1831, in Franklin Tp., then in Knox Co., Ohio; is the fourth son of Eliza and Mary (Hart) Higgins; his father was the son of Joseph and Catherine (Heudershott) Higgins, and was born Aug. 15, 1795, in Bedford Co., Penn.; he came to this county in 1816, without capital, and worked for others until he earned money enough to buy a quarter-section of land. He was married to Mary, a daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Kearney) Hart, June 15, 1820; she was born July 24, 1799, in Bedford Co., Penn.; her parents came from Pennsylvania to Perry Tp., then in Knox Co., in the Spring of 1811, where they settled, raising a family of nine children--William, John, Benjamin, Enoch, Levi, Mary, Elizabeth, Margart and Sarah. The Hart family at one time fled in the night ot the fort at Fredericktown; and during the panic caused by the murder of the whites at Mansfield, they fled to Waterford, and assisted in building a block-house near that place. The father of Enoch after marriage, settld on the farm where Samuel James lives; in two weeks after the first log was cut, they moved into their cabin. To use the words of the aged mother, "It had neither floors, doors, chinking, chimney nor windows, but we ate our meals from nice clean clap-boards spread upon the sleepers, and felt very Happy." Here they reared ten children--Harriet, Harvey, Curtis, Ella, Monroe, Enoch, Sylvester, Mary J., Sarah E. and Elias. All are married and have families. the older Mr. and Mrs. Higgins have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church over forty years. he identified himself with the Republican pary at its organization, andwas an earnest supporter of its principles. He passed away peacefully Jan. 6, 1880 at the age of 84 years. His venerable wife still lives with her youngest son in the old home. Enoch Higgins remained at home with his parents until he was 21 years of age, then rented his father's farm for three years, and in 1855 went to Wisconsin, where he entered 160 acres of land; he then returned home and remained until 1857, again going to Wisconsin and was there two years, building a house and improving the land which he had previously purchased, returning to the scenes of his childhood in 1859. he celebrated our nation's Independence by his marriage to Leah Lovett, July 4, 1861. they have one son, Clinton O. Mrs. Higgins died in Feb. 1867. On Oct. 7, 1869, he married Mary E., a daughter of Willaim and Elizabeth (Darner) Chambers; she was born July 7, 1846, in Harmony Tp., of this county. They have two children--Dilla E. and Rosella. He and wife are members of the M. E. Church at Pulaskiville; he enlisted in the 136 Reg., Co. I. O.N.G., and remained in the service four months. He owns seventy acres of well improved land, earned by his own labor and enterprise.

More About ENOCH HIGGINS:
Burial: November 20, 1902, Pulaskiville Cemetery, Morrow Co., , Ohio
Military service: Civil War Co. I, 136th Regt O.V.I.

[NI4075] Notes for JAMES ELSON:
From Erin, ebay, Source: roster Iowa Soldiers--War of Rebellion Vo. @ Comppany C
Elson, James M. age 21. Residence of Palo, nativity Ohio. Enlisted Sept. 6, 1861, as Second Corporal. Mustered Sept. 24, 1861. Promoted First Corporal March 8, 1862; Fourth Sergeant. wounded severely in thigh May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss. Promoted Second Lieutenant May 23, 1863. Wounded severely in breast Aug. 17, 1864, Atlanta, Ga. Promoted First Lieutenant Aug. 25, 1864. Mustered out April 6, 1865, Goldsboro, N. C.

[NI4077] Early Ohio Settlers, purchasers of Land 1800-1840
Enoch Everingham purchased land June 23, 1806. Residence: Butler county (organized 1803) "south-west" corner of Ohio near the Indiana.

[NI4106] Notes for H. C. ADAMS:
H. C. was a pipe fitter from Bowlinggreen, Ohio

More About H. C. ADAMS:
Occupation: Pipefitter

[NI4111] Nov 1639 (Drowned) in Probably in Hingham,
Massachusetts.

[NI4112] Notes for WILLIAM CHAMBERS:
Birth date was found in History of Morrow County Ohio Book.
William was 76 years 4 months and 22 days old when he died.
Original Land Purchasers
Richland County, Ohio
Range 19 Township 20
Location Section 7 C-SW 1/2
Date of Purchase May 5, 1814
Purchaser William Chambers Allegheny Co., Pa.
Assignee Samuel Guthrie
No. of acres 240.42
Price per acre $2.00
Cash paid $390.69
Date of Patent August 24, 1827

1860 Census Morrow County, Harmony Tws. Ohio has William listed as a farmer

1850 Census, Monroe Co., Ohio
William (50) HA, 31b; Elizabeth (39), HA, 31b;Hannah (18), HA, 31b; Benjamin (16), HA 31b; Catherine (13), HA 31b; Ellen (2) HA 31b; Isabel (7) HA 31b; Mary (5) HA, 31b; Robert (20) HA 31b; Tamour (10) HA 31b.

More About WILLIAM CHAMBERS:
Burial: Harmony Chapel Cemetry "Blackbird Cemetry" Row 8
Occupation: Farmer

Notes for ELIZABETH DARNER:
Birth date was found in History of Morrow County Ohio Book.
The Morrow County Sentinel
Weekly Newspaper, Devoted to the Interests of Morrow County and the Republican Party

Mt. Gilead, Morrow County, Ohio,Thursday, August 2, 1894
Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers, a widow lady, aged 83 years, died Monday at the home of her son-in-law, B. J. Davis, near Chester Church. Funeral services were held on Tuesday, the remains being laid at rest in the Blackbird Cemetry.

The Sentinel, Mt. Gilead, Ohio, Thursday August 2, 1894
CHAMBERS--Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers, a resident of Harmony township, died Sunday, July 29th, aged 83 years and 9 months. The remains were interred at Blackbird on Tuesday.

Have one source that says Elizabeth was born June 19, 1810.
One place says that she is buried in Glendale Cemeterey in Cardington, Morrow Co., Ohio.

From a hand written journal of Maude Mae Keysor: Mothers great grandmothers name was Yost.
Her stepfathers name was Baker. (This makes me think that Elizabeth remarried after William died

[NI4114] Notes for ELIZABETH DARNER:
Birth date was found in History of Morrow County Ohio Book.
The Morrow County Sentinel Weekly Newspaper, Devoted to the Interests of Morrow County and the Republican Party

Mt. Gilead, Morrow County, Ohio,Thursday, August 2, 1894
Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers, a widow lady, aged 83 years, died Monday at the home of her son-in-law, B. J. Davis, near Chester Church. Funeral services were held on Tuesday, the remains being laid at rest in the Blackbird Cemetry.

The Sentinel, Mt. Gilead, Ohio, Thursday August 2, 1894
CHAMBERS--Mrs. Elizabeth Chambers, a resident of Harmony township, died Sunday, July 29th, aged 83 years and 9 months. The remains were interred at Blackbird on Tuesday.

Have one source that says Elizabeth was born June 19, 1810.
One place says that she is buried in Glendale Cemeterey in Cardington, Morrow Co., Ohio.

From a hand written journal of Maude Mae Keysor: Mothers great grandmothers name was Yost.
Her stepfathers name was Baker. (This makes me think that Elizabeth remarried after William died

More About ELIZABETH DARNER:
Burial: Harmony Chapel Cemetry "Blackbird Cemetry" Row 8
Nickname: Betsy

[NI4117] . MAUDE MAE3 KEYSOR (TAMAR RUTH2 CHAMBERS, WILLIAM1) was born March 05, 1877 in Brooklyn, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, and died December 21, 1969 in Sac City, Iowa. She married GEORGE LYMAN, JR. October 18, 1899 in Brooklyn, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, son of GEORGE LYMAN and MARY BORDER. He was born April 29, 1876 in Victor, Iowa Co., Ia., and died April 24, 1967 in Belle Plaine, Benton Co., Iowa.

Notes for MAUDE MAE KEYSOR:
A lot of the genealogy information on these families came from Maude. The information from Dorothy Davis has a statement that Maude was very helpful when we started this genealogy in 1965. Her mind was very sharp at that time and she lived with her son Cloyd in Victor, Iowa. We received a copy of a book that Maude kept with information on the various marriages, births and deaths of the family.

Rites Held for Mrs. George Lyman. Funeral services were held from the McAnich chapel, Victor, Dec. 23 for Mrs. George Lyman, 92, lifelong Brooklyn-Hartwick area resident, who died Dec. 21, at Sac City Hospital. Rev. H. Foxworthy officiated. Casket bearers were David Dolmage, Merlyn Mohr, Dennis Dolmage, Laverne Ranfeld, Dean Dolmage, Robert Berry. Music was provided by Mrs. Edith Shaul.
Maude Keysor, daughter of George and Tamar Chambers Keysor was born March 5, 1877 at Brooklyn.

On Oct. 18, 1899 she was married to George Lyman by the Rev. Hannan of Brooklyn. To this union seven children were born. After their marriage they farmed near Hartwick and then in 1907 they moved to a farm southwest of Carnsforth where they made their home until retiring in 1930 and moving to Brooklyn where they lived. Mr. Lyman died in April 1967 and since then she has made her home with her children.

Mrs. Lyman was a member of the Progressive Brethren church of south Brooklyn, over a 50 year member of the Deborah Rebekah Lodge and served over 20 years as recording secretary. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman celebrated their 67th wedding anniversary on October 18, 1966. Mrs. Lyman lived all her life in Poweshiek county.

After a short illness she died Sunday Dec. 21, at the hospital in Sac City at the age of 92 years, 9 months and 16 days.
Mrs. Lyman is survived 91 descendants including her seven children, Cecil and Cloyd of Victor, Mrs. J.F. Hladky of Fort Myers, Fal., Mrs. Wayne Dolmage of Victor, Mrs. Dale Mohr of West Liberty, Mrs. Wayne Heishman of Des Plaines, Ill.; Mrs. T. W. Reida of Lake View, 25 grandchildren, 57 great grandchildren, 2 great great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband, two sisters, one brother, three grandchildren and on great great grandson.
Brooklyn Chronicle

I have just received a copy of the journal that Maude kept from Sherry Bordeuau. I will be adding and correcting information from this into the family file. May 4, 2002. Sherry writes; " Enclosed is the information I mentioned to you in my e-mail. The journal was written and given to my grandmother, Hazel Lyman Dolmage by Maude Keysor Lyman."

From a hand written journal of Maude Mae Keysor Lyman's; The Grinnell Cyclone was June 17th 1882 45 killed in Grinnell 10 killed at Malcom.
The Chicago fire was Oct-8-1871

More About MAUDE MAE KEYSOR:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cem., Victor, Iowa Co., Ia.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for MAUDE M KEYSOR:
The 1900 census, shows that she is living in Jefferson Twp, Powershiek, IA . She has had no children. Resided in Warren Twp, Powershiek, IA in 1910. At that time she was 33 years old, married 10 years, had 5 children with all 5 still living. The 1920 census has her living in Warren Twp, Powershiek, IA and is 42 years old.

[NI4143] Submitted by Janet Swadener-Fertig
Grandmother's, Clara Catherine Coy's, maiden name was Walker. Grandfather Bowles was killed in the farm field when the tractor turned over on him. Jane was proud of him in that he invented things around the farm to make life a little easier and he moved them to the farm when the war started. It was easier to get the essentials if one were a farmer at the beginning of WWII.

[NI4150] More About DILLA ARETRA HIGGINS:
Burial: June 10, 1961, Maple Grove Cemetery, Morrow Co., Oh.

Notes for DILLA ARETRA HIGGINS:
From Morrow Co. Vital Records her year of birth was 1871

[NI4152] Born in 1864. He later immigrated from Luxembourg to the US. Eventually settling in Hastings Minnesota.

[NI4154] Notes for MARGARET EMMA MERCK:
IN MEMORY OF MARGARET E. LYMAN
The daughter of George and Marie Roth Merck, Margaret was born June 19, 1905 in Lincoln Township, Iowa county, Iowa. She was baptized July 16, 1905 at St. John's Lutheran church south of Bictor, and was confirmed May 23, 1920 at St. James Lutheran Church in Victor. She received her early education at St. John's, and graduated from Victor High School in 1925.
Margaret was married on June 19, 1928 to Cloyd Lyman at her family home in Victor. The couple continued to live in Victor, and she was a member of St. James Lutheran church, the women's society of the church, and had served for 65 years as church organist. For many years she taught in the Sunday School of the church.
Margaret is survived by a daughter and her husband, Glorine and robert Berry of Iowa City; two granddaughters and their husbands, Kathy and Lane Warden of Victor, and Christy and Michael Stevens of Iowa City; two great grandchildren, Michael and Lori Warden of Victor; and many nieces and nephews.
Margaret died at the home of her daughter near Iowa City Wednesday morning, May 18, 1988. She was preceded in death by an infant son, Donald Wayne Lyman; her husband, Cloyd, on April 6, 1974; her mother in 1940, her father in 1941; and three brothers and three sisters: Will, Ernest and Arnold Merck; Laura Mattfeld, Lenora Meinke, and Alma Schmidt.
McAninch-Fremming Funeral Home

FUNERAL SERVICES
1:30 PM Friday May 20, 1988
St. James Lutheran Church
Victor, Iowa
OFFICIANT
Rev. Michael H. Holm
St. James Lutheran Church
Victor, Iowa
ORGANIST
Marna Mohr
CONGREGATION SINGING
Hymn #436
"The Lord's My Shepherd, I'll Not Want"
Hymn #200
"I Know That My Redeemer Lives"
Hymn #451
"Stand Up-Stand Up For Jesus"
PALLBEARERS
David Domage Harold Mattfeld
Lawsrence Merck Marvin Merck
William Niebuhur Harold Schmidt
Merlin Schmidt
INTERMENT
Victor Memorial Cemetery
Victor, Iowa
The family will receive friends at St. James Lutheran church following the cemetery services.

More About MARGARET EMMA MERCK:
Burial: Victor Memorial Cem, Victor, Iowa

[NI4155] Football Fans Run in the Family......GO Arturo!!!

UNION-TRIBUNE

September 14, 2006

Joe Klein was monitoring San Diego police scanners Monday evening when officers were sent to check on the welfare of a child heard crying and screaming in a home in the Chollas Creek neighborhood. The report had come in from a neighbor who suspected child abuse.

A few minutes later, Officers Derek Winker and Arturo Swadener arrived at the home on Mary Lou Street. They quickly checked out the scene and reported it was a Code 4, no further assistance needed.

Their explanation followed: It wasn't a baby, it was just a Raiders fan screaming and crying. Apparently the lopsided loss to the Chargers was too much for the Oakland fan to bear.

[NI4175] Notes for GEORGE WASHINGTON KEYSOR:
George and Tamar lived in Brooklyn, Iowa.
Occupation is what was given on the 1860 census for Harmony Township, Morrow, Co., Ohio. He was also a farmer and the 1870 census has him as a teamster.
He had one of his legs amputated. Maude Lyman said it happened when he was 13 and working in the woods. Other family tales say that it happened when he was a teacher. He was carrying a shotgun and climbed over a fence and accidently shot himself in the leg. Later he drank a good amount of whiskey and amputated his own leg. I heard this version from my Great Aunt Anna Norris Balfraith and Blorene Lyman Berry, his granddaughter had heard a similar version. (This came from Dorothy Davis)
Knox Co. later became Morrow Co.

GEORGE W. KEYSOR OBIT
George W. Keysor was born in Marrow County, Ohio, May 24th 1840, and died at his late home in Warren Township March 16, 1908, after a brief illness.
He married Miss Tamar Wiley, March 15, 1866. To this union four children were born, only two daughters surviving at the present time. Besides the two daughters he leaves a sorrowing wife and one brother William Keysor.
The funeral services were held at his late home conducted by Stephen J. Epler, the minister of the Christian Church.
Followed by a large procession of relatives and friends the remains were brought to Brooklyn and interred in the IOOF cemetery.
Brooklyn Chronicle 1908

George moved to Iowa ca 1864 with his family. In an accident he had lost one leg and wore a wooden one. Among the family was the story that at age 13 while climbing over a fence he accidently shot himself and, then or later, cut his own leg off. He had been a farmer, but the 1860 census listed him at age 20 as a school teacher and in the 1870 census he was listed as a teamster. They evidently had a hard time making a living on the Warren Twp. farm. Tamar helped by raising and selling garden produce. This is from Ferne Norris.

In a look up from Erin, from ebay, Civil War Muster Rolls;
George Keysor
Company D
23 Ky. Inf.
Private

George Keysor
Company B
105 Pennsylvanian Inf.
Private


More About GEORGE WASHINGTON KEYSOR:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Brooklyn Cemetery, Poweshiek Co., Iowa
Occupation: Teacher com. school

[NI4186] He was nicknamed "Ted", she "Ada". He worked as a tobacco buyer. Her widowed mother Sarah B. Willey lived with them in 1900. In 1927 he was living on Peach Orchard Road, west of Far Hills Ave. in Oakwood, now a part of Dayton.

[NI4187] Notes for TAMAR RUTH CHAMBERS:
Tamar and George lived in Brooklyn, Iowa

From George's obit it says that he married Miss Tamar Wiley, will have to check and see if she was married before. Her aunt, Tamar Darner married a Wiley. Might have this mixed up. Her obit says she came to Iowa from Indiana. Aunt Tamar Darner Wiley moved to Indiana and maybe Tamar Chambers went with her.

BROOKLYN'S OLDEST RESIDENT PASSES AWAY THURSDAY

Mrs. Tamare Keysor, the oldest citizen of Brooklyn, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Rose Connell, last Thrusday. Mrs. Keysor was ill only a few hours, and her death came suddenly and unexpectedly. She was recognized by all as one of the finest ladies in our community. She has had a long and useful life and leaves, besides the sorrowing family, a host of friends.

Mrs. Tamar Ruth Keysor, daughter of William and Elizabeth Chambers dying November 1, 1934, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Rose Connell. She was 95 years, one month and 27 days old. She came to Poweshiek county from Indiana in 1865 and on March 15, 1866, was married to George Keysor, who died in 1908. To this union were born four children, Mrs. Rose Connell and Mrs. Maude Lyman, both of Brooklyn, Frank, who passed away when he was 19 years old and the first daughter, who died in infancy. There are ten grandchildren and nineteen great grandchildren. She was the last member of a family of ten children to die.

For a number of years she has made her home with her daughters, Mrs. Connell and Mrs. Lyman. Before that Mrs. Keysor lived on farms near Brooklyn where she was always ready to answer the call of the needy and where she won for herself the love of all of her neighbors.
She affiliated hereself with the Baptist church in Ohio when she was 18 years old and remained true to that faith until the time of her decease. Her hope for the future was expressed in the words of the hymn, "The End of the Road;" the words of which were very dear to her heart. Expecially did she rejoice in the line of this hymn which read, "The Face of My Lord I Shall See." Her hope is now being realized.
Funeral services were held from the Church of the Brethren near Brooklyn Sunday afternoon. The Rev. Elmer J. Hutchison of Victor officiated at the funeral services and was assisted by the Rev. D.C. Snider of the Brethren church. Mrs Charles Raffensperger and Mrs. Charles Ferguson of Victor rendered several musical numbers and burial was in the IOOF cemetery at Brooklyn.

Brooklyn Chronicle

BROOKLYN WOMAN CELEBRATES HER 94TH BIRTH DATE 1934
Brooklyn, Ia. Sept. 6--
(Special)--Mrs. Tamar Keysor, Brooklyn's oldest resident, celebrated her 94th birthday with an open house Tuesday at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Dale Mohr. Many relatives and friends called during the afternoon. Mrs. Keysor has been active and is in good health. She has always been active in many social activities of the community. Mrs. Keysor has a wonderful memory and tells her many friends of the pioneer days of Brooklyn and vicinity.

Mrs. Keysor was born in Morrow county, Ohio, Sept. 5, 1839, where she spent her childhood. In 1866 she came to Cedar Rapids, where she was a tailoress. She married George Keysor in 1866 and they moved to Brooklyn, where they lived 15 years. During their residence in Brooklyn four children were born. Two survive, Mrs. George Lyman and Mrs. Lloyd Connell, both of Brooklyn. Mr. and Mrs. Keysor moved to a farm three and a half miles east of Brooklyn, about 1881, where they were engaged in farming. mr. Keysor died in 1908. Since Mr. Keysor's death, Mrs. Keysor has been making her home with her two daughters.

MRS. TAMOR KEYSOR HONORED ON NINETY-FOURTH BIRDAY 1934
Friends and relatives gathered Tuesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Dale Mohr to honor Mrs. Tamor Keysor on her 94th brithday.
Mrs. Keysor makes her home part of the time with her daughters, Mrs. George Lyman and part of the time with another daughter, Mrs. Lloyd Connell. the birthday gathering was held at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Dale Mohr. The afternoon was spent visiting and homemade ice cream and cake were served by granddaughters.

Mrs. Keysor has been a long-time resident of Brooklyn. She came here frist in 1855 when as a girl she drove across the prairie in a covered wagon. She came with friends from her home in Mt. Gillead, O., in 1855. They crossed the Mississippi on a flat boat and came to this county on July 7, 1855. She visited in Brooklyn a short time then. There were only a few log houses. She then went to Cedar Rapids where she had relatives and remained there until she was married on March 15, 1866 to Mr. Keysor. They came almost at once to Brooklyn and settled in town east of where the schoolhouse now stands. She became a member of the Baptist church of Brooklyn and has never changed her church affiliations. After living 15 years in Brooklyn, Mr. and Mrs. Keysor moved to the country on Walnut Creek and settled after one year on the place on Highway No. 6 where Chas. Downey recently lived.

There they farmed and Mrs. Keysor always carried her share in the farm work. They had four children, one dying in infancy, a son who died when 19 years old, and the two daughter's with whom Mrs. Keysor makes her home. Mrs. Keysor was very active when a younger woman and no task was too great for her to undertake. Her kind and helping hand was present in many homes. Now she is still acrive for her years and cheery to meet, interested in the present as well as in the past.

The birthday gathering was apopriately held in one of the first homes in this community, the early home of the Rev. Snyder, the early Dunkard minister here. Mr. Snyder was Mrs. Walter Uhl's grandfather. A lovely angel food cake, baked by Mrs. Hladky, a granddaughter of Mrs. Keysor was presented to her ___pink candles.

Most of her family were present, including her 2 daughters, several of her 11 grandchildren, and several of her 17 great grandchildren. A granddaughter, Mrs. Floyd Lyman and her mother, Mrs. Merch, of Victor, were among the guests. Floyd and Cecil Lyman were unable to be present but their families were there. Other members of the Lyman family who were present were: Mrs. Marie Hladky, and Mrs. Hazel Dolmage, also of Victor. Brs. Dorothy Heishman, Bernice lyman and Mrs. Thelma Mohr, at whose home the gathering was held. Of the Connell family, Mr. and Mrs. __enn Connell were present and Mrs. ___a Jones. Mrs. Gertrude Seamans of Washington was unable to be present. Events of the early days were rel_-lled during the afternoon and the guests left after wishing Mrs. Keysor many more happy birthdays.

Mrs. Keysor is the oldest resident in Brooklyn and we may well be proud of her record.

From a hand written journal by Maude Mae Keysor Lyman:
Decendants of Tamar Ruth Keysor Chambers
1.____________YOST great great great great great great grandmother
2.____________DARNER great great great great great grandmother
3. Elizabeth DARNER CHAMBERS great great great grandmother
4. Tamar CHAMBERS KEYSOR great great grandmother
5. Maude Mae KEYSOR LYMAN great grandmother
6. Cecil LYMAN_______grandfather
7. Margie Ann LYMAN LANDUYT
8. Steven Douglas LANDUYT

CELEBRATES 90TH BIRTHDAY
--Mrs. Tamar Keysor, who is well known in this community, celebrated her ninetieth birthday on Wednesday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lloyd Connell. Last week she suffered a slight stroke but does not seem to be any worse for the experience, as she is gaining rapidly. She was born in Delaware county, Ohio, and has lived in and near Brooklyn since 1865. That is a long time, and we wager that she would be able to tell many interesting experiences about some of the other old settlers. She has two daughters, Mrs. Connell and Mrs. George Lyman of near Carnforth, ten grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.
Source: Brooklyn Chronicle, September 6, 1928

More About TAMAR RUTH CHAMBERS:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Brooklyn Cemetery, Poweshiek Co., Iowa
Nickname: Tamar

[NI4192] Notes for JOY JOAN FONTINEL:
Last name could be spelt Fontinelle

[NI4208] Notes for COLLEEN MAE DOLMAGE:
OBITUARY
Colleen Dolmage, 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Dolmage, living south of Victor on the Poweshiek-Iowa county line in this county, was instantly killed at 5 o'clock Sunday afternooon, when the charge from a 12 gauge shotgun struck her over the heart. Death was accidental, according to Sheriff Fred Cochran, who was called to the scene of the tragedy. Coroner W. B. Phillips could not be ocated until later that night.

Colleen, with her brother, Vernon, 1`4 years of age, had been pheasant hunting and returning home, Colleen took her 410 gauge shotgun to the house where she left it, while her brother went to the barn and turned on the radio.

Colleen came to the barn, opened the half door and in some manner it struck the shotgun still in the hands of her brother, discharging it. The shot entered her body, death being instanttanious.

Funeral services are being said this afternoon from the Methodist church in Victor at 2:00 o'clock.
Mr. and Mr.s Dolmage are the parents of 7 children, the sad death of Colleen being the first break in the family circle.
Montezuma Republican Nov, 4, 1943

More About COLLEEN MAE DOLMAGE:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cem., Victor, Iowa Co., Ia.

[NI4212] Mary Ellen Kohler was born 4 May 1868 in Center twps, Clinton Co., Ind, USA. She died in Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA. Her sealing to parents was submitted. Her baptism was submitted. Her endowment was submitted.

[NI4227] Note for Luciano La Monica:
Atti Di Mascita (Birth Records) for Cerda, Sicily says that he was born on October 23, 1906.
Reference Mormon Microfilm # 1964576

[NI4242] Article copied from newspaper clipping-date unknown.

Headline reads: Youth'S Death Ruled Murder

Corvallis, Oregon [UPI] District Attorney Frank Knight said today a 17-year-old Corvallis high schoolboy, whose body was found in the Willamette River Saturday afternoon, was slain.

The victim was Richard M. Kitchel who had been reported missing for ten days. He had last been seen about 1:30 AM Oct. 12 following a party.

Knight said an autopsy showed the youth apparently was strangled. There were bruises about his face and knuckles indicating he had been in a fight.
__________________________________________________________________________________
E-mail from, Gloria June Swadener-Hall
He was Ralph Kitchel's only child (son). Ralph was our great-uncle Orville's son. Aunt Helen said Ralph and her were close in age and childhood friends. She doesn't know what happened to Ralph.

Gloria

[NI4256] Lone Hill Cemetery
Lewis County, Washington

Lone Hill Cemetery, aka Layton Prairie Cemetery; near Toledo, overlooking
the Cowlitz River on Eadon Road. Lewis County Cemetery District #5
Toledo WA. NW 1/4 of Sec 11 T11N R1W, Established in 1889. 1st recorded
burial 1850.

Zard, Gifford 1918 with Maxine Zard
Zard, Maxine 1920 with Gifford Zard

[NI4290] Called Alfretta in her birth record.

[NI4304] He received his MA degree at the Univiersity of Califonia at Berkeley. Lived on Indian Ripple Road, Dayton.

[NI4339] Submited by Lisa Johnson

Benjamin Franklin (Rev) Connell (Amos, James) was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, February 17, 1832. Benjamin died October 15, 1898 in at his home, Poweshiek County, Ohio, at 66 years of age. Died with paralytic stroke of the brain. His body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. Funeral was held at the Church of Brethren conducted by Rev. George Hopwood, of Deep River, assisted by Rev. I.N. Busby of Brooklyn.

He married Hannah Belle Swaidner in Columbiana, Ohio, March 29, 1859. By Samuel H. Bennett JP. Lived at Georgetown, Ohio until coming to Poweshiek, IA.

__________________________________________________________________________________
Benjamin Franklin Connell was born February 17, 1832 in Columbiana Co. Ohio. As a child Ben was a member of the Sandy Church, which was German Baptist Brethren. Their practices were those of the Dunkards. Ben evidently enjoyed the art of drawing and watercolor. He owned the American Drawing Book by J.G. Chapman published in 1847. It appears that he wanted to think of himself as a “painter”.

He was still living at home in 1850, helping with the farming. Ben married Hannah Swaidner, daughter of David Swaidner and Catherine Clippinger, on March 29, 1859 in Columbiana County , performed by Samuel H. Bennett JP. Hannah was born on March 12, 1836 in Columbiana County . Her father, David Swaidner was one of the early settlers of Butler Township , Columbiana County .

Their first child, Genevra was born on April 28, 1859 . This information is written in either Hannah or Ben’s own handwriting in the Bible pages. This would indicate that it was an “oops” marriage, if the marriage record is correct. That may be why there is no marriage entry for Ben and Hannah in the Bible. The other evidence that may lead toward this is the fact that they were married by a Justice of the Peace and not a minister since Ben’s mother and father appear to have been strong in their religion. Genevra’s obituary states she was born in Dayton , Ohio and not Columbiana County . Did they go to Dayton to get away from the non-approving eye? It must have been very difficult for them both. Ben would lose his mother one year later on May 24, 1860 .

Eighteen sixty finds Ben and Hannah living in Knox Township , Sandy post office district, with their daughter, Genevra. Ben states for the census enumerator that he is a medical student at this time. No property value is listed for him which would indicate he was renting a place to live, but he had a personal value of $498. Ben’s Uncle Aaron was a physician. Did Uncle Aaron try to help Ben at this point? In 1861 he joined the Church of the Brethren. Hannah also became a member about this time. Eighteen sixty one brought them another little girl, Odessa . Two sons were born in the years to follow, Lloyd in 1863 and Quinter in 1866.

Eighteen sixty seven finds the Connell family getting ready to make a very long journey overland. They had photographs taken before they left Ohio and headed out in a Conestoga wagon. The Conestoga was 15’ long, 5’ wide and 5’ deep. It’s spines were made of hickory. More than likely they would have used oxen to pull the wagon since they were more adapt to pulling long distances without food or water. Their final destination was Warren Township , Poweshiek County , Iowa . They may not have traveled alone since brother, Hiram and wife Nancy also became residents of Poweshiek County in 1867. Benjamin’s sister, Maria, had become the second wife to Jacob S. Snyder and they are reported coming to Iowa that same year. Nothing is known as to how long it took them to get there or by what route they took. But, it would have been most likely that they took the River to River Road once they entered Iowa . It went from Davenport thru Iowa City and on to Marengo before they stopped at Brooklyn . This road was heavily used by this time by many traveling West. Why would they have come to the Brooklyn area? The Snyder influence might have much to do with it. Jacob Snyder’s brother, Simon, had come to Brooklyn and started a general store in 1856. Jacob’s uncle Ludwick, was instrumental in the forming of the Church of the Brethren in Pennsylvania and Jacob wanted the church to prosper in other areas. (More on Jacob, Maria and the Church of the Brethren under Maria Connell Snyder). In 1865 Poweshiek County published a promotional brochure to lure people to the county. From Ben’s obituary he initially settled at Brooklyn . How long they were there is not known at this time. But suspicion is that they may have rented the log cabin on the land they eventually purchased.

A little about what Ben and Hannah would have found at Brooklyn when they arrived. Brooklyn is located in Bea r Creek Township . The railroad would have been through Brooklyn at this time since it was completed in 1862. In 1865 the population of Brooklyn was 400 and had jumped to 1,250 by 1870. The bustling town in 1865 had 3 dry good stores, 2 shoe stores, a drug store, lumberyard, grain warehouse, 2 grocery stores, a tin shop, blacksmith and one hotel. Brooklyn did not incorporate until 1869.

Not long after arriving in Brooklyn , they increased the size of their family by one more. Maria Malvina was born July 7, 1868 . The Brooklyn cemetery was laid out in plots in 1868. Unfortunately, Ben and Hannah would require a plot in 1870. Little Maria came down with scarlet fever and died on March 16. Either Ben or Hannah wrote beside two hymns, M. Malvina. Perhaps they were used at her funeral. Or perhaps it was just part of their grieving.

In happier times they may have attended a husking bee hosted by Simon Snyder in 1872. It finished with a square dance. It’s highly unlikely that they participated in the dancing since it was something forbidden in their religion. If Ben wanted to keep his money in a bank he would have had to wait till 1872 when the First National Bank opened at Brooklyn.

On January 21, 1873 , Ben and Hannah purchased 10 acres from Charles and Eliza Uhl for $200.00 in Warren Township Section 19 (E1/2, W1/2, SE1/4, NE1/4). It is located three miles east of Brooklyn on what is now Old Highway 6. First entry for this land of 160 acres was John Moore, private in Capt. Kenton’s, Second Ohio Volunteers on Feb. 11, 1847 , deeded to him by the United States . Edward Griswold was then deeded the land on May 1, 1849 by the United States . In 1854 he started selling off lots. E. Griswold sold to Morris Miller in 1856 followed by E.W. Dee’s purchase in 1864. Charles Uhl purchased the land in 1868. It has been eluded to that a log cabin was already present on the property at the time Ben and Hannah purchased it. As the years passed they built a home just up the hill from the log cabin. Two large evergreens still existed years later, long after the log cabin was gone. They were planted one on each side. The writer remembers sitting between the two evergreens and the eerie sound they produced when the wind blew through them. It was almost as if they had something to say. Timber was shown completely consuming Section 19. Any thoughts of cultivation meant the land would have to be cleared. Nuts trees were not in short supply. They consisted of black walnut and hickory. Wolves were abundant. Their youngest son, Quinter, liked to hunt rabbits in the evening. He decided that wasn’t a good idea after being surrounded by a pack of wolves one evening. He told that was the last time he ever did that. Life in the log cabin may have been cozy, but Quinter told of waking up in the morning to find snow blown in on top of his blanket. Their travel to town would have consisted of traveling two miles west to the Snyder corner, turning north and traveling one mile which crossed Little Bear Creek. Then turning west for another mile before entering the eastern outskirts of Brooklyn . More than likely the trip took a good hour~shorter if you wanted to lather up the horses.

Another little bundle joined the Connell family on August 2, 1877 . A little daughter named Emma arrived. Ben and Hannah appear to continue to prosper. They purchased another 23 ¼ acres adjoining their 10 acres on October 2, 1878 for $425.00. They eventually owned a total of 40 acres. Emma had her picture professionally taken and hand colored. Sadly on January 10, 1879 , Emma died of croup. Again, Emma’s name is placed beside two more hymns. They planted a maple tree to remember her by. Her brother, Quinter, made the following entry in his journal dated December 4, 1941 ; Cut old maple tree down, the one we used to call Emma’s.

In 1880, Ben lists his occupation for the census taker as farmer. Genevra has married, but Odessa , Lloyd and Quinter are all living at home yet. It is listed in 1880, Bear Creek Township had a sorghum mill. As we found in Ben’s father’s letter (Amos), they were making molasses/shuger. From another article which will be addressed under Ben’s son, Quinter, it is stated that Quinter learned the art of sorghum making from his father. Where this sorghum mill would have been is a mystery at this point, but not out of the question that Ben could have traveled to Bear Creek Township since the township is only ½ mile west of Ben’s property. Jacob Snyder owned over 100 acres two miles west of Ben. Could it have been there? Sorghum making usually only required a couple of weeks of very hard work in the late fall.

Ben is listed in his obituary as teaching in the neighborhood school. This would have been the school that was eventually called Warren No. 9 and was one mile south of their homestead. His children went to school there. His youngest son’s children also attended this school. As to what years Ben taught there has not been found yet.

By 1892, Ben had become the Reverend Benjamin Connell. His preaching would have been at the Church of the Brethren on Section 24 of Bear Creek Township. Ben is listed in the Brethren's Family Almanac of 1895 (pg 38) and 1900 (pg 36).

Eighteen ninety-five finds Ben and Hannah with one son left at home, Quinter. Lloyd owned land a couple of miles east of them. Their daughters had married, Genevra to George Kinyon and Odessa to George Wheeler.

Sadly Benjamin didn’t see his 67th birthday. He died at his home from a paralytic stroke of the brain on Saturday, October 15, 1898 . Funeral services were held at the Brethren Church on Sunday, October 16th. Reverend George Hopwood of Deep River conducted the service and assisted by I.N. Busby. Ben was laid to rest next to his two little daughters in the Brooklyn Cemetery . He left behind Hannah, four children and 14 grandchildren.

Fortunately for Hannah her son, Quinter, was still living on the property when Ben died. Quinter had married Becky Niswander, a neighbor girl. They had taken up residence in the old log cabin after marriage.

Hannah’s health turned poor in 1912. She resided with her daughter, Odessa , at Victor for the winter of 1912-13. She died on February 21, 1913 . Funeral services were held on Friday morning at the Church of the Brethren with services conducted by the Rev. Brubaker of Prairie City . She was laid to rest beside her husband and two little daughters. It is reported that Hannah liked to smoke a corn cob pipe. It sat on the ledge of the kitchen until the old house was torn down.

[NI4344] Submitted by Lisa Connell/Jonhson

Lucinda H. Swaidner/Swadener died in 1907. She is buried at North Georgetown Cemetery Knox Twp Columbiana Co. Ohio. The Galbreath she married was Thomas M. Galbreath. He was born Oct. 22, 1827 and died Jan. 1, 1886. He is buried at North Georgetown Cemetery also. I found a biography of his son, Jason. He reports in there that Thomas was a farmer by occupation, and also a lumber dealer, having operated a sawmill for some years, in which enterprise he was quite successful. He served as trustee of Butler township for some time (I found he was trustee in 1865), and was regarded as a very safe and turstworthy official. He was a local politician of considerable note.....

Thomas and Lucinda's children are as follows:
1. Jason Ward born Oct. 1, 1847
2. Sabina married John A. Cobourn
3. Mary married Daniel Borton
4. Sophronia (from Jason's bio it states: Sophronia, who has been a pupil for some years in the deaf and dumb asylum, at Columbus, OH. She is quite a scholarly young lady, though unfortunately deprived of both hearing and speech.
5. Samantha born 1856 Died 1882 buried N. Georgetown Cemetery married John D.
McGaffic. John born 1849 Died 1890 buried N. Georgetown Cemetery.
*One child is buried in their plot with them*
Ida L. McGaffic was born 1877 Died 1888. Buried N. Georgetown
JASON Ward's family follows:
He married Charity Elizabeth Mercer 1873. She was the daughter of Daniel and Eliza Mercer.
1. Mary E. Galbreath b. Oct. 13, 1879; died Jan. 26, 1889 buried N. Georgetown. (She is the little girl at their side in the picture ~ must have been taken not too long before she died)
2. Marion D. Galbreath
3. Jessie F. Galbreath
Jason's bio states.... At the age of twenty-one, as a carpenter and builder, in which he became quite proficient...... After working at this trade three years he purchased a farm, where he now resides(1901), and since that time has given his attention exclusively to the pursuit of agriculture. His improvements are of a high order, and as a farmer he ranks with the best in the township (Butler)..... Politcally Mr. Galbreath is a republican, and in religion belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, as does also his wife.

[NI4360] NOTES: Imprisoned in the Tower of London with his brother, Edward V; never to be seen after 1483.

[NI4383] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Nancy Odessa Connell (Benjamin Franklin (Rev), Amos, James) was born in Columbiana County, Ohio June 26, 1861. Nancy died October 4, 1914 in Powesheik County, Iowa, at 53 years of age.

She married George Wheeler February 1, 1881. George was born January 23, 1862. Geroge died February 24, 1941 at 79 years of age. Per her obit..... present home was Victor, IA., was suddenly stricken with apoplexy at Church of the Brethern one mile east of Brooklyn.... She was removed to the homew of her daughter, Mrs Ed Brennaman where the final summons came at 4 PM the same day. She became a member of the Church of the Brethern, June 25, 1899.

[NI4385] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Perry Elmer Connell was born in Home place, RR Brooklyn, IA, July 9, 1911. Perry died August 30, 1990 in Ottumwa Regional Health Center, Ottumwa, IA, at 79 years of age. His body was interred in Sixteen Cemetery, Ottumwa, IA. He married Treva Ranfield in Marengo, IA February 16, 1938. Treva was born July 6, 1912. Perry engaged in farming most of his life. They made their home on a farm near Brooklyn, later moving to Deep River. In 1944 they moved to farm southeast of Barnes City, where they lived for 40 years. In 1984 they moved to Pleasant Homes in Barnes City. He had been in poor health the last several years following a stoke.

[NI4409] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Orville Ellsworth Connell was born in Brooklyn, IA February 25, 1915. Orville died July 7, 1998 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, at 83 years of age. His bidy is interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA.

He married Viola Mae Weaver in Manhattan, Kansas, December 5, 1942. Viola was born in Iowa County, IA, December 23, 1922. Viola was the daughter of Ernest Weaver and Mary Elizabeth "Molly" Dee. Viola died April 9, 1986 in Brooklyn, IA at 63 years of age. Her body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. Orville bought Quinter's east 80 acres. Farmed until 1960. Carpentered through Union in Iowa City. WWII Veterna in Pacific. Retired May 13, 1977. Viola taught country school and was a salesclerk. Residence was Brroklyn, IA.

[NI4416] Subitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Thomas Quinter Connell (Benjamin Franklin (Rev), Amos, James) was born in Columbiana County, OHIO, February 14, 1866. Thomas died March 15, 1948 in RR Brooklyn, IA, at 82 years of age. Services were held in the Brooklyn Presbyterian Church because ti was too muddy to get into the Chruch of the Brethern. The Rev Earl Deardorff performed the service. Death came after a brief illness following pneumonia. His body was interned in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA.

He married Rebecca Barbara Niswander in Brooklyn, IA January 16, 1896. Rebecca was born in Rockingham County, Virigina, July 7, 1869. Rebeccan was the daughter of Jacob Bird Niswander and Catherine Dorinda Miller. Rebecca died April 6, 1940 in RR Brooklyn, IA at 70 years of age. Her body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. Came to Iowa with his family from Ohio when he was only 6 months old. They made the long trip by covered wagon. He attended the same country school which his father taught for a period of years. Later in life Mr. Connell served as director of this same school for many years. The family first located in Brooklyn and later purchased a farm east of town. On this farm Quinter and his brother, Lloyd, learned the art of making sorghum from their father and continued in this work until 1933 when Quinter and his sons took over the business. Several years after marriage he united with the Church of the brethern. He served in many capacities in the Sunday school and church and remained a deacon until death. After the birth of two sons he bought an acreage of land just east and adjoining his parents' farm where he built a home for his family.

[NI4426] Also listed as Margaret Allen

[NI4430] Notes for VERNA PEARL BRANNIAN:
MRS. GLENN CONNELL DIES AT HER HOME SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Funeral Services Were Held At The Brethren Church Tuesday Afternoon
Mrs. Verna Pearl Copnnell was born at Montezuma, Iowa, December 24th, 1888, and peacefully passed away in her home tree miles east of Brooklyn, Iowa, on March 10th at 2:35 p.m., age 40 years, 2 months and 16days.

Miss Verna Pearl Brannian grew to womanhood in the vicinity of Brooklyn and was united in marriage to Glenn Connell, October 5th, 1913, and aside from the first year of their wedded life they have lived until the present time in the home they now occupy. To this union were born four chidren, Rollin, age 14, Pauline, age 12, Warren, age 7 and John who died October, 1922, at the age of one year and two months.

Mrs. Connell united with the Church of the Brethren December, 1914, and five years later she with her husband were installed into the Deacons office in which position they have been since serving the church faithfully until she was called home. She was also a member of the "Winners" S.S. class, in which there was manifest the same spirit of faithfulness.

It was during last summer that tuburcualr symptoms developed to such a degree that she was advised to take a few month's rest in hopes that this with proper medical aid would overcome her trouble. In harmony with this advice, she dismissed her home responsibilities and took her bed about July 24th, and following this time there seemed to be improvement and in December she was able to be up some and about the house for a few days, then later in the month she was overtaken with the flu, from which time there was a gradual decline and all efforts to aid her seemed to be fruitless until the end came March 10.

She leaves to morn her losss, her husband, three children as named above, one sister Mrs. Maud Mitchell of Brooklyn, eight brothers, Herbert Brannian of Briiklyn, Alvia and Claud Brannnian of Deep River, John and Ross of Brooklyn, Clyde Brannian of Chelsea, and Cecil and Guy also of Brooklyn, besides a host of near relatives and fiends.

Funeral services were conducted from the Brethren Church Tuesday, March 12,at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. J. Schechter officiating, and the body was laid to rest in the IOOF cemetery by the side of the little son who preceded her.

More About VERNA PEARL BRANNIAN:
Burial: I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Brooklyn, Powesheik Co., Iowa
Nickname: Floy

[NI4432] Charles LAVERTY was born on 12 Dec 1860. He died on 5 Nov 1893 in Fort Collins, Colorado. Remained
unmarried.

[NI4442] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Ivan Alton Connell was born in Brooklyn, IA August 24, 1898. Ivan died April 4, 1975, Colorado, at 76 years of age. Heart Attack. His body wasinterred in Sunset Memorial Gardens.

He married Lula Mabel Jamison in Quinter, Kansas, June 26, 1926. Lula was born in Franklin County Virginia, September 7, 1899. Lula died Jne 1, 1990, Colorado at 90 years of age. Ivan was in farming and later oil was discovered on his land in Colorado. Mabel was a professional seamstress. Residence was Kersey, Colorado.

[NI4445] Ruled 1483

[NI4455] Arminta KITCHELL(12) was born on 23 Aug 1873 in Palmyra, Iowa. She died in 1972 in Des Moines,
Iowa. (13) She has record identification number 1159. (3) She has Ancestral File number 22. (4) She never married,
but stayed home as a faithful daughter to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wesley Kitchell and kept house for them during her mother's illness of about 15 years. After her mother's death she kept house for her father until his death.

During all those years she kept in touch with the various branches of the family, passing along letters and family
news, and in a way taking the place of Grandma Esther Kitchel, in keeping members of the family in touch or at
least knowing about almost all other members of the family. Since her father,s death in 1918 she had been a
practical nurse, busily employed, and had made her home most of the time with her nepew and niece, Robert and
Margaret Kitchell.

[NI4460] Notes for LONA MARGARET DUFFUS:
LONA M. CONNELL
Lona M. Connell, 85, of Brooklyn died Thursday morning, Dec. 8, at Brookhaven Nursing Home from complications resulting from cancer. Services were 2:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10, at Nevenhoven Funeral Home in Brooklyn with the REv. Dorie Hanson, Pastor of Grace United Methodist Church, officiating.

Interment was in Brooklyn Cemetery. Memorials may be contributed to the home health care program through Grinnell Hospital.

Lona Margaret Duffus was born Oct. 12, 1909 on the family farm in Madison Township, Poweshiek County, south of Brooklyn; the daughter of A. L. "Rene" and M. Ethel Carmichael Duffus. She attended grade school near the family farm and was a graduate of Victor High School in 1928.

She married Glenn A. Connell June 28, 1930 at the Little Brown Church near Nashua. A son Harold, was born to the couple in 1939. Lona was a homemaker devoted to her family. Her habby was quilting, and throughout her lifetime she produced many fine quilts, all hand-made. During the years that her husband carried the mail, she also substituted for him. He preceded her in death in May of 1975.

Mrs. Connell was a member of the Brooklyn Church of the Brethren where she was active until recent years, the Warren Willing Workers Club (W.W.W., a ladies club in Warren Township), and the Auxiliary of the Rural Letter Carriers' Association.

She is survived by a son Harold of Wichita, Kas., a step-son Warren of Englewood, Colo.; a step-daughter, Pauline Rohrer of Cedar Rapids and two sisters, Pearl Duffus and Marie Duffus both of Des Monies. She is also survived by eight grandchildren; Todd Connell of Wichita, Kas., Steve Connell of Sandy, Utah; Rodney Copnnell of Colorado Springs, Col;Oam Hester of Dedar Rapids; Kipp Connell of San Francisco, Calif.; and Nancy Connell of Hudson, and 11 great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, two brothers, two grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

Casket bearers were Loren Roudabush, Robert McCully, Todd Connell, Randal Rohrer, Eric Niemann and Marvin Koms1994

More About LONA MARGARET DUFFUS:
Burial: December 10, 1994, Brooklyn Cemetery, Brooklyn, Poweshiek Co., Iowa

[NI4462] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

William Quinter Connell was born July 3, 1930. He married unknown 1980. Bill is in farming. Resides in Warrenvill, IL.

[NI4464] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Floyd was born in Hitchcock, SD, June 20, 1893. Floyd was an auto mechanic and mail carrier. Moved Corvallis to Klamath Falls, OR in 1927. Floyd remarried and lived in San Ramon, CA.

[NI4466] Wallace J. KITCHEL was born on 28 Nov 1916 in Buffalo, Wyoming. (35) Lives on the Kitchel family
ranch south of Buffalo with his sister, Helen Catherine as of 1963. He never married. He has been a farmer and
stockman all his life. He has record identification number 1660. (3) He has Ancestral File number 65.(4)

[NI4491] Subitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Lloyd David Connell (Benjamin Franklin (Rev), Amos, James) was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, December 29, 1863. Llyod died November 28, 1935 in Poweshiek County, IA, at 71 years of age. His body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA.

He married Rozella "Rose" Gertrude Keysor December 20, 1888. Rozella was born in Poweshiek County, IA August 17, 1868. Rozella died December 21, 1954 at 86 years of age. Her body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. 1895 Census, Scott Township Powesheik County, IA: Lloyd age 31, born Ohio; Rose age 26, born Poweshiek County, IA; Glenn age 3, born Poweshiek County, IA; Gertrude age 1, born Poweshiek County, IA.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for LLOYD DAVID CONNELL:
From Dorothy Davis, his birth was December 27, 1863.
Lloyd Davie Connell, son of Benjamin F. Connell and Hannah B. Connell, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, December 29, 1863, and departed this life November 28, 1935, at the age of 71 years, 10 months and 29 days.

In his early childhood he moved with his parents ot Brooklyn, Iowa, where they resided a few months and then removed to the Connell homestead which was just west of the Quinter Connell home. He received his education in the rural school.

On December 20, 188, he was united in marriage to Rose Keysor. To this union were born foru children, Glenn A. Connell of Brooklyn; Mrs. Gertrude M. Siemens of Seattle, Washinton; Mrs. Ina Jones of Brooklyn and Harold B. who passed away in 1922. He was also preceded in death by his two sisters, Mrs. Odesra Wheeler and Mrs. Genevia Kenyon.

After his marriage he made his home on a farm neart Carnforth. In the fall of 1894 he moved to his late home, where he had resided for the last 40 years. He was a member of The Church of The Brethren and faithfully filled his office as deacon. He was a public spirited man and had served as township clerk and also as school treasurer for a number of years. He took a great deal of pride in performing the duties of his offeces, which he did in a very commendable manner.

He was a devoted husband, a kind and living father and an excellent neighbor. He will be greatly missed by his family, friends and neighbors. He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, three children, five grandchildren, on brother, Quinter Connell of Brooklyn, besides many other relatives and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held Sunday, Dec. 1st from the Church of the Brethren, conducted by Dr. S. B. Miller of Cedar RApids assisted by Rev. _ W. Elkenberry of Dallas Center. Pallbearers were C.E. Willett, Walter ______, W.B. Rhinehart, Ray Robey, Sam Wernerland and Walter Fraser. The remains were laid to rest in the IOOF cemetery.

[NI4501] Submitted by Lisa Connell-Johnson

Sophronia (from Jason's bio it states: Sophronia, who has been a pupil for some
years in the deaf and dumb asylum, at Columbus, OH. She is quite a scholarly young
lady, though unfortunately deprived of both hearing and speech.

[NI4509] Husband: Johan Peter HAUCK

Birth: abt 1720 Lagenbach, Paltiinate, Germany
Chr: 13 Feb 1720 Baumholder Reformed Church, Lagenbach, P
Death: abt 1761 Bucks/Berks Co., Pennsylvania
Father: Hans Jacob HAUCK
Mother: Margaretha Barbara LOCH
================================================
Wife: Ana Maria SCHWEDNER

Father: Johan Martin SCHWEDENER
Mother:
Other spouse: Thomas WINKLER
Children
1 M Nicholas HAUCK
Birth: 9 Sep 1749 Berks Co., Pennsylvan
Chr: 15 Apr 1750 Zions Moslem Church, Richmond twp., Berk
Death: 6 Aug 1841 Rockcastle Co., Kentuc
Spouse: Sarah MOUSER (m 1772)

2 F Ana Maria HAUCK
Birth: 16 Nov 1746 Berks Co., Pennsylvan
Chr: 6 Feb 1747 Zion Lutheran (Moslem) Church, Greenwich
Spouse: Jacob or Johann Frederick MOUSER (m 25 Dec 1764)

3 M Michael HAUCK

4 M Barnet HAUCK
Spouse: Barbara

5 M George HAUCK

6 M John HAUCK
Spouse: Catherine COUNCE

7 M Jacob HAUCK

8 M Michael HAUCK
Spouse: Mariah Elizabeth KILLIAM

9 M Felix HAUCK

FAMILY NOTES

HUSBAND NOTES: Johan Peter HAUCK General: Arrived with family at Port of Philadelphia 3 Sep 1739 on the Loyal Judith.

"Anna Maria Schwedener had arrived at the port of Philadelphia PA with her father, John Martin Schwedener, on
16 Sep 1738 on the Queen Elizabeth from the Palatinate, eleven months and seventeen days prior to the arrival of John Peter Hauck and parents and sisters."

WIFE NOTES: Ana Maria SCHWEDNER General: Arrived with family on 16 Sep 1738 on the Queen Elizabeth from the Paltinate at the Port of Philadelphia. "Anna Maria Schwedener had arrived at the port of Philadelphia PA with her father, John Martin Schwedener, on 16 Sep 1738 on the Queen Elizabeth from the Palatinate, eleven months
and seventeen days prior to the arrival of John Peter Hauck and parents and sisters."

Following the death of Johan Peter Hauck, Anna Maria married Thomas Winkler and with her eight children removed with hms to Rowan County, North Caorlina.

CHILD NOTES: Nicholas HAUCK General: Baptismal sponsors were Nicholaus Kutz and Catherine Grimm

CHILD NOTES: Ana Maria HAUCK General: Michel Schwedner and wife Ana Marie are listed as sponsors for Ana
Maria 'Haak' dau of Peter H and Ana Maria aged '11 wks tomorrow' bapt. 6 Feb 1747. This came from Zion Lutheran (Moselem) Church records of Greenwich tsp, Berks Co PA.

[NI4530] Robert Morris KITCHELL was born on 17 Feb 1878 in Palmyra, Iowa. He died in Dec 1965 in South
Dakota.(25) He has record identification number 1162.(29) He has Ancestral File number 24.(4) Robert farmed in
South Dakota, but moved into Ipswich, S.D., where he lived for many years. He and his sons have a truck line with
offices at Ipswich, S.D. and St. Paul, Minn.
Robert and Grace celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniv. at their home on Nov. 22, 1952. All their five children and
families were present.

He was married to Grace BIGGS (daughter of John BIGGS and Adaline BIGGS) on 27 Nov 1901 in Winterset, Iowa.
Grace BIGGS has record identification number 1163. (3) She has record identification number. Robert Morris
KITCHELL and Grace BIGGS had the following children:

+67 i. Helen KITCHELL.
+68 ii. Morris Lester KITCHELL.
+69 iii. Mary Adaline KITCHELL.
+70 iv. Robert John KITCHELL.
+71 v. Maxine KITCHELL.

[NI4562] Mary Elizabeth KITCHEL was born on 24 Feb 1848 in Crown Point, Indiana. She died on 4 Sep 1935 in Fort
Collins, Colorado. She was buried in Fort Collins, Colorado. She has record identification number 724.(3) Mary and
Herbert moved in 1881 from Altoona, Iowa to the Lewis farm six miles east of Fort Collins.

She was married to Herbert Merritt LEWIS (son of Seth LEWIS and Elizabeth GOODWIN) on 15 Oct 1868 in Palmyra,
Iowa. Herbert Merritt LEWIS was born on 17 Apr 1843 in Barry County, Michigan. He died on 30 Sep 1908 in Fort
Collins, Colorado. He was buried in Fort Collins, Colorado. He has record identification number 725.(3) Mary Elizabeth
KITCHEL and Herbert Merritt LEWIS had the following children:

+38 i. Ida Maud LEWIS.
+39 ii. Seth Curtis LEWIS.
+40 iii. Alta Esther LEWIS.
41 iv. Stephen Goodwin LEWIS was born on 14 Jun 1877 in Altoona, Iowa. He died on 30 Oct 1946 in
Timnath, Colorado. He has record identification number 3636. (
42 v. William Garfield LEWIS was born on 1 May 1880 in Altoona, Iowa. He died on 12 Apr 1958 in
Huntington Beach, Calif.. He has record identification number 3637.(
43 vi. James Herbert LEWIS was born on 9 Jun 1882 in Fort Collins, Colorado. He died on 8 Nov 1958 in Fort
Collins, Colorado. He has record identification number 3638.(3)

[NI4582] Notes for HARVEY TESAR JONES:
In c1990 he lived in a retirement center in Brooklyn, quite elderly and deaf but very pleasant, from Ferne Norris.

More About HARVEY TESAR JONES:
Burial: Brooklyn, Powesheik Co., Iowa
Occupation: Farmer

[NI4587] Clement Bates

Embarked from London, England for America aboard the ship "Elizabeth", captained by William Stagg April 6, 1635. With
Clement, who was 40 years old at the time, was his wife Anna, also 40, and their five children. Clement came to Hingham about
the time that Rev. Peter Hobart and his followers arrived, and, on the 18th of September, 1635, he received a grant of land on
Town (South) St. This lot contained five acres and was bounded on the N.E. by George Russell, and S.W. by Thomas Johnson.
It was the fifth in number from Bachelor (Main) St. and was in possession of his descendants for nearly 250 years. In 1883, the
estate, including the ancient dwelling house fromerly known as the "Anchor Tavern", was sold to the owners of the adjoining
land. A portion of the estate was repurchased later, and a new house was built there by a descendant.

[NI4595] Ruled from 1483-1485

[NI4601] Submitted by Lucy Funk in an e-mail to Jeanne Yoakam

An obituary for a daughter of Jacob and Barbara Swaidner appears in the St. Joe News for October 23, 1919. The mention in the history books was regarding this daughter and a write up of Nelson Scholes, her husband.

"Death has again visited our community and taken from us one of its oldest residents, Mrs. Mary A. Scholes, daughter of Jacob and Barbara Swaidner. She was born near Salem, Ohio, July 18, 1831 and died in St. Joe, October 15, 1919, aged 88 years, 2 months and 27 days.

The deceased was united in marriage to Nelson Scholes, September 5, 1852 in Ashland County, Ohio. Mr. Scholes preceded her in death September 10, 1910. To this union were born six children, two sons and four daughters. Mrs. Emma Abel, Auburn, Indiana. Mrs. Flora Tustison, St. Joe, J. N. Scholes, Johnston, PA, and Elida Scholes deceased. John Scholes, son of Nelson Scholes by a former marriage was so nearly associated with these children as to form one famiygroup and to him the deceased gave all of the care common to motherhood.

Mrs. Scholes united with the Christian Church at Coburn's Corner and was baptised by the late Rev. L. L. Carpenter. During the last few years she had live and worshipped in St. Joe, but continued her membership with the church at Coburn's Corners until called by death.

The funeral service was conducted in the St. Joe Christian Church October 17, 1919, by Rev. T. A. Manley. Her mortal remains were laid to rest in the Alton cemetery, E. R. Kinsey, direct. A mother in Israel has gone but will never be forgotten.

[NI4613] Submitted by Lori Hellmund

This appears in a Montgomery County History also, however, I do not have the name of the book.
"Daniel Swadner, farmer, PO Horatio; was born in Montgomery Co., OH in 1820; was the son of Henry and Eleanor Swadner, who were born in Maryland; they had nine children, viz., Mary Jane, Daniel, Samuel, Sarah Ann, Elizabeth,Clarinda, Lavina, Charlotte, and Henry; Eleanor's father was Jacob Suman. Mr. Swadner was married in 1859 to Margaret Bobo, born in 1822, daughter of John and Elizabeth Waltz, and was born in Montgomery County.; her father John was born in Maryland, and her mother in Pennsylvania. Mrs. Swadner was a widow, being first married to John Bobo, by whom she had one child, viz., John L., who is now living. Mr. Bobo died in 1851 while crossing the plains on his way to California. They are the parents of two children, viz., Henry A. and Samuel F. Mr. Swaner moved to this county in 1869, upon the farm he now lives upon, consisting of 80 acres; when he came here, there were about 20 acres cleared; now he has 55 acres cleared and in good cultivation, and has put up all the buildings, having a good two story frame house and good barn, and has had to make his own fortune, starting without capital, but by industry and diligence in business, has a good farm and a competency for comfortable living. Mr. Swadner is a member of the Reformed Church; has belonged to the same some forty years; his wife belongs to the Lutheran, having joined them about forty years ago, also. Thus, while we here see one who has made a good record, in the work of acquiring property and the comforts of life, we also see a long service in the church, and their example will stand as a bright and shining light for their children's children for ages to come. "

[NI4614] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Guy Calvin Connell was born in Brooklyn, IA December 28, 1899. Guy died January 3, 1980 in Edward Hospital, Naperville, IL, at 80 years of age. His body was interred in Woodlawn Cemetery, Forest Park, IL.

He married Anna Phillip in Chicago, IL, September 12, 1926. Anna was born August 13, 1905. He was a residnet of Naperville, IL, since 1938 and engaged in farming for 41 years. His last residence was 26W251 Warrenville Road.

[NI4618] Biography of Philip D. Ginder, page 986. History of De Kalb County, Indiana. Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, 1885.

Philip D. Ginder, farmer and stock-raiser, section 27, Wilmington Township, was born in Ashland County, Ohio, March 7, 1846, a son of Jacob Ginder, who settled on section 27 in 1854, and now lives across the street from his
first settlement, on section 22. He was reared a farmer and has always followed that vocation. He lives on apart of the land entered by his father, and in connection with his own cultivates his father’s farm. He owns forty acres of valuable land. His residence is a fine two-story brick, the main part 18x28 feet, with a one-story L 24x26 feet. He has the finest barn in the township. It is 36x62 feet in size, and eighteen feet high. Mr. Ginder was married in January, 1871, to Sarah C. Swaidner, daughter of John Swaidner, of Hicksville, Ohio. To them were born two children; but one, Mary A., is living. Sarah is deceased. Mrs. Ginder died Sept. 4, 1873, and April 16, 1874, Mr. Ginder married Martha McDannell, daughter of David McDannell. To them have been born five children, but three of whom are living---Jacob L., Inez B. and Zantha A. Ida and an infant daughter are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Ginder are member of the United Brethren church.

Submitted by:
Arlene Goodwin
Auburn, Indiana
Agoodwin@ctlnet.comm

[NI4641] 77. Benjamin6 Parkhurst (Benjamin5, George4, John3, Christopher2, George1) was born in Elizabethtown, Essex
County, NJ about 1681. Benjamin died about 1722 in Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ.

He married Mercy Thom(p)son in Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ, about 1705. Mercy was born in
Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ about 1685. Mercy was the daughter of Hur Thom(p)son and Mary Unknown.
Mercy died after 1721 in Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ. Thom(p)son siblings, John and Mercy, married
Parkhurst siblings, Benjamin and Martha.

Benjamin's occupation: Weaver in Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ. He made a will in Elizabethtown, Essex
County, NJ, December 9, 1721. Benjamin participated in the Prob of Est: event December 8, 1722 in
Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ. Benjamin lived his entire life in Elizabethtown, NJ probably on the
homestead inherited from his father.

Benjamin named his wife, Mercy, his three daughters, Martha, Mary, and hannah ahd his three sons,
Benjamin, Samuel, and John in his will dated 9 December 1721 in the stated order.

Benjamin Parkhurst and Mercy Thom(p)son had the following children:

+ 159 i. Martha7 Parkhurst was born about 1707.

+ 160 ii. Benjamin Parkhurst was born November 20, 1713.

+ 161 iii. Samuel Parkhurst was born about 1715.

+ 162 iv. John Parkhurst was born about 1717.

+ 163 v. Mary (Mercy) Parkhurst was born before 1721.

164 vi. Hannah Parkhurst was born in Elizabethtown, Essex County, NJ before 1722. Nothing is known about
Hannah other than she is named in her father's will.

[NI4650] Alva Smith KITCHEL was born on 12 Mar 1915 in Sheridan, Wyoming. He died on 29 Dec 1993 in Dillon,
Montana. He served in the military Jan. 1942 to Nov. 1943. Served with the Army's 53rd Infantry Regiment in Alaska. Received a medical discharge because of back injuries while on a routine patrol. He was buried in Anaconda, Montana.

He has record identification number 1674.(3) Lived on Burkett Street in Sheridan,Wyo. after his dad, Oliver Kitchel sold the homestead on Buffalo Creek in Sheridan County, Wyo. Alva worked for Garrison Const. in the 1930's for 4 cents a day. Helped in the construction of Wyoming Highway 14 by Jim Creek Hill, the work at that time was done with horse drawn equipment. Alva and Rose with their two oldest sons, Aaron and Bruce moved to Anaconda, Mont. in 1952 where Alva worked for the Anaconda Copper Company at their copper smelting facility until he retired in April of 1977.

He was married to Rose Marie BARHAM (daughter of Marie WATTENBERG) on 21 Nov 1947. Rose Marie BARHAM
was born on 2 Oct 1925 in Kleenburn, Wyoming. She has record identification number 1676. (3) Alva Smith KITCHEL
and Rose Marie BARHAM had the following children:

+176 i. Aaron Kent KITCHEL.
+177 ii. Bruce Craig KITCHEL.
+178 iii. Cameron Oliver KITCHEL.

[NI4651] E-mail from Sherry, Lisa's Mom - July 11, 2004

Last Thursday evening Joe got a call from Justin. At first, I was worried something was wrong. Oh, but it seems everything is right!! He asked permission from Joe to propose to our daughter Lisa!! Then he asked me. I almost cried. What a gentleman! He said his grandfather told him if he was going to do it to do it right.

Now we have a wedding to plan!!

Lisa and Justin were introduced by mutual friends while they were both going to different colleges. The last 2 1/2 years they have attended WSU. Justin graduated in June with a degree in Business Management. Lisa has two years left on her Doctor of Pharmacy degree.

They moved to Liberty Lake, a suburb of Spokane, in June. Justin began working for Ferguson Enterprises after graduation. Lisa works as a Pharmacy Intern for the Safeway Corp.

This is the e-mail Lisa sent me:



Hello everyone!!!

Well today Justin took me on a picnic to a winery here in Spokane. He had secret plans to propose to me! I must say I was pleasantly surprised!!! He had a cute picnic basket with meats, cheeses, fruits and bread. It was very sweet. Then he popped the question and I, of course, said yes. I have attached pics of the ring he bought me...Just thought I'd share the great news.

Love ya-
Lisa

[NI4654] Ruled from 1413 to 1422.

[NI4660] Harriet KITCHEL (15) (photo) was born on 22 Jan 1844 in Crown Point, Indiana. She died on 2 Jul 1943 in
Fort Collins, Colorado. She was educated at Simpson College before the Civil War in College Springs, Iowa.
She has record identification number 719. Prior to her second marriage to Montgomery McCormick she had
taught school seven years. As a girl she joined the Methodist Church and was baptised in the South River
when they had to cut the ice for the immersion. Throughout her long life sha remained an active Christian, a
Methodist, an abolitionist, and a staunch prohibitionist, and had been active for women Suffrage and the
W.C.T.U. Montgomery and Harriet moved in 1880 to a farm 5 miles south of Stanton, iowa, where they lived
until 1891 when they moved to College Springs, Iowa to give their children better school advantages.
After selling the place and closing up affairs at College Springs, Harriet lived wity her children and near
relatives until her death at Fort Collins, Colo. On account of war conditions, no space on trains except for
soldiers, no tires or gasoline available making it impossible for transportation to Indianola for burial there.
She was buried in Grand View Cemetery at Fort Collins in the plot of her son, James G. McCormick.

She was married to Sidney A. GAYLOR (son of John B. GAYLOR) on 23 Dec 1863. Sidney A. GAYLOR has
record identification number 720.(3) Harriet KITCHEL and Sidney A. GAYLOR had the following children:

+29 i. John Burns GAYLOR.

She was married to Montgomery MCCORMICK (son of James MCCORMICK and Jane MCHENRY) on 4 Sep 1871
in Palmyra, Iowa. Montgomery MCCORMICK was born on 17 Jul 1843 in Spencer, Indiana. He was born on
the site of the McCormick Creek State Park He died on 22 Feb 1914 in College Springs, Iowa. He was buried in
Indianola, Iowa. He has record identification number 721.(3) Montomery served as a private for 3 years and 4
months during the Civil War in Copamy A, 59th Ind. Vol. Infantry. Was in many battles and skirmishes from
Shilo through the Vicksburg Campaign, around Chattanooga,the Atlantic Campaign and Sherman's march to
the Sea. Also went with the Army to Washington and participated in the Grand Review on Pennsylvania Ave.
Soon after returning from the Army he married Margaret Dunn at Spencer. They moved to Sandyville, Iowa in
1867. She died in a year leaving an infant dau. Margaret McCormick, who grew up and married Charles
Hornady. They had one dau. Gladys, born in 1899, who is now Mrs. Harry Reynoids, New Virginia, Iowa. No
children. Harriet KITCHEL and Montgomery MCCORMICK had the following children:

+30 i. George Chalmers MCCORMICK.
+31 ii. James Garfield MCCORMICK.
+32 iii. Jennie Esther MCCORMICK.

[NI4667] Biography

The Prince of Wales, eldest son of The Queen and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, was born at Buckingham Palace at 9.14pm on 14th November 1948.

A proclamation was posted on the Palace railings just before midnight, announcing that Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth had been safely delivered of a son. It was announced later that the baby Prince weighed 7lb 6oz.

On 15th December, Charles Philip Arthur George was christened in the Music Room at Buckingham Palace, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Geoffrey Fisher.

The Prince's mother was proclaimed Queen Elizabeth II at the age of 25, when her father, King George VI, died aged 56 on 6th February 1952. On The Queen's accession to the throne, Prince Charles - as the Sovereign's eldest son - became heir apparent at the age of three.

The Prince, as Heir to The Throne, took on the traditional titles of The Duke of Cornwall under a charter of King Edward III in 1337; and, in the Scottish peerage, of Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick, Baron Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and Prince and Great Steward of Scotland.

The Prince was four at his mother's Coronation, in Westminster Abbey on 2nd June 1953. Many who watched the Coronation have vivid memories of him seated between his widowed grandmother, now to be known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, and his aunt, Princess Margaret.

The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh decided that The Prince should go to school rather than have a tutor at the Palace. The Prince started at Hill House school in west London on 7th November 1956.

After 10 months, the young Prince became a boarder at Cheam School, a preparatory school in Berkshire. In 1958 while The Prince was at Cheam, The Queen created him The Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester. The Prince was nine-years-old.

In April 1962 The Prince began his first term at Gordonstoun, a school near Elgin in Eastern Scotland which The Duke of Edinburgh had attended.

The Prince of Wales spent two terms in 1966 as an exchange student at Timbertop, a remote outpost of the Geelong Church of England Grammar School in Melbourne, Australia.

When he returned to Gordonstoun for his final year, The Prince of Wales was appointed school guardian (head boy). The Prince, who had already passed six O Levels, also took A Levels and was awarded a grade B in history and a C in French, together with a distinction in an optional special history paper in July 1967.

The Prince went to Cambridge University in 1967 to read archaeology and anthropology at Trinity College. He changed to history for the second part of his degree, and in 1970 was awarded a 2:2 degree.

He was invested as Prince of Wales by The Queen on 1st July 1969 in a colourful ceremony at Caernarfon Castle. Before the investiture The Prince had spent a term at the University College of Wales at Aberystwyth, learning to speak Welsh.

On 11th February 1970, His Royal Highness took his seat in the House of Lords.

On 8th March 1971 The Prince flew himself to Royal Air Force (RAF) Cranwell in Lincolnshire, to train as a jet pilot. At his own request, The Prince had received flying instruction from the RAF during his second year at Cambridge.

In September 1971 after the passing out parade at Cranwell, The Prince embarked on a naval career, following in the footsteps of his father, grandfather and both his great-grandfathers.

The six-week course at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, was followed by service on the guided missile destroyer HMS Norfolk and two frigates.

The Prince qualified as a helicopter pilot in 1974 before joining 845 Naval Air Squadron, which operated from the Commando carrier HMS Hermes. On 9th February 1976, The Prince took command of the coastal minehunter HMS Bronington for his last nine months in the Navy.

On 29th July 1981, The Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer in St Paul's Cathedral who became HRH The Princess of Wales.

The Princess was born on 1st July 1961, at Park House on The Queen's estate at Sandringham, Norfolk. She lived there until the death in 1975 of her grandfather, the 7th Earl, when the family moved to the Spencer family seat at Althorp House in Northamptonshire.

Lady Diana's father, then Viscount Althorp and later the eighth Earl Spencer, had been an equerry to both George VI and The Queen. Her maternal grandmother, Ruth, Lady Fermoy, was a close friend and lady in waiting to The Queen Mother.

The Prince and Princess of Wales had two sons: Prince William, born on 21st June 1982; and Prince Harry, born on 15th September 1984.

From the time of their marriage, The Prince and Princess of Wales went on overseas tours and carried out many engagements together in the UK.

On 9th December 1992, the Prime Minister, John Major, announced to the House of Commons that The Prince and Princess of Wales had agreed to separate.

The marriage was dissolved on 28th August, 1996. The Princess was still regarded as a member of the Royal Family. She continued to live at Kensington Palace and to carry out her public work for a number of charities.

When The Princess was killed in a car crash in Paris on 31st August 1997, The Prince of Wales flew to Paris with her two sisters to bring her body back to London. The Princess lay in the Chapel Royal at St James's Palace until the night before the funeral.

On the day of the funeral, The Prince of Wales accompanied his two sons, aged 15 and 12 at the time, as they walked behind the coffin from The Mall to Westminster Abbey. With them were The Duke of Edinburgh and The Princess's brother, Earl Spencer. Click here to visit the memorial site.

The Prince of Wales asked the media to respect his sons' privacy, to allow them to lead a normal school life. In the following years, Princes William and Harry, who are second and third in line to the throne, accompanied their father on a limited number of official engagements in the UK and abroad.

On 9th April 2005, The Prince of Wales and Mrs Parker Bowles were married in a civil ceremony at the Guildhall, Windsor.

After the wedding, Mrs Parker Bowles became known as HRH The Duchess of Cornwall.

The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall were joined by around 800 guests at a Service of Prayer and Dedication at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.

The Service was followed by a reception at Windsor Castle hosted by Her Majesty The Queen. It is intended that The Duchess of Cornwall should use the title HRH The Princess Consort when The Prince of Wales accedes to The Throne.

The Duchess supports The Prince of Wales in his work. Through the years, His Royal Highness developed a wide range of interests which are today reflected in 'The Prince's Charities', a group of 17 not-for-profit organisations of which The Prince of Wales is President. Fourteen of the 17 Charities were founded personally by The Prince.

The group is the largest multi-cause charitable enterprise in the United Kingdom, raising over £110 million annually.

The organisations are active across a broad range of areas including opportunity and enterprise, education, health, the built environment, responsible business, the natural environment and the arts. Click here to read more about The Prince's Charities.

These interests are also reflected in the list of around 360 organisations of which he has since become Patron or President.

The Prince's concerns about developments in fields such as architecture, the inner cities, education, religion, health and farming have been elaborated over many years in a large number of speeches and articles.
___________________________________________________________________________________
The Prince of Wales's life and work are funded predominantly by the Duchy of Cornwall.

All the private and the large majority of the official and charitable activities of The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall are funded by The Prince’s annual private income from The Duchy of Cornwall estate.

Since it was established in 1337 by Edward III for his eldest son Prince Edward, the Duchy's main purpose has been to provide an income for the Heir to the Throne. Under the 1337 charter, and as confirmed by subsequent legislation, The Prince of Wales is not entitled to the proceeds or profit on the sale of the Duchy’s capital assets, but only to its annual income.

Today, the estate consists of around 54,764 hectares of land in 22 counties, mostly in the South-West of England, and includes agricultural, residential and commercial property holdings. It also has a financial investment portfolio.

The Prince of Wales chooses to use the majority of his after-tax income from the Duchy to meet the cost of his public and charitable work. In addition, each year he helps raise, directly or indirectly, around £110 million for his core 17 charities.

The Prince pays tax on his Duchy income, after the normal deductions for business expenses, at the 40 per cent rate. Like any other tax-payer, his tax return is subject to review by the Inland Revenue. In 2005-06, The Prince’s income from the Duchy was £14.1 million and £10.8 million after tax (including VAT).
____________________________________________________________________________________
NOTES: Charles was born on a Sunday at 9:14 pm and weighed 7lb. 6oz. HRH The Prince of Wales. When Elizabeth II ascended the throne, Charles automatically became Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick, Baron Renfrew, Lord of the Isles and Great Steward of Scotland, Knight of the Garter. Charles was christened: Charles Philip Arthur George. He was created Prince of Wales in 1958 and invested as such in 1969 on his coming of age. He assumed his seat in the House of Lords in February 1970 and became the first to the British Crown to earn a university degree when he was graduated with honors from the University of Cambridge in June 1970. University of Cambridge in June 1970. Like his father, he should properly be addressed as "Your Royal Highness" the first time and "Sir" thereafter. He does not care to be called, Prince (an American custom). He thinks it makes him sound like a police dog. He doesn't mind being called Charles or Charlie. Charles is an opera lover and is president of the Friends of the Royal Opera House. He is 5' 11" tall.

[NI4669] Robert John KITCHELL (58) was born on 21 Sep 1920. He has record identification number 1654.(3) He has
Ancestral File number 65.(4) Robert joined the Marines in Sept. 1942, received boot training at San Diego and was
sent to Pacific activities.

He was married to Gleva PETERSON (daughter of Alfred PETERSON and Beulah PETERSON) on 18 Dec 1948. Gleva
PETERSON has record identification number 1655.(3) Robert John KITCHELL and Gleva PETERSON had the
following children:

162 i. Carol Jean KITCHELL was born on 14 Jul 1951. She has record identification number 2167.(3)
163 ii. Kay Lynette KITCHELL was born on 8 Oct 1954. She has record identification number 2168.(3)

[NI4679] Immigrated 10 September 1731 on "Penn Merchant" Alone on ship manifest.

[NI4682] Submitted by Scott Barnes
they are both buried at Chapel Lutheran Church near Libertytown, Frederick Co., MD. Their son Adam Nusbaum is also buried at Chapel.

[NI4691] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Ada Alice Connell was born in Brooklyn, IA, November 29,1901. Ada died February 16, 1991 at 89 years of age.

She married Silver James Cummins in Brooklyn, IA, September 21, 1924. Silver was born in Java, South Dakota, September 18, 1896. Silver was the son of Albert Cummins and Phoebie Fristoe. Silver died August 14, 1975 in Sebring, Florida, at 78 years of age. His body was interred in Pinecrest Cemetery, Serbing, Floridia. He was raised in Barnum, Minnesota, where he joined the Church of the Brethern. During WWI he served in the Army as a non-combatant in the medical service. He entered Bethany Bible School, finishing in 1925. they moved to Maywood, IL where he served as an ordained deacon in the First Church of the Brethern in Chicago. Later moved to Earlville, IL where they owned and managed a hotel until retirement. Hotel owners in Earlville, IL. Retired to Sebring, Floridia

[NI4693] Notes for WILLIAM JOHN SIEMENS:
Journal of Maude Mae Keysor Lyman has his last name spelt Siemens and I had is spelt Simens. The marriage announcement has Siemens.

WILLIAM SIEMENS 07 Mar 1888 Jun 1976 98382 (Sequim, Clallam, WA) (none specified) 531-32-8264 Washington

Martin County Minnesota residents who served in World War 1 Originally Compiled by Arthur M. Nelson Published by Sentinel Publishing Company, Fairmont Minnesota, 1920 Transcribed by Charles Deutsch First Name Last Name Branch Rank DateofBirth PlaceofBirth
William John Siemens Army Private 03/07/1888 South Dakota


More About WILLIAM JOHN SIEMENS:
Military service: WWI, Army
Occupation: Osteopathic Doctor

[NI4722] NOTES: Lady Diana Spencer (before her marriage to Charles) was popularly known as: "Shy Di". Diana Spencer's ancestry (through her father) links her with more than one King and she and Prince Charles are 16th cousins, once removed. Diana weighed 7 lbs. 12 oz. at birth. She is 5' 10" tall, has blond hair and blue eyes. Diana's descent from Frank Work links her with many famous Americans: George Washington, John Adams (2nd U.S. Pres.), The Roosevelt family, Calvin Coolidge, John Pierpont Morgan, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Louisa M. Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Gloria Vanderbilt, Erle Stanley Gardner, General George Patton, George Gallup (of Gallup polls fame) Nelson Bunker Hunt, Orson Welles, Humphrey Bogart and Lee Remick, among others. Their engagement was announced by Buckingham Palace on 24 February 1981.

[NI4724] Aaron KITCHEL (photo) was born on 23 Apr 1842 in West Creek, Ind.. He moved in 1873. to Kansas from Iowa.
He lived there but a short time and returned to Warren County, Iowa. He moved in 1879.(14) to Colorado with his
family and took as a timber claim a good sized farm six miles east of Fort Collins near the Boxelder School which later
came under irrigation. Kitchel Lake on the place is named after him. He was successful as a farmer. Aaron sold the
place after his wife died and moved into Fort Collins in 1898. He served the County of Larimer as Commissioner for
three years and was always one of its foremost and highly respected citizens. While conveying the remains of his
mother from California to Iowa for burial at Palmyra Oct 25, 1910 , he took a severe cold which resulted in his death
two weeks later, at his home in Fort Collins. He died on 6 Nov 1910 in Fort Collins, Colorado. He served in the military
in Co. E. 23rd Regt., Iowa Infantry Volunteers. Aaron served from Aug. 12, 1862 to July 26, 1865. He was wounded
at Millikens Bend June 7, 1863. With his regiment he participated in the march from West Plains to Iron Mountain,
thence to New Madrid, MO., was at the siege of Vicksburg, battles of Port Gibson, Champion Hills, Black River Ridge,
the assault on Vicksburg, Millikens Bend, and the Siege of Mobile. After the fall of Vicksburg he was promoted to
corporal and served in the Atlantic compaign and Sherman's march to the sea. He was honorably discharged at
Galveston, Texas. He has record identification number 716. (3) He has Ancestral File number 6.

He was married to Mary HART (daughter of John P. HART) on 29 Sep 1868 in Palmyra, Iowa. Mary HART was born
in 1845 in Indiana. (3) She died on 6 Dec 1895 in Fort Collins, Colorado. She has record identification number 717.(3)
Aaron KITCHEL and Mary HART had the following children:

+24 i. Alfred Benson KITCHEL.
+25 ii. William Frank KITCHEL.
+26 iii. Oliver KITCHEL.
27 iv. Esther KITCHEL was born on 31 May 1876 in Iowa. She died on 25 Jun 1907 in Upland, California. She
has record identification number 1173. (3) She never marrie
28 v. Jennie KITCHEL was born on 6 Nov 1882 in Iowa. She died on 25 Dec 1937 in Ontario, California. She
was a School teacher in Ontario, California. She has record identification number 1174.(3) She graduated from
Denver Univ. and from Colorado Teachers' College at Greeley. She never married.

He was married to Mary HAMILTON on 25 Nov 1897. Mary HAMILTON was born in Dec 1846 in Pennsylania. She
died on 7 Sep 1908 in Fort Collins, Colorado.

[NI4726] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Ada Alice Connell was born in Brooklyn, IA, November 29,1901. Ada died February 16, 1991 at 89 years of age.

She married Silver James Cummins in Brooklyn, IA, September 21, 1924. Silver was born in Java, South Dakota, September 18, 1896. Silver was the son of Albert Cummins and Phoebie Fristoe. Silver died August 14, 1975 in Sebring, Florida, at 78 years of age. His body was interred in Pinecrest Cemetery, Serbing, Floridia. He was raised in Barnum, Minnesota, where he joined the Church of the Brethern. During WWI he served in the Army as a non-combatant in the medical service. He entered Bethany Bible School, finishing in 1925. they moved to Maywood, IL where he served as an ordained deacon in the First Church of the Brethern in Chicago. Later moved to Earlville, IL where they owned and managed a hotel until retirement. Hotel owners in Earlville, IL. Retired to Sebring, Floridia

[NI4729] Louis IX (St. Louis), King of France

Birth
25 APR 1214
Death
25 AUG 1270, Tunis, Africa
Burial
, St. Denis, France
Father
Louis VIII the Lion, King of France
Mother
Blanche of Castile

Family: Margaret of Provence

Marriage
1234

1.Philip III the Bold, King of France

NOTES: Louis, an outstanding monarch of medieval times, was canonized in 1297. His feast day is August 25.

[NI4737] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Benjamin never married.

[NI4784] The Protestant Reformation ignited by Martin Luther opened the door for many others to express their dissatisfaction with the Roman Catholic Church in Sixteenth Century Germany. The expression was not simply a verbal argument; the Protestant princes mustered armies among their followers, and responded to Catholic edicts with violence. The fact that Church lands were confiscated by force was distressing to the Catholic leaders. Charles V, King of Germany at the time of the Protestant Reformation, attempted to settle the religious quarel between the Protestants and Catholics by discussion and arbitration. When that effort failed, he resorted to force in the attempt to crush the Protestant armies. The Lutheran Princes joined in an alliance with the French king, Henry II, who was promised the border cities of Metz, Toul and Verdun if he supplied French aid to their cause. Charles realized what a war with France would entail, and offered a compromise.

The Peace of Augsburg in 1555 promised to the territorial princes the right to decide whether Catholicism or Lutheranism would be admitted within their respective realms. If the common man within a particular territory disagreed with the faith that the prince of that territory chose, he would be permitted to emigrate with his family to another territory. A second provision was that only Lutheranism, of the various Protestant sects, would be permitted in opposition to Catholicism. Lands which were in Lutheran possession at the time of the Treaty of Passau (1552) would remain under such ownership, but thereafter, if a Catholic bishop or other ecclesiastical leader were to convert to Lutheranism, he would have to forfeit his lands and property.

The Peace of Augsburg was flawed and, in part, served as a cause of the Thirty Years War that would erupt in 1618. It was difficult to enforce the provisions. On the one hand, the provision calling for the forfeiture of property was openly violated and flaunted. Catholic princes of territories throughout Germany professed a conversion to Lutheranism, but converted the Church properties within their realms into private holdings. On the other hand, the Peace of Augsburg recognized only Lutheranism as a valid Protestant sect. The Calvinists,
Anabaptists and others resented being excluded from the Peace of Augsburg's provisions. It was because of the latter problem that the Protestant Union was formed. The Union was led by a Calvinist prince by the name of Frederick, the Elector Palatine of the Rhine.

[NI4791] Notes for GERTRUDE MAUDE CONNELL:
Name Birth Death Last Residence Last Benefit SSN Issued Tools
GERTRUDE SIEMENS 18 Dec 1894 Jun 1975 98382 (Sequim, Clallam, WA) (none specified) 532-66-8158 Washington


More About GERTRUDE MAUDE CONNELL:
Occupation: Nurse

[NI4792] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Harold Benjamin Connell was born in/near Brooklyn, IA July 14, 1903. Harold died July 8, 1922 at 18 years of age. He was taken ill June 20 with acute appendicitis. Services were held at the Church of the Brethern. His body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. He became a member of the Church of the Brethern at age 13.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for HAROLD BENJAMIN CONNELL:
OBITUARY: HAROLD BENJAMIN CONNELL
Harold Benjamin Connell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Connell, was born August 14th, 1903 in their present home, and departed this life July 8th, 1922, age 18 years, ten months and twenty-four days. He was taken sick June 20th, with what proved the next day to be a very bad case of appendicitis, and he was taken immediately to the St. Francis hospital in Grinnell, where he underwent an operation. For the first ten days his recovery seemed to be very hopeful, bat at the end of this time, a painful disturbance began in the lower back part of his abdomen and this led to another operation on Thurday morning and his condition became very serious. For a time he seemed to hold his own, but as Friday evening came it became quite evident that he was losing fround rapidly, and all that human hands could do was done to no avail and he gradually grew weaker untiol 12:45 a.m. Saturday when he entered into his final rest. As soon as arrangements could be made the body was removed to his home four miles east of Brooklyn awaiting the funeral service which took place from the Church of the Brethren at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, and the body was laid to rest in the Brooklyn cemetery, Rev. J. Schechter officiating, of Ankeny, Iowa, and I. W. Brubaker, of Prairie City.

Harold was a wide awake, ambitious youth with high ideals and a large vision, balanced will and held steady by a strong Christian character. He became a Christian and united with the Church of the Brethren about seven years ago and was a member of the "Volunteers," and has cherished in his heart the hopes of pursuing such a course of preparation as to fit himself for a medical missionary, and be ready to enter that profession in some foreign field. He is also a member of the senior class of 1922 of the Brooklyn high school and is the first one to be called from their group be death. The class was present in a body at the funeral to share in the sorrows of our loss. His immediate relatives sirviving him are his parents; one brother, Glenn; two sisters, Mrs. Dr. Siemens, of Calgara, Al;berts, Canada; and Ina Connell, of Brooklyn and one grandparent, Mrs. Tamar Kysor. These with many distant relatives and friends reman to mourn his going. He is gone but not forgotten. He will ever live in the memory of his friends in whom there has been cast a contribution from his character. The many beautiful flowers and the presence of a vast crowd at the funeral is an index to the esteem in which the departed was held.

The following young men were selected from his companions and acted as pall bearers, Ross Connell, Ray Schechter, Cloid Lyman, Lester Breniman, Albert Uhl, and Everett Breneman.
Source: Brooklyn Chronicle, July 13, 1922

More About HAROLD BENJAMIN CONNELL:
Burial: Brooklyn Cemetery, Brooklyn, Poweshiek Co., Iowa

[NI4795] stephen Hitt
5024 132nd St Se
Evere
(425)337-9245

[NI4805] Submitted by Lori Hellmund, Clarinda Swadener's 3rd great granddaughter of Kettering, Ohio

Julia's headstone reads as follows:
Julia Ann
Daughter of S. and C.
Swadener
Aug. 12, 1856
Aged
4 Ys. 25 Ds.
"Ere sin could blight or sorrow faid
Death came with friendly care
The opening bud to heaven convaid
and bade it blossom there."

It's very hard to read on the stone; almost completely worn away.

[NI4809] Aaron Kent KITCHEL was born on 12 Jan 1949 in Sheridan, Wyoming. He served in the military from 1968 to
1972 in United States Navy. While in the service he was stationed on Midway Is., NAS Cubi Point in the Philippines
and on the aircraft carrier, USS Hancock. Was honorably discharge from the service as an Aviation Boatswain Mate 3rd Class. He was named after Aaron Kitchel (Great-grand father). He has record identification number 4098.(3)

Attended schools in Anaconda, Mont. and graduated from Anaconda Senior High in 1968. After getting out of the
military in 1972, he worked at a saw mill and then the Anaconda Copper Company at their copper smelting facility in Anaconda, Montana. Then he and Barbara moved to Gillette, Wyoming in 1977. Aaron worked for a security firm
which had security at the various open pit coal mines in the area and has work for Collins Communications, a
two-way radio company since 1978. Aaron has been on the board of directors of a water company since 1989,
serving in various positions.

He was married to Barbara Ann BLEILE (daughter of Adam Phillip BLEILE and Valeria BLASKOVICH) on 4 Mar 1975 in Anaconda, Montana. Barbara Ann BLEILE was born on 27 May 1958 in Butte, Montana. She has record
identification number - none assigned. Barbara attended schools in Anconda, Mont. Aaron Kent KITCHEL and
Barbara Ann BLEILE had the following children:

251 i. Adam Jared KITCHEL was born on 15 Jan 1992 in Gillette, Wyoming. He was named after Adam 'Tex'
Bleile (Grand father). He has record identification number - none assigned. When Adam was 6-1/2 years old he was
with his dad inspecting a riding mower, his dad mentioned that it had a Briggs & Stratton engine. And Adam replied
that it had a big strappen engine.
252 ii. Christina Marie KITCHEL was born on 17 Oct 1989 in Gillette, Wyoming. She has record identification
number - none assigned.

[NI4812] Copied by Jeanne Yoakam (Ohio) from a book, the History of Clark County page 694 and 697.

JOHN S. SWAIDNER, a representative farmer of Springfield township, who owns sixty-five
History of Clark County and representative citizens

Jacobs grandson

John S. Swaidner, a representative farmer of Springfield Township, who own 65 acres of valuable land situated on the Columbus Road, is part owner also of another farm of 280 acres which is situated in more field Township. Mr. Swaidner was born and Allen County, Indiana November 12th, 1856 and is a sound of John and Elizabeth (Raby) Swaidner, both whom are now deceased.

John S. Swaidner was reared in Allen County and remained on his bothers farm into the 17 years of age, when he attended the Township high school. When nineteen years old he began to teach, during the first year in the De Kalb County, and for six years more in Allen County, Indiana. Mr. Swaidner completed his education in Adrain college, Adrain, Michigan, and he was during his college life that he met the lady who subsequently became his wife, she being the student of college at the same time. They were married on March 23rd, 1882. Mrs. Swaidner was formerly Emma F. McKillip. She was a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth McKillip, people of substance and prominence in Moorefield Township. Mr. McKillip up died May 12, 1904, but his widow survives and these died in the old Homestead.

After marriage, Mr. and Mrs Swaidner took up their residence with Mr. and Mrs. McKillip,where they remained for ten years, Mr. Swaidner teaching school in Moorefield township for several years. In 1892 they settled on the present farm in Springfield Township, on which Mr. Swaidner carries on general farming. Mrs. Swaidner inherited the second farm from her father, and it is under rental. Mr. Swaidner fell heir to a third interest to 60 acres of his father's estate in Indiana in 1908. He and his wife have three children, namely: Daniel B., who died aged five months, Emma, Laura, and Jessie B.

Mr. Swaidner is a Republician in his political views. He was elected trustee of Moorefield Township and served on the Sprinfield township School Board for eleven years, during five of which he wa president of the board. While serving he performed a useful and important work, as it was through his persistent efforts that music and school libraries were installed in the township schools.


Newpaper article provided by Jeanne Yoakam:

John S. Swaidner Dies of Cancer of Stomach

John S. Swaidner, at the age of 58 years, died at his home on the Columbus road early Monday morning. Cancer of the stomach is believed to have caused his death. His sickness was prolonged for nearly a year.

Mr. Swaidner was born in Allen county but moved to the vicinity of Springfield in the year 1882, and remained there until his death. He was a member of the Methodist denomination.

He is survived by a widow, Mrs. Emma S. Swaidner; by two brothers, Alonzo and Nelson of Hicksville, a half sister, Mrs. Edith Cannan of Wapakoneta; a half brother, Arthur Swaidner of Pittsburg, Ohio, and by two daughters, Mrs Geroge E. Goodfellow, living on the Columbus road, and Jessie B. Swaidner, living with her mother.

The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence and burial will be made in Ferncliff cemetery.

[NI4813] Elizabeth Jane Swadner was born 4 May 1843 in Center twps, Clinton Co., Ind, USA. She died 3 Mar 1927 in , , Ind, USA. Her baptism was
submitted. Her endowment was submitted. Elizabeth married Peter Kohler on 25 Jun 1867 in Center twps, Clinton Co., Ind, USA. Their sealing was submitted.

[NI4826] Sbmitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Ina Mae Connell was born Warren Twp, Poweshiek County, IA January 10, 1899. Ina died August 4, 1979 in Poweshiek County, IA at 80 years of age. She died of cancer. Funeral services were at the Grace United Methodist Church, Brookly, IA, Her body was interred in Brookly Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA

She married Harvey Tesar Jones in Brethern parsonage, Brooklyn, IA Jan 31, 1924. Harvey was born in Madison Twp. Poweshiek County, IA. September 11, 1901. Harvey was the son of Harlan S. Jones and Mary Tesar. Harvey died March 10, 1996 in Home in Brooklyn, IA at 94 years of age. His body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. She attended college in Mt. Morris, IL for one year and Bethany Bible Seminary in Chicago. She taught school for several years. Harvey and Ina farmed for over 50 years east of Brookly, IA on od Highway 6. She was a member of the Church of the Brethern.

[NI4828] Elmer L. KITCHEL was born on 6 May 1870 in Liberty Center, Iowa. He died on 26 Mar 1949 in Arroyo
Grande, California. He has record identification number 1175. (3) Elmer farmed and operated a dairy at Visalia
and other points in California.

He was married to Minnie HUMMELL (daughter of T. C. HUMMELL and Florence HILL) on 20 Oct 1897 in
Bakersfield, California. Minnie HUMMELL was born on 5 May 1881 in Lemoore, Calif.. She died on 30 Mar
1959 in Arroyo Grande, California. She has record identification number 1176.(3) Elmer L. KITCHEL and Minnie
HUMMELL had the following children:

+92 i. Ralph Franklin KITCHEL.
93 ii. George C. KITCHEL was born on 22 Feb 1900 in Santa Maria, Calif.. He died on 13 May 1986 in
Arroyo Grande, California. He was a Custodian for local school district in Arroyo Grande, California. He has
record identification number 1819. (40) He has Ancestral File number 76. (4) He remained unmarried.
+94 iii. William Elmer KITCHEL.
+95 iv. Hattie Ramona KITCHEL.

[NI4843] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Glen Alton Connell was born in Carnforth, IA, August 30, 1891. Glen died May 8, 1975 in Poseshiek, IA, at 83 years of age. Funeral services were held at the United Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, IA. His body was interred in Brookly Mmeorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA

He married twice. He married Verna Pearl Brannian October 1913. Verna died January 1929. Her body is interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. He married Lona Margaret Duffus in Little Brown Church in Val, Nashua, IA, June 28, 1930. Lona was born in Madison Twp. Poweshiek County, IA Oct 12, 1909. Lona was thje daughter of A.L. "Rene" Duffus and M. Ethel Carmichael. Lona died December 8, 1994 at Brookhaven Nursing Home, Brooklyn, IA, at 85 years of age. She died from complications of cancer.

Her body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brookly, IA. Moved with his parents to the Connell farm in Section 20 of Warren Township in the fall of 1894. Attended Warrren # 9 and graduated BHS in 1910. He taught contry school. Rural mail carrier for 31 years. He retired in 1957. Belonged to the Church of the Brethern.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for GLENN ALTON CONNELL:
Source on this family from Obit of Lona M. Connell and Glenn Connell.

GLENN CONNELL SERVICES HELD
Funeral services for Glenn Connell, 83, of 707 Broadway, Brooklyn, were held at 10:30 a.m., Monday in the United Presbyterian Church. Mr. Connell died Thursday night in his home.

Rev. Earl Cater, pastor of the Church of the Brethren, officiated. The organist was Mrs. Beverly Vaverks. Flowers attended by Mr. and Mrs. _______________ and Mrs. _______ Manatt. Honorary casket bearers were George Dale, Nelson Korns, Ray Robey, G.W. Manatt, Henry Manatt, and Walter Stoker. Casket-bearers were Leo Rhinehart, Clarence Rhinehart, Bruno Van Eravelde, Henry DeMeulenaere, Don Ent, and Lyman Case. Interment was in the IOOF Cemetery. The Nevenhoven Funerasl Home was in charge of arrangements.

GLEN ALTON CONNELL
Glenn Alton Connell, son of Lloyd and Rose Keysor Connell, was born in Carnforth, Iowa, on August 30th, 1891. He moved with his parents to the Connell farm in Section 20 of Warren Township in the fall of 1894. He attended Warren #9 School and graduated from Brooklyn High Scool in 1910.

Mr. Connell taught country school for a few years and farmed also. He was united in marriae in October of 1913 to Verna Pearl Erannian. To this union four children were born, Rollin, Pauline, John and Warren. She died in January, 1929.
On June 28, 1930 he was united in marriage ot Lona Margaret Duffus. To this union one child, Harold, was born.
Mr. Connell was a rural letter carrier from Brooklyn for almost 31 years. He retired in 1957. He was a clerk at Miles and Warfela Clothing Store.

Mr. Connell was a member of the Church of the Brethren and was a deacon; a member of the Rural Mail Carriers Ass'n; and a 50 year member of the Farm Bureau.

Surviving Mr. Connell are his wife, Lona, three sons, Rillin of Hudson, Iowa. Warren of Englewood, Colorado, and Harold of Pauline, Mrs. Rex Rohrer of Fairfax, Iowa; 2 sisters, Gertrude, Mrs. W. J. Siemens of Sequin, Wash., and Ina, Mrs. Harvey Jones of Brooklyn; 9 grandchildren; and 8 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife, Verna; 1 son, John; 1 brother, Harold; and 1 grandchild.

More About GLENN ALTON CONNELL:
Burial: Brooklyn, Powesheik Co., Iowa
Occupation: Farmer/Mail Carrier

[NI4845] Copied from Ohio Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death
Document privided to author by Jeanne Yoakam

Reg. Dist. No.06
Primary Reg. Dist. No.0601
State File No.070670
Registrar's No.235

1.Decendent-NameArthur G. Swaidner
2.Sex:Male
3.Date of Death:October 26, 1978
4.Race:White
5.(a)Age-Last Birthday:98
6.Date of Birth:October 3, 1880
7.(a)County of Death:Auglaize
(b)City, Village, or Location of Death:St. Mary, Ohio
(c)Hospital or other Institution:Jnt. Twp Memorial Hospital
(d)If Hospital or Institution:DOA
8.(a)State of Birth:Indiana
(b)Citizen of What Country:USA
9.Orgin or Descent:?
10.Social Security Number:207-09-6623
11.Was Deceased ever in U.S. Armed Forces:No
12.(a)Married, Never Married, Widowed, Divorced:Blank
(b)Surviving Spouse:Blank
13.(a)Usual Occupation:Pharmacist (retired 1953)
(b)Kind of Business or Industry:Blank
14.(a)Residence - State:Ohio
(b)County:Auglaize
(c)City, Village, or Location:Wapakoneta
(d)Street and Number:314 Cole Drive
15.Father - Name:John Swaidner
16.Mother - Name:Anna Fiel
17.(a)Informat - Name:Arthur W. Swaidner
(b)Mailing address:See #14 abcde
Part 1.Death Was Caused By:
18.(a)Artersois Lclerotic Heart DeseaseApproximate Interval Between Onset and Death:10 years
(b)
19.(a)Autopsy:No
(b)Was Case Referred to Coroner:No
20.(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
21.(a)To the best of my knowledge, death occurred at the time, date, and place and due to the cause stated.
Signature and title:Robert J. Herman, MD
(b)Date signed:October 30, 1978
(c)Hour of Death:5:50 AM October 26, 1978
22.(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
23.Name and Address of Certifiy Physician or Coroner:Robert J. Herman, MD
1007 West Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
24.(a)Burial, Cremation:Burial
(b)Date:November 1, 1978
(c)Name of Cemetery or Crematory:Memorial Park Garden Mausoleum
(d)Location:St. Petersburg, Florida
25.Name of Embalmer:Charles E. Robinson IILic. No. 7163A
26.Funeral Director's Signature:C.D. SiferdLic. No. 4408
27.Funeral Firm and Address:Charles D. Siferd Funeral Home, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
28.Date rec'd by Local Reg.November 1, 1978
29.Registrar's Signature:Evelyn George
30.Date Permit Issued:Blank
31.Signature of Person Issuing Permit:Blank

[NI4855] Maria Margaret Swaidner born 1842 Ohio. Died 1922. Buried North Georgetown Cemetery, Columbiana Co. OH Row 10 She married S. Zelotus Whiteleather in Columbiana Co. OH Dec. 14, 1867. He was born Aug. 4, 1842 Columbiana Co. OH, the son of Johan George Whiteleather and Elizabeth Zimmerman. He died Dec. 13, 1881 Knox Twp. Columbiana Co. OH . Buried North Georgetown Cemetery, Columbiana Co. OH 10th row. He served in Co. D. 115th OH Volunteers. Maria remarried to a Galbreath.

[NI4877] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Ross Jacob Connell was born in Brooklyn, IA March 4, 1904. Ross died March 26, 1990 Brookhaven Nursing Home, Brooklyn, IA at 86 years of age. His body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA.

He married twice. He married Gloria Blanche McLeod in Maywood, IL September 14, 1927. Gloria was born February 8, 1909. Gloria died March 2, 1986 at 77 years of age. He married Virginia Evelyn Rohrer Smith in Brooklyn, IA, January 9, 1966. Virginia wa born in South of Victor, IA, April 24, 1907. Virginia was the daughter of Charles Rohrer and Edna Gwin. She married Boyd Smith of Marengo, IA, April 10, 1928. Virginia died December 1, 1992 in Grinnell, IA, at 85 years of age. Her body was interred in Victor Memorial Cemetery, Victor, IA. Ross was a 1922 graduate of Brooklyn High School. He attended Bethany Bible College in Chicago, IL After college he made his home in Franklin Park, IL. Ross was proprietor of a gas station in Franklin Park, IL. He retired in 1996 and made their home in Victor, IA. where he continued to be employed as a part-time carpenter. He moved in March 1989 to Brookhaven Nursing Home when his health failed. One incident in his life: In the early 1920's he found Bill Snyder rural Brooklyn, dead. It was later found that his neighbor, a Patten, poisoned him.

[NI4902] Hattie Nevernna KITCHEL (41) was born on 26 Aug 1873 in Palmyra, Iowa. She died on 19 Apr 1957 in
Portersville, California. She has record identification number 1178.(3) Her and Ray lived for many years in Bellvue,
Wash. where they engaged in gardening and operated a green house. They had no children.

She was married to Ray CALLOWAY on 21 Jun 1900 in Fort Collins, Colorado. Ray CALLOWAY was born in 1876 in
Livermore, Colo.. He died on 25 Mar 1938 in Washington.

[NI4904] Charles Wesley KITCHEL (42) was born on 26 Sep 1875 in Fort Collins, Colorado. He died in Oct 1972 in
Portersville, California. (25) He has record identification number 1180. (3) He was a farmer and dairyman for many
years and retired from that occupation. He and Edith's 65th wedding anniversary was celebrated on May 19, 1962
and was attended by a large gatering of their children, grandchildren, relatives and friends.

He was married to Edith Fern HILL (daughter of Charles H HILL and Ellen J. RHODES) on 19 May 1897 in
Bakersfield, California. Edith Fern HILL was born on 2 Feb 1880 in Lemoore, Calif.. She has record identification
number 1181. (3) Charles Wesley KITCHEL and Edith Fern HILL had the following children:

96 i. Hattie R. KITCHEL was born on 13 Dec 1897 in Creston, Calif.. She died on 4 Apr 1899 in Creston, Calif..
She has record identification number 1822. (3)
+97 ii. Edward Charles KITCHEL.
+98 iii. Grace H. KITCHEL.
+99 iv. Robert Curtiss KITCHEL.
+100 v. Harold H. KITCHEL.
+101 vi. Josephine M. KITCHEL.
+102 vii. Edith Mildred KITCHEL.
+103 viii. James Elmer KITCHEL.

[NI4909] NOTES: Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn.

[NI4910] NOTES: a.k.a.: Leopold, Duke of Albany; Leopold George Duncan Albert, Duke of Albany.

[NI4916] Served in U.S. Navy as enlisted in early 1950's.

[NI4920] Served in the U.S. Navy. Retired in the early 1970's, 30 years of service, retiring as Master Chief Dental Technician.
No children.

[NI4927] Submitted by Lucy Funk in an e-mail to Jeanne Yoakam

Nelson Scholes was born in Belmont County, Ohio, November 15, 1819, a son of John and Mary (McGee) Scholes, natives of Maryland, and early settlers of Ohio. When he was four years old his parents moved to Richland County, where he was reared, and lived till his removal to De Kalb County. When he was sixteen years old his father died, and he remained with his mother till his marriage. In November, 1852, he moved to De Kalb County, bought his present farm of 150 acres on sections 14 and 23, Concord Township. A part of it was formerly the Widney farm, and partiually improved. He has been successful in his pursuits, and now has his land under cultivation, and his buildings are among the best in the county. He was married in 1847 to Lydia, daughter of Peter and Sarah (Butlinger) Wiltison. They had three children, but one whom is living - John, now of Dallas County, Iowa. His wife (Lydia) died April 18, 1851.

September 5, 1852, he married Mary Swaidner, daughter of JACOB and BARBARA (Goodbaker) Swaidner. To whom have been born six children, Emma J., wife of Charles Abel, of Muskegon County, Michigan, Franklin of Allen County, Forence, wife of Charles Justison: Joseph, Ida, and Elida. The latter died aged five years. Mr. and Mrs. Scholes are members of the Disciples Church. In politics he is a Democrat.

Copied from page 543 of the 1885 De Kalb County History.


Biography of Nelson Scholes
page 543, History of DeKalb County, Indiana
Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, 1885

Nelson Scholes was born in Belmont County, Ohio Nov 15,1819, a son of John and Mary (McGee) Scholes, natives of Maryland, and early settlers of Ohio.

When he was four years old his parents moved to Richland County, where he was reared, and lived till his removal to DeKalb County. When he was sixteen years old his father died, and he remained with his mother till his marriage. In November, 1852 he moved to DeKalb County and bought his present farm of 150 acres in sections 14 and 23 Concord Township. A part of it was formerly the Widney Farm, and partially improved. He has been successful in his pursuits, and now has his land under cultivation, and his buildings are among the best in the county. He was married 1847 to Lydia Wiltison daughter of Peter and Sarah (Butlinger) Wiltison. They had three children but one of whom is living......John, now of Dallas County, Iowa. His wife died April 18, 1851. Sept 5, 1852 he married Mary Swaidner, daughter of Jacob and barbara (Goodbaker) Swaidner. To them have been born six children...Emma J., wife of Charles Able, of Muskegon County, Michigan; Franklin of Allen County; Florence, wife of Charles Jutison, Joseph , Ida and Elida. The latter died age of five years. Mr and Mrs Scholes are members of the Disciples Church. In Politics he is a Democrat.

Submitted by: Arlene Goodwin
Auburn Indiana
Agoodwin@ctlnet.comm

[NI4928] Richland County Cemetery Records, Richland county Chapter of OGS,
p104 - Interments in Bellville Cemetery, Jefferson Twp
SWADNER, Mrs. Lilllie born Richland County, resident of New Castle PA, 3 Oct
1865-28 Aug 1900
(two more after 1960 - did not copy)

p141. Baldwin Middlebury Cemetery, Knox County (!) Middlebury Twp, on the
south side of County Line Road (Leedy Rd) (This is filed under Jefferson
Twp, so assume that it is on the county line. cks)
SWADENER
John, d Jun 23, 1862, age 78-8-25
Rachel, w/o John, Jan 8, 1879, age 84-1-19
Adana Annette d/o J.F. and M. d 3 Mar 1863, age 4 yr, 21 days
J.F. 1829-1902 (Could this be your Joseph?)
Maria BEAN, w/o J.F. 1827-1908
John B. 1865-1947
C. Belle w/o John 1878----

[NI4929]
The Creager history

Compiled by
Irene Creager Lawson

Edited
George Edward Creager

Austin, Texas
January 1, 1985


Mary Jane's parents, Henry and Eleanor [Suman] Swadener, or both born in Frederick County, Maryland, he, Nov. 26, 1791, and she July 11th, 1798. They had nine children which Mary Jane was their first born. There are other children's names and birth dates [taken from the Swadener family Bible] were: Daniel -- 22 July, 1820; Samuel -- Oct. 23rd, 1823; Sarah and -- Sept. 4, 1823; Elizabeth -- February 21, 1825; Clarinda -- June 7, 1827; Levina -- June 23, 1835. In Mary Jane's father, Henry, died Dec. 31860 and her mother, Eleanor, September 18, 1868 both in Montgomery County, Ohio. Henry Swadener's estate packet No. 3205 can be found in the probate court of Montgomery County, Ohio. It was probated January 3rd, 1861 by Henry Routzong, Uriah Shank and Samuel Swadener. The widow took the family Bible, one bureau, one bedstead and one bidding and $200. No tears were listed. [The old Swadener family Bible is in the possession of Della Caden, who lives in Florida. Information from the Bible was furnished by a Leona Keplinger Unger of the West Alexandria, Ohio.] Eleanor's parents, Mary Jane's paternal grandparents, or Jacob and Mary Suman. They were buried in Creager Cemetery [markers now in David's Cemetery]. Jacob Suman was born Feb. 7, 1826 and died 1877 and Mary Suman was born in 1826. Emanuel L. and Mary Jane Creager, along with several dissuade her family, became members of the David's reform church on May 19th, 1844.

The 1840 census this list Emanuel and Mary Jane living in Washington Township, Montgomery County with two children. Emanuel L. and Mary Jane then purchased 81 acres of land and Darke County, Adams Township. The "Atlas of Darke County -- 1857" shows E. Creager's farm just north of New Harrison, Ohio, between Greenville and Bradford. Other Creager's living in that area at the time or his brother Michael and two cousins, Thomas Creager and Solomon Creager. The 1850 census list Emanuel and Mary Jane and seven children living on their Darke County farm. By the 1860 census, it was them with 11 children from 22 to 2 years of age on their Darke County farm in Adams Township.

Emanuel and Mary Jane left Darke County in the late 1860s after the death of their two teenage children. They were reinstated in David's church May 15, 1867 they were dismissed by letter to Slifers Reformed [now Presbyterian] with church near Farmersville, Ohio, along with their two daughters, Elizabethan Rosetta. They were members until Mary Jane's death in 1876. After Mary Jane's death, Emanuel broke up his home and went to live with his children. In the 1870 census, he was living in Montgomery County, Miami Township. In the Preble County directory of 1875, West Alexandria, or the names listed of the Emanuel Creager and his son Charles Creager. In the 1880 census, Emanuel and a son Wesley, and a daughter Elizabeth, or living with their son Charles and his wife, Hannah, and two daughters, Della and Bertha, at their home one-quarter mile north of West Alexandria. Charles died on February 16, 1888 and his public sale was March 13, 1888. Emanuel then went to live in Liberty, Ohio, hurried died on Jan. 14, 1891. Emanuel, Mary Jane and their two teenage children are buried under a huge tree in David's Cemetery alongside Mary Jane's parents, Henry and Eleanor Swadener.

[NI4930] Centennial Portrait and Biographical Record of the City of Dayton and of Montgomery County, Ohio
Pages 1308-1310 John P. Creager to John Zehring

SAMUEL SWADENER, [page 1309] one of the successful farmers of Montgomery county, Ohio, was born in Van Buren township, this county, October 23, 1821, his farm lying in section 4, of the township. He is a son of Henry and Ellen (Suman) Swadener, the former of whom was a native of Maryland. Henry and Ellen Swadener were the parents of nine children, three sons and six daughters, six of whom are still living, as follows: Daniel; Samuel; Sarah, widow of Joseph Brown; Henry; Clarinda, wife of Henry Roussong; and Lavina, wife of Riley Shank.

Henry Swadener was a mechanic, and while yet a young man located in Montgomery county in its early pioneer days, and bought a small farm in Van Buren township. Here he died in 1858, at sixty-nine years of age. His father died in Maryland, The maternal grandfather of Samuel Swadener, Mr. Suman, located in Van Buren township as one of the earliest of the pioneers, and lived here all his life.

Samuel Swadener lived with his parents in Van Buren township until he was twenty-two years of age. He was married, February 11, 1847, to Miss Caroline Roussong, daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Flook) Roussong. To this marriage there have been born seven children, three sons and four daughters, five of whom are now living, as follows: Michael J., Frances G., Ida Belle, Margaret A., and Samuel C. Those that died were named William H. and Julia A. Michael J. married Miss Joanna Miller, by whom he has one child living, Royal. Frances G. married William Cress; they have two children, Clarence E. and Edna May. Ida Belle married Perry Saylor; they also have two children, Goldie May and Samuel Roscoe. Margaret A. married Joseph Saylor, and they have two children Otho and Clifford. Samuel C. married Miss Elnora Michaels, and they have one child, Harry LeRoy.

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Swadener are members of the German Reformed church, and in politics Mr. Swadener is a democrat. He is a most industrious and prosperous man, owning a farm of 100 acres, which is well improved. He has lived in Van Buren township during his entire life, a period of seventy-five years. His wife’s people came to Montgomery county from Maryland in the early pioneer days, and settled in Van Buren township, where they have always been held in high esteem. They have contributed largely to the growth and prosperity of the county, and have done well their part in life. Too much cannot be said in honor of the pioneer settlers of Ohio, who laid well the foundations of the commonwealth, which now deservedly claims so proud a place in the long list of great states of the Union.



Copied from Montgomery County History, Biographical Sketches: page 454.

SAMUEL SWADENER, farmer, P. O. Dayton, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, October 23, 1822, a son of Henry and Ellen Swadener, who emigrated from Maryland and settled in Montgomery County at an early date. They were the parents of nine children----Mary Jane, Daniel, Samuel, Sarah, Elizabeth, Clarinda, Lavina, Charlotte, and Henry. The parents, with the oldest and youngest daughters, are deceased. Samuel, the subject of this sketch, was reared to farm life, and has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He owns 100 acres of land in Van Buren Township, Montgomery County, which is well improved and under good cultivation. He was united in marriage, February 11, 1847, with Caroline Routsong, a native of this county, born January 16, 1826. Seven children are the fruits of this union----Michael J., Francis G., Julia A. (deceased), William H., Ida Belle, Maggie, and Samuel C. The two oldest are married and reside in Miami Township. Mr. Swadener and family, except two children, are members of the Reformed Chruch.


Descendants of Richard Templin

126. SAMUEL5 SWADENER (ELEANOR "ELLEN"4 SUMAN, MARY "POLLY"3 TEMPLIN, SAMUEL2, RICHARD1) was born October 23, 1822 in Montgomery Co., Ohio, and died April 5, 1903 in Montgomery Co., Ohio. He married CAROLINE ROUTSONG February 11, 1847 in Montgomery Co., Ohio.

Children of SAMUEL SWADENER and CAROLINE ROUTSONG ar
i.
MICHAEL J. SWADENER.
ii.
FRANCIS G. SWADENER.
iii.
JULIA A. SWADENER, b. July 9, 1852, Montgomery Co.,
Ohio; d. August 2, 1856, Montgomery Co., Ohio.
iv.
WILLIAM H. "WILLIE" SWADENER, b. December 27, 1855,
Montgomery Co., Ohio; d. November 29, 1890,
Montgomery Co., Ohio.
v.
IDA BELLE SWADENER.
vi.
MAGGIE SWADENER.
vii.
SAMUEL C. SWADENER.

Centennial Portrait and Biographical Record of the City of Dayton and of Montgomery County, Ohio, page 1309, Samuel Swadener, one of the successfulfarmers of Montgomery county, Ohio, was born in Van Buren township. He is a son of Henry and Ellen (Suman) Swadener, the former of whom was a native of Maryland.

Samuel Swadener lived with his parents in Van Burne township until he was twenty-two years of age. He married, February 11, 1847 to Miss Caroline Roussong, daughter of Hacob and Catherine (Flook) Roussong. To this marriage there have been born seven children, three sons and four daughters, five of whom are now living, as follows: Michael J., Francis G., Ida Belle,. Margaret A., and Samuel C. Those that died were named William H. and Julia A. Michael J. married Miss Joanna, Miller, by whom he has one child living, Royal. Francius G. married William Cress; they have two children, Clarence E. and Edna May. Ida Belle married Perry Saylor, the also have two children, Goldie May and Samuel Roscoe. Margaret A. married Joseph Saylor and they have two children, Othro and Clfford. Samuel C. married Miss Elnora Michaels, and they have one child, Harry LeRoy.

Mr. and Mrs Samuel Swadener are members of the German Reformed Church, and in politics Mr. Swadener is a democrat. He is a most industrious and prosperous man, owning a farm of 100 acres, which is well improved. He has lived in Van Buren township during his entire life, a period of seventy-five years. His wife's people came to Montgomery County from Maryland in the early pioneer days. and settled in Van Buren twonship, whidh they have always been held in high esteem. They contributed largely to the growth and prosperity of the county, and have done well their part in life. Too much cannot be said in honor of the pioneer settlers of Ohio, who laid well fondations of the commonwealth, which now deservedly claims so proud a place in the long list of great states of the Union.

[NI4985] NOTES: Helena, Princess Christian of Schleswig-Holstein; Known as "Lenchen" to the family.

[NI4999] Ansgarde


Born: ?
Died: ?

Father: ?
Mother: ?

Married (1): Louis II, the Stammerer, Western Frankish King
Children:
Louis III, Western Frankish King
Carloman, Western Frankish King

Ansgarde was the wife of the French king Louis II and mother of the French kings Louis III and Carloman
(joint).

[NI5001] Edward II, King of England

Birth
25 APR 1284, Caernarvon, Castle, Wales
Death
21 SEP 1327, Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire
Burial
, Gloucester, Cathedral
Father
Edward I (Longshanks), King of England
Mother
Eleanor of Castile

Family: Isabella of France

Marriage
25 JAN 1308, Boulogne

1.Edward III, King of England
2.John of Eltham, Earl of Cornwall
3.Eleanor
4.Joan of the Tower

NOTES: Edward was the first heir apparent in English history to be proclaimed, Prince of Wales. He was a
Plantagenet King of England (the House of Anjou) whose incompetence and distaste for government finally
led to his deposition and murder. In January 1327, Parliament forced Edward to resign and proclaimed the
Prince of Wales king as Edward III. On September 21 of that year Edward II was murdered by his captors at
Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire.

Ruled from 1307- 1327

[NI5002] NOTES: Reign: 1610-43; During his minority from 1610 to 1617 his mother served as regent. She allied France
with Spain and arranged the marriage in 1615 of Louis to Princess Anne of Austria, dau. of Philip III, King of
Spain. For most of his reign Louis was dominated by Cardinal Richelieu, who joined his council of ministers in
1624 through the efforts of Maried de Medicis and served eventually as prince minister until his death in 1642.
Louis's reign was marked by occasional religious strife between Roman Catholics and the French Protestants
or Huguenots, and the many conspiracies against Richelieu. Louis was succeeded by his son Louis XIV.

[NI5042] Mary Bell CRAIG was born on 26 Jul 1902 in Warren County, Iowa. She has Ancestral File number
52.(4) She has record identification number 3850.(3) Graduated at Simpson College, taught school several
years, owns farms near Hartford. Never married, and retired by devoting her life to helping her brother (67)
Charles K. take care of his invalid wife.

[NI5054] NOTES: Frederick V, Elector Palatine of the Rhine, King of Bohemia 1619-20 (the Winter King) had issue, of whom the youngest daughter, Sophia, became the mother of King George I. Of the Luxemburg Dynasty.

The ambitions of Emperor Matthias, the Habsburg king of Austria posed a threat to both, the Protestants and the Catholics. But the Catholic princes formed a League, led by Maximilian of Bavaria, to counter the Protestant Union. The Catholic League decided to support the Habsburg king, who professed his devout Catholic faith. Matthias was childless, and his choice for successor was Ferdinand of Styria, who was likewise loyal to Catholicism. The choice of Ferdinand was accepted in Austria and most of the other regions that fell under the direct control of the Habsburg king. But in Bohemia, the predominantly Calvinist noblemen staged a protest against another Catholic king over their territories. They declared the dethronement of the Habsburg dynasty and then proclaimed the election of Frederick, the Elector Palatine of the Rhine as their new king.

King Ferdinand responded to the Bohemian challenge by enlisting the aid of a Spanish army to invade the Palatinate region of Germany, and with Maximilian of Bavaria to invade Bohemia with his own army. The Catholic forces were victorious in this initial foray. From that point the war escalated into an international conflict. The Spanish king, Philip IV saw his success in destroying the Palatinate as simply a stepping stone to retaking possession of Holland. The invasion of Holland by the Spanish brought England and France into the conflict on the behalf of Holland. The war even spread across the Atlantic Ocean to Brazil in South America. King Christian IV of Denmark and Norway, the Duke of Holstein, and as such a member of the Holy Roman Empire, invaded Germany in an effort to overthrow the Habsburg dynasty. The predominantly Lutheran nation of Sweden joined in the war as an ally of the Protestant Union, it is said, because she feared in Germany fell to the Papists, Sweden would be next.

The Thirty Years War was finally brought to a conclusion with the Treaty of Westphalia, which was signed on 24 October, 1648. The terms of the treaty included the extension of the same rights to the Calvinists as those that had been extended to the Lutherans in the Peace of Augsburg. The Upper Palatinate was ceded to Bavaria. The Lower Palatinate was restored to the eldest son of Frederick, the Elector of the Palatinate of the Rhine. Western Pomerania, including Bremen and Verden, was ceded to Sweden. Brandenburg received the bishoprics of Camin, Halberstadt, Minden and a large portion of Magdeburg. France obtained the Alsace, with the exception of Strasburg; she also retained possessionof Metz, Toul and Verdun. The United Provinces of the Netherlands (i.e. Holland) and Switzerland received their independence from the Empire.

The results of the Thirty Years War, in spite of the devastation wrought on Germany included a certain amount of religious freedom and the emergence of "modern" statehood in Europe. In the end, not all of the Protestant sects were granted equal liberty; only Lutheranism and Calvinism were afforded legal status alongside Catholicism. But since it was the Calvinists who instigated the conflict, they were satisfied with the settlement. Of importance to the Protestant Union was the curtailment of the Habsburg dominance in Germany. The prestige of the Holy Roman Empire was shattered as a result of the war, and as a result, it emerged as simply one of the many "sovereign states" of Europe.

From the History Channel

Frederick the Winter King, 1596-1632, king of Bohemia (1619-20, or during one winter; hence his sobriquet) and elector palatine (1610-20) as Frederick V. The Protestant diet of Bohemia deposed the Catholic King Ferdinand (Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand Ii) and named Frederick king, thus precipitating the Thirty Years War. When he did not receive the expected Protestant support, he was defeated (1620) at White Mountain and forced to give up all his lands. He was the father of Prince Rupert and of the Electress Sophia, the forebear of the British ruling family the Hanovers.

[NI5062] Ruled from 1625 to 1649.

[NI5099] NOTES: Christened: Victoria Mary Augusta Louis Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; Known as: Princess May; After 1910, Queen Mary (The ocean line, The Queen Mary was named after her). Queen Mary was a shy woman, whose only broadcast contact with the people of Britain or her Empire consisted of the twenty-eight words with which she christened the massive Cunard line that bore her name. But she set a social example even more formidable than that of her husband, and she molded her own family, including her grandchildren, in a most definite fashion. Known as: Mary (1867-1953); Princess May of Teck (1867-1893); Duchess of York (1893-1901); Princess of Wales (1901-1910); Queen Mary (1910-1936); Queen Mother (1936-1953)

[NI5102] Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II as enlisted in the Pacific Theater - a Destroyer Sailor.

[NI5114] Elizabeth I, Queen of England from 1558 to 1603, is famous for the glamour of her court, the success of her policies, and her
long-preserved virginity. She was born on 7th September 1533, the daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn. Henry,
who had just had his marriage to Catherine of Aragon annulled and married Anne in the hope of begetting a male heir, was initially
disappointed at Elizabeth's birth. He soon convinced himself, however, that Anne would eventually produce a son. When she failed to do
so and when suspicion of infidelity was cast upon her, she was executed in 1536. Elizabeth thus grew up without a mother's care,
although Henry’s last wife, Catherine Parr, was for a time an affectionate stepmother.

Her reign began on 17th November 1558 when Mary died. Elizabeth immediately named Sir William Cecil (later Lord Burghley) her chief
minister, and with his help she concluded the famous Elizabethan Settlement for the Church of England. Religion in England had been
unsettled since Henry VIII's break with the pope in 1533. Moderate Protestantism had been practised under Henry, and more radical
Protestant programs were implemented under Edward VI; but Mary had restored the Roman Catholic faith and papal jurisdiction to
England. Elizabeth herself was a moderate Protestant. Foreign affairs, always linked with religion, presented an ongoing threat to
Elizabeth's security. The great fear was that an alliance of Catholic powers might force her from the throne and reintroduce a Catholic
monarch. In the end no such Catholic league was formed, but Elizabeth did send English forces to fight on the Protestant side in two
European conflicts, the Wars of Religion in France and the revolt of the Dutch against Spanish rule.

The position of Mary, Queen of Scots threatened Elizabeth's safety as well. Mary was the granddaughter of Henry VIII's sister Margaret
Tudor by King James IV of Scotland. After the death of her first husband, Francis II of France, Mary returned to Scotland, but her
subjects rebelled against her, and in 1568 she fled to England. Since she was a Roman Catholic she immediately became the focus for a
number of Catholic conspiracies; these included the Northern Rebellion (1569),the Ridolfi Plot (1571), the Throckmorton Plot (1583),
and the Babington Conspiracy (1586). For many years, Elizabeth worried by the idea of creating a precedent if she ordered the
execution of another monarch and how this would reflect on her, resisted demands that Mary be condemned to death. She eventually
signed her death warrant in 1587.

Although Elizabeth never married, she had many suitors. She was greatly attracted to Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, and might have
wed him had he not been suspected (probably incorrectly) of murdering his wife, Amy Robsart. Elizabeth rejected an offer of marriage
from the Spanish king, Philip II, but she did allow lengthy courtships by two members of the French royal family--the duc d'Anjou, who
became King Henry III, and his brother Francois, duc d'Alencon. Since Elizabeth had no children and there were no other descendants
of Henry VIII, the Tudor line was extinguished upon her death. Throughout her reign Elizabeth refused to designate a successor, but it is
clear that she expected King James VI of Scotland to follow her. When Elizabeth died on 24th March 1603, James, the son of Mary,
Queen of Scots, but a Protestant, succeeded without incident as James I of England.

[NI5121] Ralph Franklin KITCHEL was born on 29 Aug 1898 in Creston, Calif.. He died on 24 Oct 1993. (25) He
has record identification number 1818. (3) He is employed in a feed store

He was married to Nellie Bernice CLOUSER (daughter of Frank CLOUSER and Clara ATCHISON) on 9 Apr 1927.
Nellie Bernice CLOUSER was born on 8 Mar 1906 in Grayrocks, Wyoming. She has record identification
number 1844.(3) Ralph Franklin KITCHEL and Nellie Bernice CLOUSER had the following children:

+183 i. Frances Bernice KITCHEL.

[NI5170] Notes for PAULINE ELNORA CONNELL:
POWESHIEK CO. BIRTH RECORDS
Vol. 4, p194
Pauline Elnora Connell, b July 22, 1917

[NI5174] Notes for ROBERTA MAE HALL JONES:
She was adopted in the fall of 1939.

More About ROBERTA MAE HALL JONES:
Adoption: 1939, Adopted

[NI5175] Notes for ROLLIN LAVON CONNELL:
They lived on a farm near Hudson, Iowa.

[NI5191] Childeric I, King of the Salian Franks
Born: c437
Died: 481

Father: Merovech, King of the Salian Franks
Mother: ?

Married (1): Basina
Children:
Clovis I, King of the Franks
Audofleda
Lanthechild

King of the Salian Franks 456-481

Childeric succeeded his semi-legendary father Merovech as king of the Salian Franks of northern Gaul in 456, during Roman times. He became infatuated with the daughters of his subjects, who were so incensed about this that they forced him to give up the throne. He discovered that they intended to assassinate him, and he fled to Thuringia, leaving a close friend and telling him to send him a message when Childeric could return to his kingdom.

Childeric took refuge with Bisinus, King of the Thuringian Franks, and his wife Basina. The king elected by the Franks was cruel, and soon after Childeric was re-called to his kingdom by his friend, and was restored to the throne. Once Bisinus and Childeric were both kings, Basina deserted her husband and went to live with Childeric, who married her and had a son Clovis.

After a battle with Odoacer, King of the Saxons (and conquerer of the Western Roman Empire, 476), at Orleans, Childeric and the Saxon king made a peace treaty and together subdued the Alamanni, who had invaded a part of Italy. In 481 Childeric died and was succeeded by Clovis, his son by Basina.

[NI5204] Prince William is the elder son of The Prince of Wales and Diana, Princess of Wales.

He was born at 9.03pm on 21st June 1982, at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, London. A bulletin announced that the Royal baby weighed 7lb 1 1/2oz.

On 4th August 1982, Prince William Arthur Philip Louis was christened by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Robert Runcie, in the Music Room at Buckingham Palace.

After attending Mrs Mynors School, Prince William became a pupil at Wetherby School in London, from 15th January 1987 until 5th July 1990.

From September 1990, The Prince attended Ludgrove School in Berkshire, for five years until 5th July 1995. He then attended Eton College from July 1995 and studied Geography, Biology and History of Art at A Level.

After a gap year in which he visited Chile, Belize, worked on British dairy farms and visited countries in Africa, Prince William chose to study at St Andrews University in Fife, Scotland. He graduated with a 2:1 in Geography in 2005.

After a period of work experience, Prince William joined the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst as an Officer Cadet.

He was commissioned as an army officer in front of Her Majesty The Queen at Sandhurst in December 2006 and joined the Household Cavalry (Blues and Royals) as a Second Lieutenant.

[NI5224] Sources

[S11934] GENDEX database Moore, Melaney Moore (Dodson), melaney@acs.tamu.eedu

[S15725] GENDEX database mladair, Matthew L. Adair (mladair@concentric.nett).

[S15744] GENDEX database dbingham, Douglas Bingham (dkbingham@compuserve.ccom).

[S15663] GENDEX database In_Search_Of_The_Son, Robert E. Wiley (rwiley@dalllas.net).

[S15683] GENDEX database dwmerrill7, Roots-L archive, author unknown. Hosted by Deane Merrill
(dwmerrill@lbl.gov).

[S15599] GENDEX database dwmerrill10, Melissa Ives McDermeit, melissa.mcdermeit@banyan.ummed.edu.

[S15635] GENDEX database dwmerrill6, by Marjorie Y.B. Wolff (user100173@aool.com), hosted by Deane Merrill
(dwmerrill@lbl.gov).

[NI5233] Nicolaus Hauck (Houck, Houk, etc.) was the son of Peter Hauck and wife Anna Maria Schwedner. He was born 26 Nov 1749 and baptized 15 April 1750 at Zion's (Moselem) Evangelical Lutheran Church, Richmond Twp., Berks (not Bucks) Co., PA. I descend from his older sister, Anna Maria, who was baptized there 6 Feb 1747 (aged "11 weeks tomorrow"). She was married 25 Dec 1764 at Trinity Lutheran Church,
Reading, Berks Co., PA, to Friederich Mauser. His father, Peter Hauck "of Greenwich Twp., yeoman" died shortly before 31 Jan 1761, when Letters of Administration were granted to his widow, who would later marry Thomas Winckler of Maidencreek Twp., Berks Co. The Haucks, Mausers and Wincklers migrated to Lincoln Co., NC, in the late 1760's and settled along Clarke's Creek in present-day Catawba Co.

[NI5249] The Apothecary's Inn at Capt. Kitchell's Mansion Pana, Illinois

Built circa 1876 by Captain John Kitchell's, a friend of Abraham Lincoln. Contact the Innkeepers

Built circa 1876 by Captain John Kitchell's, a friend of Abraham Lincoln's. There's a tulip tree on the property that is reported to be the oldest tree in Illinois. Three miles from Terrace Golf Course and 20 miles from Lake Shelbyville. The exterior of the house is Second Empire style and the interior is High Victorian...4 marble fireplaces, one 6'x 8' gold ceiling medallion, 5+ chandeliers. The food will be very upscale and cooking classes will be offered. Rooms: 4 Baths: 4 Private Breakfast: Full Rates: $85-$125

The Apothecary's Inn at Capt. Kitchell's Mansion is a member of the following associations: Illinois Bed & Breakfast Association

The Apothecary's Inn at Capt. Kitchell's Mansion
208 South Spruce St.
Pana, Illinois 62557
(217) 562-3108
Paula Dunlap, Innkeeper

Captain John W. Kitchell served as a Captain for Abraham Lincoln both before and during his presidency. He was "said" to have been one of those who escorted the President back to Springfield on his "final" trip home to be laid to rest. In 1876 he erected the three story home at 208 Spruce. The site is at the top of the highest point in Pana and is said that the Captain selected this high point to look over the city and out into the Illinois prairie. The home still reflects the Second Empire design, mansard roof, central tower, and front and side verandas. It is now the location of the "The Apothecary Inn", one of the states premier Bed & breakfasts, owned and maintained by Paula Dunlap.

[NI5263] Maro G. LAVERTY was born on 28 Jul 1867. He died in 1958 in Pueblo, Colo. (20) He farmed at Boone, Colo.
They had no children. He has record identification number 3615.(3) He has Ancestral File number 15.(4)

He was married to Alice Stella BARTLES (daughter of Rev. J. N. BARTLES and Orril B. BARTLES) on 12 Jun 1906.
Alice Stella BARTLES was born on 15 Oct 1876 in Roxbury, Kansas. She died on 7 Jun 1950. She has record
identification number - none assigned.

[NI5289] Hannah (Ball or Belle?)Swaidner born Mar. 12, 1836 Columbiana Co. OH Died Feb. 19, 1913 rural Brooklyn, Poweshiek Co. IA buried Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. She married Benjamin Franklin Connell Mar. 29, 1859 Columbiana Co. OH Married by Samuel H. Bennett, JP. Benjamin was born Feb. 17, 1832, the son of Amos and Nancy Anna (Hestand) Connell, in Columbiana Co. OH. He died Oct. 15, 1898 Poweshiek Co. IA. Buried Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. (Per Hannah's obit: They lived at Georgetown, OH after marriage until 1869 (*I think it was 1867 they came to Iowa) when they moved to Poweshiek Co. IA. She joined the Church of the Brethren about 52 years ago (1861)......

Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Hannah was born in Columbiana, Ohio, March 12, 1836. Hannah was the daughter of David and Catherine (Clippinger) Swaidner. Hannah died February 19, 1913 in Poweshiek, County, Iowa at 76 years of age. Her body was interred in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery, Brooklyn, IA. Per her obit: She joined the Church of the Brethern about fifty-two years ago and has always been an active member. She has made her home all winter with her daughter, Mrs. Geroge Wheeler, of Victor. Mrs. Connell has had poor health for several months..... Ben is listed as a member of the Reading Church of the Brethern Columbiana County, Ohio as a child. The reading Church of the Brethern included the distric of the German Baptist Brethern. Church practices were that of the Dunkards. Ben is shown in the Columbiana County Centre Township, Ohio census of 1850. Ben and Hannah came to Iowa from Ohio by covered wagon in 1867 (Per his obit). Per his obit: He joined the Brethern Chruch, and for thirty seven years (1861) a faithful member. About eight years ago he began preaching, which he continued till the last. Ben taught in the neighborhood country school in Warren township.

[NI5290] Submitted by Lisa Connell-Johnson

JASON Ward's family follows:
He married Charity Elizabeth Mercer 1873. She was the daughter of Daniel and Eliza Mercer.
1. Mary E. Galbreath b. Oct. 13, 1879; died Jan. 26, 1889 buried N. Georgetown. (She is the little girl at their side in the picture ~ must have been taken not too long before she died)
2. Marion D. Galbreath
3. Jessie F. Galbreath
Jason's bio states.... At the age of twenty-one, as a carpenter and builder, in which he became quite proficient...... After working at this trade three years he purchased a farm, where he now resides(1901), and since that time has given his attention exclusively to the pursuit of agriculture. His improvements are of a high order, and as a farmer he ranks with the best in the township (Butler)..... Politcally Mr. Galbreath is a republican, and in religion belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, as does also his wife.

[NI5294] NOTES: His grand palace at Versailles afforded the ideal setting for his lavish court. Louis razed the city's
medieval walls, built the Invalides as a home for disabled veterans, planned the great avenue of the
Champs-Elysees, and refurbished the Cathedral of Notre Dame. His personal example of long, dedicated rule
made France the bureaucratic model for 18th century, absolutist Europe. His first wife, Marie-Therese, was his
double first cousin.

[NI5304] Joseph KITCHEL was born on 19 Apr 1971 in Anaconda, Montana. He has record identification number
- none assigned. Attended schools in Gillette, Wyoming and Anaconda, Mont. and graduated from Anaconda
Senior High in 1989. After graduation he joined the US Air Force in 1989. He has had various assignments in
Turkey, Korea, Saudia Aradia to name just a few.

He was married to Jennifer ALLEN (daughter of Robert ALLEN and Sandra WYANT) on 16 Apr 1994 in Morgan,
Utah. Jennifer ALLEN was born on 9 May 1974 in Deer Lodge, Montana. She has record identification
number - none assigned.

[NI5315] NOTES: Edward VIII, King of England; later titled as: Duke of Windsor when he abdicated the throne to marry Mrs. Wallis Warfield Simpson. Christened: Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David. Reign: 20 Jan 1936 to 11 Dec 1936. His reign was only 326 days long. Title: Edward VIII, King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and Emperor of India. He abdicated in favor of his brother, the Duke of York, who became King George VI. Edward married Mrs. Simpson in June of 1937. Because his wife was not accorded the privileges of a royal Duchess in England, the Duke of Windsor resided abroad. In 1937 he observed social and housing conditions in Germany and visited Adolf Hitler. During World War II he served as a Major General in the British Expeditionary Froce, and he was a governor of the Bahama Islands from 1940 to 1945. After the war he lived as a private British citizen, chiefly in the United States and France. At the funeral of George VI in Feb. 1952, he took part in a British royal ceremony for the first time since his abdication. The Duke wrote, "A King's Story" (1951) which was made into a film in 1967, and "Windsor Revisited" (1960). Edward was a Freemason. Tsarevich Nicholas II and his finance, Alix were the godparents at Edward's baptism. Seven different names of the Duke of Windsor: 1. Prince Edward of York 2. Prince Edward of Cornwall and York 3. Duke of Cornwall 4. Edward, Prince of Wales 5. King Edward VIII 6. Prince Edward 7. Duke of Windsor. He is famous for popularizing a fat symmetrical knot for a necktie called the Windsor knot.

[NI5316] Sources

[S11934] GENDEX database Moore, Melaney Moore (Dodson), melaney@acs.tamu.eedu

[S15725] GENDEX database mladair, Matthew L. Adair (mladair@concentric.nett).

[S15744] GENDEX database dbingham, Douglas Bingham (dkbingham@compuserve.ccom).

[S15663] GENDEX database In_Search_Of_The_Son, Robert E. Wiley (rwiley@dalllas.net).

[S15683] GENDEX database dwmerrill7, Roots-L archive, author unknown. Hosted by Deane Merrill
(dwmerrill@lbl.gov).

[S15599] GENDEX database dwmerrill10, Melissa Ives McDermeit, melissa.mcdermeit@banyan.ummed.edu.

[S15635] GENDEX database dwmerrill6, by Marjorie Y.B. Wolff (user100173@aool.com), hosted by Deane Merrill
(dwmerrill@lbl.gov).

[NI5318] Desiderius, King of the Lombards


Born: ?
Died: ?

Father: ?
Mother: ?

Married (1): ?
Children: Desideria

King of the Lombards 756-774

Desiderius was the last king of the Lombards, defeated by Charlemagne and Pope Hadrian I in 773-774.
Charlemagne took the Lombard crown and sent Desiderius and his family into Frankish monasteries.

[NI5323] NOTES: Reign: 1437-60; A regency led by the Douglas family ruled until 1449, when James began to govern
by himself. In 1460, at the head of an army, he was killed during the siege of Roxburgh Castle.

James II, King of Scotland

Birth
1430, Edinburgh, Scotland
Death
1460, Roxburgh Castle, Scotland
Father
James I, King of Scotland
Mother
Joan BEAUFORT

Family: Marie of Gueldres

1.James III, King of Scotland
2.Alexander, Duke of Albany
3.John, Earl of Mar
4.Mary

NOTES: Reign: 1437-60; A regency led by the Douglas family ruled until 1449, when James began to govern
by himself. In 1460, at the head of an army, he was killed during the siege of Roxburgh Castle.

[NI5328] Mary Harriet FINK(9) was born on 29 Oct 1862. She died on 27 Jul 1955 in Boaz, Alabama. She has
record identification number 3620.(10) She has Ancestral File number 19.(4) She attended Simpson College at
Indianola, Iowa and taught schools at Indianola, Des Moines, Bedford, Iowa and other places. She and her sister
Clara taught school at Boaz, Ala., under the auspices of the Homes Missionary Soc., of the Methodist Church. Their
school developed and they joined the faculty of the Snead Junior College at Boaz and at "Founders Day" at the
school, May 24, 1945, the sisters, who had devoted their lives to the education of the children of the neighborhood,
were signally honored as "the Little Women."

She was married to Rev. W.C. MARTIN on 5 Nov 1874. Was 2nd husband. They had no children. Rev. W.C.
MARTIN was a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. He has record identification number 713. (3)

[NI5343] NOTES: Title: Duke of Gloucester; Died following an affliction of the nervous system. Christened: Henry William Frederick Albert

[NI5354] Itta


Born: 592
Died: 652

Father: Arnoldus, Margrave of Schelde
Mother: Oda

Married (1): Pepin I, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Children:
Grimoald, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Saint Begga

Itta was the wife of the Austrasian Mayor Pepin I. According to later Carolingian Frankish mythology, Itta was the
daughter of Arnoldus, a Margrave of Schelde and Oda. Arnoldus was the son of Blithildis (suposed to be a daughter
of King Chlotar I of the Franks, however he had no such daughter) and Ansbertus. Ansbertus was the son of
Deuteria and another Scheldian Margrave Ansbertus Ferreolus. Ansbertus was the son of Tonantius, son of Papinilla
and Tonantius Ferreolus (c420-c475). Papinilla was said to be a daughter of the Roman Emperor Avitus, and
Tonantius Ferreolus said to be a grandson of the Roman general Syagrius who was kicked out of Gaul by King Clovis
I of the Salian Franks.

[NI5355] Prince Harry is an officer in the British Army. He is a second Lieutenant in the Household Cavalry (Blues and Royals). Prince Harry has also founded a charity called Sentebale with Prince Seeiso of Lesotho to help children orphaned by Aids.

Prince Harry is the younger son of The Prince of Wales and Diana, Princess of Wales. He was born at 4.20pm on 15th September, 1984 at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, in central London. He weighed 6lb 14oz.

On 21st December 1984, Prince Henry Charles Albert David was christened by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Robert Runcie, in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.

After attending Mrs Mynors School, Prince Harry became a pupil at Wetherby School in London, from September 1987. In September 1992, Harry joined his older brother William at Ludgrove School in Berkshire where he stayed for five years.

He then attended Eton College from September 1998 where he took his GCSE’s and A Levels.

After completing his A Levels, Prince Harry took a gap year during which he visited Australia, Argentina and Africa, where he made a documentary about the plight of orphans in Lesotho.

Prince Harry passed the Regular Commissions Board and entered Sandhurst in May 2005. He successfully completed a 44-week training course as an Officer Cadet, before being Commissioned in April 2006 as a Cornet in the Blues and Royals. He was posted to Windsor in May 2006 as a Troop Leader in the Household Cavalry Regiment.

[NI5356] Nancy Jane KITCHEL (photo) was born on 2 Mar 1838 in West Creek, Ind.. She died on 13 Apr 1887 in
Winterset, Iowa. She has Ancestral File number 4. (4) She has record identification number 711. (8)

She was married to Robert FINK (son of V.P. FINK and Louisa P. WESCOTT) on 25 Oct 1860. Robert FINK was
born on 24 Sep 1836 in Scott County, Missouri. He served in the military in Apr 1862. He was a Sergeant in Co. E.
23rd Iowa Vol. Infantry. He was killed in the battle of Millikens Bend. He died on 7 Jun 1863 in Vicksburg, Virgina. He
has record identification number 712.(3) Nancy Jane KITCHEL and Robert FINK had the following children:

+16 i. Clara Louisa FINK.
17 ii. Mary Harriet FINK(9) was born on 29 Oct 1862. She died on 27 Jul 1955 in Boaz, Alabama. She has
record identification number 3620.(10) She has Ancestral File number 19.(4) She attended Simpson College at
Indianola, Iowa and taught schools at Indianola, Des Moines, Bedford, Iowa and other places. She and her sister
Clara taught school at Boaz, Ala., under the auspices of the Homes Missionary Soc., of the Methodist Church. Their
school developed and they joined the faculty of the Snead Junior College at Boaz and at "Founders Day" at the
school, May 24, 1945, the sisters, who had devoted their lives to the education of the children of the neighborhood,
were signally honored as "the Little Women."

She was married to Rev. W.C. MARTIN on 5 Nov 1874. Was 2nd husband. They had no children. Rev. W.C.
MARTIN was a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. He has record identification number 713. (3)

[NI5358] Grimoald, Mayor of the Palace of Neustria


Born: ?
Died: 714

Father: Pepin II, of Heristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Mother: Plectudis

Married (1): ?
Children:
Theudoald, Mayor of the Palace of Neustria

Mayor of the Palace of Neustria 687-714

In 687, Austrasian Mayor Pepin II defeated the Neustrian Mayor Ebroin, and took with him the leading noble
titles in Gaul. He instated his son Drogo on in the Palace of Burgundy, and Grimoald in the Palace of Neustria,
keeping Austrasia for himself. Drogo died in 708. Pepin himself died in 714, and that year Grimoald was
murdered. His son Theudoald succeed him to the Palace.

[NI5365] Himiltrude


Born: ?
Died: ?

Father: ?
Mother: ?

Married (1): Charlemagne, Frankish Emperor
Children:
Pepin the Hunchback

Himiltrude was the first wife of Charlemagne, married to him before he became king, who bore him only one
son (deformed). They were never divorced, but Charlemagne neglected her and went on to marry four more
times (no other two at once) and have many other children with them.

[NI5372] Pepin II, King of Aquitaine


Born: ?
Died: 870

Father: Pepin I, King of Aquitaine
Mother: ?

Married (1): ?
Children: ?

King of Aquitaine 838-860

In 838, Pepin I died, and while the Emperor Louis the Pious wanted to put his son Charles the Bald on the
throne of Aquitaine, the nobles put up Pepin's son. However, neither had authority to rule. Pepin II finally
received his kingdom under the soverignty of Charles (as King of France) after the Treaty of Verdun in 843. In
860, the Burgundian princes and King Pepin II invited Louis the German, Charles's half brother, to invade
France. He was forced to pull out later that year by the clergy. Pepin died that year.

[NI5373] Doda


Born: ?
Died: ?

Father: ?
Mother: ?

Married (1): Saint Arnulf, Bishop of Metz
Children:
Ansegisel

Doda married Arnulf, a powerful Austrasian noble during the time of Mayor Pepin I, and their two children
Ansegisel and Begga were married.

[NI5375] Louis II, Frankish Emperor


Born: c822
Died: 875

Father: Lothar I, Frankish Emperor
Mother: Irmengard

Married (1): Engeberge
Children:
Irmengard

King of Italy 855-875
Frankish Emperor 855-875

When Emperor Lothar I died in 855, his lands went to his three sons: Louis II (Italy and the Imperial crown),
Lothar II (Lotharingia), and Charles (Provence). When Charles died in 863, King Charles II of France and King
Louis II of Germany divided up Provence. They did the same with Lotharingia in 868, even when Emperor
Louis II, backed by Pope Hadrian II, sought for a piece of the inheritance. In 875, Emperor Louis died, and
Charles of France succeeded him to the Imperial crown.

[NI5383] NOTES: Reign: 1483-85; Although Richard, the last king of the house of York, did usurp the throne, little doubt
exists that his unscrupulousness has been overemphasized by his enemies and by Tudor historians seeking to
strengthen the Lancastrian position. His baseness is strongly exaggerated in Shakepeare's play, Richard III. He is
said to have murdered his nephews, Edward V and Richard, Duke of York in 1483 (called the Princes in the Tower).
Richard III met his death at the Battle of Bosworth.

[NI5391] Bernard


Born: ?
Died: ?

Father: Charles Martel, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Mother: Chrotrud

Married (1): ?
Children:
Adalard
Wala

Bernard was a son of the Charles Martel, the powerful Austrasian Mayor of the Palace, and uncle of the
Frankish Emperor Charlemagne. When the latter launched his Italian conquest in 773-4, Bernard led half of
the Frankish army.

[NI5407] Pepin the Hunchback


Born: ?
Died: 811

Father: Charlemagne, Frankish Emperor
Mother: Himiltrude

Married (1): ?
Children: ?

Pepin was the oldest son of Charlemagne, but was deformed. The Franks feared deformity, and so Pepin
could never hold any official authority, but he was well treated and always welcome at court.

[NI5413] Saint Clotild


Born: c470
Died: 545

Father: Chilperic II, King of the Burgundians
Mother: ?

Married (1): Clovis I, King of the Franks
Children:
Ingomer
Chlodomer, King of Orleans
Childebert I, King of Paris
Chlothar I, King of the Franks
Chrotilda

Clotilda was the younger daughter of King Chilperic II of the Burgundians. On her father's murder by her
uncles, she and her sister Chroma escaped Burgundy. Clotilda married Clovis, King of the Franks, in 493 and
had with him five children. She was the person primarily responsible for Clovis' conversion to Christianity, and,
therefore, the conversion of all of France. At Clovis' death in 511, Clotilda went into a monastery at Tours
where she stayed until her death in 545. She was canonized a few years after her death, and her traditional
feast day is June 3.

[NI5416] Copied from The Pacific County Press, October 20, 1999

A son, Jacob Todd Stroyzk was born on Wednesday, October 13, 1999 at 9:27 PM at St. Peter Hospital to Brenda and Todd Stroyzk of South Bend, (Pacific County, Washington). He weighed in at 7 pounds 10 ounces and was 20 1/2 inches long. The proud grandparents are Steve and Sandy Evertson of Raymond, Patricia Hamilton and Charles Stroyzk of Longview.

[NI5458] Elizabeth (Isabel), Princess


Born: 7 AUG 1282, Rhuddlan Castle, Carnarvon
Died: 5 MAY 1316, Quendon, Essex
Interred: 23 MAY 1316, Walden Abbey, Essex

Father: , Edward I (Longshanks), King of England, b. 17 JUN 1239

Mother: , Eleanor of Castile, Cts de Ponthieu, b. ABT 1244

Married 18 JAN 1297, Ipswich Priory Church, Suffolk to , John I of Holland, Count of Holland

Married 14 NOV 1302, Westminster Abbey, London, England to de Bohun, Humphrey, Earl of Hereford4 &
Essex

Child 1: de Bohun, John of Hereford, Earl of Hereford9 & Essex, b. 23 NOV 1305
Child 2: de Bohun, Humphrey of Hereford, Earl of Hereford 10 Essex, b. 6 DEC 1309
Child 3: de Bohun, William of Northampton, Earl of Northampton, b. ABT 1311
Child 4: de Bohun, Alianore, b. 1304
Child 5: de Bohun, Margaret, b. 3 APR 1311
Child 6: de Bohun, Edward, b. ABT 1311
Child 7: de Bohun, Eneas, b. ABT 1314
Child 8: de Bohun, Edmund
Child 9: de Bohun, Hugh, b. ABT 1303
Child 10: de Bohun, Mary, b. 1305
Child 11: de Bohun, Isabella, b. 1316

[NI5462] de Bohun, Elizabeth


Died: 1385

Father: de Bohun, William of Northampton, Earl of Northampton, b. ABT 1311

Mother: de Badlesmere, Elizabeth

Married ABT 1359 to Fitzalan, Richard, Earl of Arundel 11th

Child 1: Fitzalan, Thomas, Earl of Arundel 12th, b. 13 OCT 1381
Child 2: Fitzalan, Elizabeth D'Arundelle
Child 3: Fitzalan, Margaret
Child 4: Fitzalan, Alice
Child 5: Fitzalan, Richard, b. BEF 1397

[NI5480] Esther LAVERTY was born on 1 Nov 1858 in Palmyra, Iowa. She died on 30 Mar 1939 in Des Moines, Iowa.
She was buried in Berwick Cemetery N.E. of Des Moines. She has record identification number 3612.(3) She has
Ancestral File number 13.(4) They lived at 1801 Des Moines St., Des Moines, Iowa.

She was married to Levi Oliver LANE. They lived at 1801 Des Moines St., Des Moines, Iowa. They had lived in Des
Moines 76 years. Levi Oliver LANE was born on 13 Mar 1861 in Tiffin, Ohio. He died on 21 Nov 1938 in Des
Moines, Iowa. He was buried in Berwick Cemetery N.E. of Des Moines. He was a contractor and builder. He has
record identification number 3613.(3) Esther LAVERTY and Levi Oliver LANE had the following children:

+47 i. Ira E. LANE.
+48 ii. Lucy LANE.
+49 iii. Edna LANE.

[NI5481] Elizabeth Luella LAVERTY was born on 3 Apr 1856 in Palmyra, Iowa. She died in Aug 1931 in Winterset,
Iowa. She was buried in Coon Rapids, Iowa. She has record identification number 3610.(3) She has Ancestral File
number 12.(4)

She was married to David TITUS on 26 Aug 1875.(19) They had no children. David TITUS was born on 2 Jan 1849
in College View, Nebraska. He died in 1927 in Coon Rapids, Iowa. He was buried in Coon Rapids, Iowa. He was a
carpenter in College View, Nebraska. He has record identification number 3611. (3)

[NI5497] John Baldwin

MALE
BIRTH: 24 Jun 1619, Aston-Clinton, Bucks County, England [Ref#63,#70,#107,#113]
DEATH: 21 Jun 1681, Milford, Connecticut, America [Ref#107,#11
NOTE : Also listed as James. [Ref#127]
NOTE : 1638, He immigrated to America.
BURIAL: 21 Jun 1681, Milford, Connecticut, America

Notes

Family 1: Mary Camp ....(? ~ )

MARRIAGE: 1639, Milford, Connecticut

1.John Baldwin ....(ABT 1640 ~ Aug 1706) Milford, Connecticut, America S» C»
2.Josiah Baldwin ....(1642 ~ ABT 1683) S»
3.Samuel Baldwin ....(1645 ~ 16 Jan 1670/71)
4.Nathaniel Cooper Baldwin ....(26 Mar 1648 ~ ) S»
5.Elizabeth Baldwin ....(19 Aug 1649 ~ ) S»
6.Joseph Baldwin ....(9 Nov 1651 ~ 1719) S»

Family 2: Mary Bruen ....(1634 ~ 2 Sep 1670 ) Shrewsbury, Salop, England P»

MARRIAGE: 13 Oct 1653 [Ref#84,#127]

1.Mary Baldwin ....(7 Sep 1654 ~ ) Milford, Connecticut, America
2.Sarah Baldwin ....(25 Dec 1655 ~ 1 Jan 1728/29) Milford, Connecticut, America S»
3.Abigail Baldwin ....(15 Nov 1658 ~ ) New Haven, Connecticut, America S» C»
4.Obadiah Baldwin ....(29 Oct 1660 ~ 8 Jan 1737/38) Milford, Connecticut, America S»
5.George Baldwin ....(1662 ~ 26 Oct 1728) Milford, Connecticut, America S»
6.Hannah Baldwin ....(20 Nov 1663 ~ ) Milford, Connecticut, Ameri
7.Richard Baldwin ....(Jun 1665 ~ ) S»

Notes

Ref#107:
This John is the son of John BALDWIN who died about 1637 in Bucks Co.,
England, and who had a wife Hannah.

Ancestors probably:

1. William BALDWIN (1441 - ) & Jane AYLESBURY
2. Sir John BALDWIN (11 Aug 1470 - )
3. Richard BALDWIN (1503 - )
4. Henry O. BALDWIN (1529 - )
5. John BALDWIN I (1565 - 14 Oct 1637) & Hannah ?
>> 6. John BALDWIN II (24 Jun 1619 - ) & Mary CAMP ( - Before 1653)

Ref#168:
{is this his son John?}
pg. xxxv
John Baldwin, "of Newark in the Government of New England," made his wi
December 25, 1688. If was proved before a single Justice, thus:
"Appeared before me, John Curtis & John Browne this 28 of November 1689
& took oath that this is to the best of their knowledge the Last will &
Testament of John Baldwin of Newark Lately Deceased
"Thomas Johnson Justice."

The following entry is interesting, as showing the simple and apparently
entirely satisfacory method of getting an authoritative constructi
will:
"Whereas William Camp & Seth Tompkins overseers of the Last will of
John Baldwin deceased, convinced {convened} the Justices of Newark
together (namely Mr John Ward, & Mr Thomas Johnson) to give their sen
Approbation of what might be most sutable to the settling of what Lands
belong to the heire.
"Our sence is that the sd Lands spoken of in the sd will, willed to his
daugher Hannah Tichenor, be settled vpon the son of John Baldwin Junir &
the profits of the same fore the time to come, only the crop vpon the
ground, Ebenezer Lindly is to take it off, without any molestation, this
we give as our Apprehention this :20th: of June :1691:
"John Ward Justice
"Thomas Johnson Justice."

Ref#63:
Came to Connecticut with the other Milford, Baldwins. John Baldwin's
name was very common in Bucks , England at that time. He might have
been brother of Sylvester? Sylvester died on the passage in 1638. May
have been cousin of Sylvester? Unlikely, a nephew? February, 1639,
Milford, Conn. Was purchased from the Indians, settlement made during
the year and Nov 29, 1639 the name "free" planters appears in Milford
Records. John Baldwin was considered a "settler", because he was not a
church member. Milford was a religious community or colony. He joined
the church March 19, 1648. His homestead was orginal lot #13, in
Milford, on west side of the river. A little north west of the town
hall, on the premises now or lately occuppied by Rev. Asa M.
Train(1875). He moved to Newark, N.J. a year or after 1666, but
returned to Milford.

[NI5501] NOTES: Queen consort (1538-42) of James V of Scotland and regent of Scotland (1554-60); also known as Mary of Lorraine. The widowed daughter of the French soldier Claude de Lorraine, 1st duc de Guise (1496-1550). Mary married King James in 1538. After his death in 1542, she engaged in a power struggle with James Hamilton, 3rd earl of Arran (c.1517-75), who had been appointed regent for his infant daughter, Mary, Queen of Scots. In 1548 she arranged her daughter's betrothal to the French Dauphin. Mary secured Arran's resignation and succeeded him as regent in 1554. When she began persecuting the Scottish Protestants in 1559, they rebelled against her. Both France and England intervened in the struggle, which ended with Mary's
death.

Mary STUART, Queen of Scots

Birth 7 DEC 1542, Linlithgow, Scotland
Death 8 FEB 1587, England
Father James V, King of Scotland
Mother Mary of Guise

Family 1: Francis II, King of France

Marriage 24 APR 1558, Paris, France

Family 2: Henry STUART, Lord Darnley

Marriage 29 JUL 1565, Edinburgh, Scotland

1.James I STUART, King of England

Family 3: James HEPBURN, Earl Bothwell-4

Marriage ABT 1567

NOTES: Mary became a prisoner of Queen Elizabeth I and in the ensuing intrigues to rescue her and place her on the throne of Elizabeth, the most famous was that of Mary's page, Anthony Babington, who plotted to assassinate Elizabeth. The conspiracy was discovered, and Mary was brought to trial in October 1586. She was sentenced to death on October 25, but not until Feb. 1, 1587 did Elizabeth sign the warrant of execution. She was beheaded a week later.

Mary was but a girl of 15 when she married Francis with whom she had been brought up. Francis, a year younger, adored Mary and she bore him a strong sisterly affection. He was a weak and sickly child, and it is unlikely that the marriage was ever consummated. Francis fell ill with an ear infection in November 1560 and was dead by 5th December, just over two and a half years after their union.

[NI5502] Ruled from 1603 to 1625
Mary gave birth to James on 19 June 1566 at Edinburgh Castle. It was a difficult birth and the child that was born was frail. Rumour soon spread which would haunt James for the rest of his life. The first of these rumours was that James was not Lord Darnley's child but Bothwell's. This can be dismissed by the fact that at the time of his conception, Mary was still infatuated with Darnley, and by the child's resemblance to his father. Secondly, there is a theory that James actually died at birth and was replaced by one of Erskine, Lord of Mar's child. This is substantiated by the remains of a baby skeleton found within the walls of Edinburgh Castle in the 18th century. This again is highly unlikely.

On 17 December 1566 James was christened at Stirling Castle according to Catholic rites. Darnley was as per usual absent, and so was the godmother, Queen Elizabeth I who merely sent a gold font and a representative who remained outside in protest of the Catholic ceremony.

While incarcerated at Lochleven Mary, under duress, signed her abdication in favour of her son. James aged only 13 months, was crowned on 29 July 1567 in a Protestant church outside Stirling Castle. Mary's half-brother, the Earl of Moray, finally reached his goal by becoming Regent.

By May 1568 Mary had escaped from Lochleven and retreated to England after the Battle of Langside. Moray was assassinated in 1570 and the Earl of Lennox, Darnley's father, took over as Regent. He died in a foray in 1571 before James's very eyes. He was succeeded by the Earl of Mar and then by the Earl of Morton in 1573.

James was brought up under the strict Presbyterianism of his senior tutor, George Buchanan, staunch enemy of Mary, in the stern atmosphere of the Mars, his guardians. The result was a highly intellectual and well-educated young man with a wry sense of humour but with a craving for love which was to be his downfall. He inherited some of his mother's traits. James did not inherit his parent's good looks.
He was of middle height but he was born with bent legs which impaired his walking throughout his life. Nevertheless, James developed the same love of horse-riding and the outdoors as his mother had.Like her he enjoyed a glamorous court life, surrounding himself with poets and musicians. He was also very fond of pun games, a tendency which Mary displayed herself in her embroideries.

James was characterised by a mixture of self-confidence and self-indulgence. He was a misogynist but needed to produce heirs. He married Anne of Denmark and had seven children although only two survived. His marriage was described as being as happy as a royal marriage could be. It is safe to assume that marital relations continued for at least sixteen years despite James's obvious sexual preferences.

Aged 13, James had experienced his first romantic feelings with a French connection of the Stuarts, Esme Stuart Sieur d'Aubigny. The latterquickly rising to Duke of Lennox and having the Earl of Morton arrested and executed in 1581 for his role in the murder of Lord Darnley. On 22 August 1582, the Earl of Gowrie kidnapped James and forced him to issue a proclamation against Esme. James was devastated.

He later became infatuated with Robert Carr, a very good-looking young man of Scottish descent and twenty years his junior. They met at a tournament during which Carr broke his leg. James attracted attention to them by fussing over him and kissing him in public. Thanks to James's devotion Carr became the first Scot to enter the House of Lords and considerably wealthy. His most outstanding quality however was insolence. Then followed George Villiers, James's greatest love, whom he liked to call his "sweet child and wife". George too was handsome but arrogant and corrupt. And so, just as his mother's love life had scandalised her contemporaries, so did his.

James asked no questions about his mother. He would never see her again after her quick visit in April 1567 and George Buchanan instilled in his mind the portrait of an adulteress and a murderess. He received few of the gifts that she sent him from her prisons in England and was deprived of any maternal love. Against this background, his indifference towards his mother finds an explanation. Fontenay, Mary's emissary, reported rightly or not, that James did love his mother. There are also conflicting stories about James's feelings towards Mary. Upon her death some report that he said "Now I am sole King", and some that he retired without eating, others still that he remained totally impassive. James's conscience seems to have nagged him about the subject of his mother later on in life. He derided George Buchanan's lies about Mary in his book "Detection", he instructed Camden to give her due honour for her sufferings, and castigated Moray in his "Basilikon Doron". In 1612 he had Mary's body transferred to Westminster Abbey on the suggestion of Northampton, a secret catholic. It nevertheless remains that James conveniently rejected his mother's appeals to rule jointly and form an Association, giving preference to an alliance with Elizabeth. It is hard not to see in that a rather self-centred and opportunist character.

The Juggle and Rule Principle Being born in Scotland and spending the first 36 years of his life there gave James an advantage which his mother had been lacking. Mary had been baffled by the deviousness of her times and the warring factions of the Scottish nobility. James, on the other hand would master the art of keeping his options open at all levels.

James had inherited a poor country divided by religious factions and Stewart rivalry with the Crown. Parliament, known as the Estates, consisted of a single and weak chamber. James's main claim was that the Sovereign's right was derived straight from God. He favoured the Episcopalian Church with bishops and the King at its Head. Presbyterians however claimed that the ecclesiastical power was above the Crown. Nevertheless, both sides co-existed in relative harmony during his reign. His juggle and rule principle involved enlisting the help of Catholics such as Huntly and Lord Maxwell to protect himself against the Presbyterians, but secretly so as not to offend the Protestant Elizabeth and her valuable financial resources. On the other hand, he would restore Presbyterianism to sweet-talk its ministers into counteracting the power of the Catholics.

The lawlessness of the Scottish aristocracy was a little more difficult to deal with. James felt that it was time for a middle party: "Between foolish rashness and extreme length, there is a middle way". He thus proceeded to turn his attention to the middle classes while placating co-operative Lords with lands and forcing uncooperative ones out of the country. There followed a period of economic growth and political
stability long overdue which lasted for forty years. Unfortunately, this prosperity did not stretch to the King's own finances. James by then, had his eyes seriously set on the English Crown.

James's claims to the English Throne

It is true that James's existence in itself was the fruit of Mary's efforts to produce an heir who would acquire the English Crown which she herself could have had claim to. However, James's greed in this respect shows a rather sinister side of him. The argument finds its source in Henry VIII's will. According to this will, no alien was to succeed to the Crown of England. James, being three-quarters Scottish and
one-quarter French was therefore excluded. His father's brother had had a daughter, Arbella Stuart who was English and was a very strong contestant to the Crown. She was English but had weak protestant views. As a child, she had kept Mary company during her incarceration in England and Mary had been so fond of her as to make provisions for her in her will. James first made sure that she did not marry and when she finally eloped with William Seymour, grandson of Lady Catherine Grey, he had her imprisoned in the Tower where she died in 1615. It has been suggested that James's ascension to the English throne had been plotted for a long time by Cecil, Elizabeth's secretary, through secret correspondence with James. Whatever the case may be, Elizabeth died peacefully on 24 March 1603 and James was naturally proclaimed King.

The court of King James was a stark contrast to the court of Queen Elizabeth. James was neither used to nor enjoyed ceremony. His response to his people's welcome was "God's wounds, I will pull down my breeches and they shall also see my arse". Drunkenness was rife and in 1606, when the King of Denmark came to visit, it spread to the ladies while the performers staggered in corners unable to finish their performance. Further, James had no experience of the English Parliament. The latter was responsible for legal grants, direct taxation and the Crown was badly indebted. Coupled with James's generosity towards all of those whose love he attempted to buy, it was a recipe for disaster.

James would dissolve Parliaments upon Parliaments forever disputing the meaning of royal prerogative and in vain trying to obtain more funds for his ventures. James also clashed with the Puritans whom he associated with the Scottish Presbyterians and who became the party of dissent. At the same time, he failed to relax laws against Catholics and conjured up Spain's displeasure. By the Great Contract he struck a deal with Parliament in order to curb his debts but the English began to romanticise Elizabeth and her reign. In 1605, Guy Fawkes and others tried to blow up the monarch by placing gunpowder in a room next to the House of Lords the day before James was due to open Parliament. This plot was betrayed by an anonymous letter and continues to be celebrated every year on 5 November. It has been suggested that Cecil was behind this or that the government knew about it but was waiting for the most appropriate moment to uncover it, i.e. the opening of Parliament. James remained in constant fear for his life.

James, The Visionary

In many ways, James was ahead of his times. His love of wildlife and in particular his obsession with lions prompted him to import exotic animals into Britain which were kept in the Tower of London. He introduced horse-racing and bred horses with the finest Arab blood.

One of James's pet hates was smoking which he desecrated in his book "Counterblaste to Tobacco". In 1600 he insisted on starting the Scottish New Year on 1st January like the rest of Europe, while England continued to celebrate it on 25th March for another century and a half. He translated the Bible which became the Authorised Version of the Bible. But behind this religious lay a fanatical hatred and
pathological fear of witchcraft, epitomised in his other book "Daemonology". The most notorious witch trial in Scotland, The Trial of the Berwick Witches, revolved around a group of people who were accused of stirring up a storm in an attempt to drown James and his new wife on their voyage back from Denmark. He made proposals for unity in Great Britain and economic integration which did come to be
realised although not in his lifetime. James was responsible for the building of magnificent halls in England such as Hatfield Hall.

Shakespeare's plays, some of which were based on him such as MacBeth, were avidly attended by James. He visited Oxford University where he got drunk with undergraduates, and Cambridge University where the reception was cooler. He granted the founding Charter of Edinburgh University in 1582 and considered himself its godfather.

James also started the British Empire by his plantations in Massachusetts, Bermuda, Newfoundland, Guyana, India and the East Indies. He founded the Virginia Company, a plantation of mulberry trees destined to feed silk worms. The worms however never reached Virginia.

Demise

"Look not for the softness of a down pillow in a crown, but remember that it is a thorny piece of stuff and full of continual cares."

The Thirty Years War hit Europe when James was aged 54 and in bad health. James, like his mother before him, suffered from the Stuart disease porphyria. This unpleasant illness which manifested itself by abdominal and rheumatic pain and mental disturbance did not prevent him from being reunited with his native country Scotland in 1617. He depuritanised the Scottish church and by his "Book of Sports"
made it permissible to dance, play and drink church ales.

That same year a Sir Walter Raleigh was let out of prison to search for gold up the Orinoco. The expedition ended in disaster when he clashed with the Spaniards and had to be executed. James was branded a puppet in the hands of the Spanish Ambassador Gondomar. James's pro-catholic policies and Spanish alliance combined with protestant negotiations were severely criticised in England. His belief in
peaceful government was classified as leniency or fear and the East India company brought out James's worst faults: laziness in conducting business, favouritism and incompetence with money.

His son Prince Charles formed a coalition with another of James's handsome young favourites, the Duke of Buckingham, to challenge his father's policies. By 1620 the Great Depression had brought economic collapse and the decline of trade to England. In 1623 James reluctantly consented to Charles and Buckingham to go to Spain to woo the infanta Anna Maria. However the whole expedition failed
miserably. In 1625 James collapsed with porphyria or a stroke which left him speechless. Buckingham was later accused of having poisoned him by treating him with "homeopathic" remedies. He died on 27 March 1625 aged 59. His autopsy revealed sound vitals and a head "full of brains" but his blood was described as wonderfully tainted with melancholy.

His funeral was held at Westminster Abbey, the most glamorous and expensive of its time and later a model for Cromwell's funeral in 1658. The position of his body remained unrecorded until, 250 years later, Dean Stanley instituted a search. James's body was found in the tomb of Henry VII, the first Tudor monarch.

[NI5507] Bruce Craig KITCHEL was born on 21 Apr 1951 in Sheridan, Wyoming. He has record identification
number 4099.(3) Bruce attended schools in Anaconda, Montana. He worked for the Anaconda Copper
Company at their copper smelting facility in Anaconda, Montana for several years and at several local ranches
in Montana. Then he and his wife, Sylvia and children moved to Gillette, Wyoming in 1979 and left there in
1981. While in Gillette, Bruce work in the oil fields driving tanker trucks. Bruce and Sylvia moved to Las
Vegas, Nevada in 1995.

Louise Ann "Weze" PICKET (daughter of Arthur Leslie "Tugger" PICKET and Helen Marie SKOYEN) was
born on 14 Jan 1954 in Anaconda, Montana. (71) She died on 2 Sep 1997 in Anacocnda, Montana. Louise was
raised and educated in Anaconda. Bruce Craig KITCHEL and Louise Ann "Weze" PICKET had the following
children:

+253 i. Joseph KITCHEL.
+254 ii. Barbara KITCHEL.

He was married to Sylvia FLASCHMEYER on 28 Apr 1975 in Anaconda, Montana. Sylvia FLASCHMEYER was
born on 29 Apr 1958 in Anaconda, Montana. She has record identification number 8479.(3) Sylvia attended
schools in Anaconda, Mont. Bruce Craig KITCHEL and Sylvia FLASCHMEYER had the following children:

255 i. Dennis KITCHEL was born on 11 Oct 1977 in Anaconda, Montana. He has record identification
number - nonassigned.(71)
256 ii. Jason KITCHEL was born on 20 Oct 1979 in Gillette, Wyoming. He has record identification
number - nonassigned.

[NI5572] Copied from "History of Green County", page 656
submitted by Jeanne Yoakam

Michael Swigart, farmer, Bellbrook, was born on the place where he now lives (1881), in the year 1827, and is a son of Michael Swigart SR., whose history appears in this work. He was reared on the farm, and received an education in the common schoold, which was obtained at odd times, and was rather meagre. Michael has been thrice married: in 1852, with Elizabeth, daughter of Solomon and Susanna Shanks, who has borne him one child. Mrs. Swigart died in 1853, aged about thirty years. The second marriage was celebrated in March 1855, with Charlotta Swadner, daughter of Henry and Eleanor Swadner, of Montogomery County, Ohio, by whom he had five children, two living (in 1881), Henry and Lincoln; the deceased are Charles, Wilson, and Samuel. (The second) Mrs. Swigart died in 1866, aged about thirty-four. His third and last marriage was celebrated in 1867, with Hannah V. Rike, daughter of William and Elizabeth Patterson, of Xenia, who borne him two children, one living, Oscar, born in Knox County, and an infant. Mr. Swigart has lived on the place where he was born all his life, and owns one hundred and forty-seven acres.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Submitted by Lori Hellmund

The following is about Michael Swigart, husband of Charlotte Swadner. The Swigart's have a road named after them in Montgomery County. I assume it is on the land they once owned.
"Michael Swigart, farmer, Bellbrook, was born on the place where he now lives, in the year 1827 and is a son of Michael Swigart. He was reared on the farm and received his education in the common schools, which was obtained at odd times and was rather meagre. Michael has been thrice married: in 1852 with Elizabeth, daughter of Solomon and Susanna Shanks, who has borne him one child. Mrs. Swigart died in 1853, aged about thirty years. The second marriage was celebrated in March, 1855, with Charlotta Swadner, daughter of Henry and Eleanor Swadner, of Montgomery County, Ohio by whom he had five children, two living, Henry and Lincoln; the deceased are Charles, Wilson, and Samuel. Mrs. Swigart died in 1866 aged about thirty-four. His third and last marriage was celebrated in 1867 with Hannah V. Rike, daughter of William and Elizabeth Patterson, of Xenia, who has borne him two children, one living, Oscar, born in Knox County, and an infant. Mr. Swigart has lived on the place where he was born all his life and owns one hundred acres."

[NI5581] E-mail received from Beth Schlueter - Saturday, November 11, 2006

Marie Antoinette Martin is the Sixth GreatGrandDaughter of Johann Martin Schwedner and has an extensive lineage. Our Prayers go with her.

Hello,

My name is Beth Schlueter and I am the Relief Society President for the Adams Branch where Marie Knott attends. Marie was diagnosed this week with metastatic bone cancer, lung cancer and breast cancer. She is currently in Highland District Hospital in Hillsboro Ohio. She is now being taken care of by Hospice of Hope and we hope to be able to bring her home in a couple of days as she wishes to pass through the veil in her own home if possible. I am moving in with her and the Relief Society sisters here are going to help with her care also. If you would like to contact me my cell phone number is 937-205-1492 or you can E-Mail me at bethschlueter@yahoo.com. I will try to keep you updated on Marie's health. HHer home phone number is 937-393-2452. We are planning on her hospital release on Sunday afternoon. Prayers, Cards, and visits are welcome. Please no fresh cut flowers!

Sincerely,

Beth Schlueter
___________________________________________________________________________________
To all of Marie's Family and Friends,

This morning at 9:29 am Marie passed through the veil. I was with her and so was one of the Priesthood holders from our church. The last four months have been so incredible. How much she taught all of us and the love and example she showed at times were beyond belief. She had been in a semi- coma state for the last three days and her blood pressure bottomed out about 5 am this morning. She was very peaceful and out of pain. She just went to sleep and I know that she is dancing with her beloved Tommy even now as I write this e-mail and she is kissing her children Leah and Duane whom she has been without for so long. Her journey was good, her reward even better I'm sure. Her Visitation is Saturday February 3, 2007 from 9 am to 12 noon at the Turner Funeral Home in Hillsboro, her funeral will follow about 1 pm at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Winchester, Ohio she will be buried at the Ashridge Cemetary where Tommy and the children are buried. Following the burial we will all return to the church for a dinner in her honor and her last request which was to have all of us dance a long slow dance together from one of her songs played by the old Tommy Dorsey band.

Sincerely,

Beth Schlueter

[NI5591] Subitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Per her obit: She united with the Church of the Brethren about twenty-two years ago....(1899). Per letter to her parents of February 21, 1893, they were living in Newton, IA

[NI5595] NOTES: Prince John developed epilepsy when he was young. His condition deteriorated, and by a decision made when he had reached the age of 11, he was removed from home and taken to Wood Farm, Wolferton, near Sandringham, to be looked after exclusively by Mrs. Bill and a man servant. John died in his 14th year.

[NI5596] NOTES: Formerly: Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon; Duchess of York (1923-1936). Queen Consort, 1936-1952;
Queen Mother from 1952. a.k.a.: Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. Now lives at Clarence House, London;
Royal Lodge, Windsor; Birkhall, Balmoral; Castle of Mey, Caithnesshire. Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother
descends from Henry VII, King of England. Elizabeth was the youngest daughter and 9th child. Spent her
childhood at Glamis Castle in Scotland; The precise location of her birth in London is unknown; When she
married in 1923, she became HRH the Duchess of York; Queen Elizabeth (known as the smiling Queen) is
most beloved by all of her countrymen and women. The Queen Mother is 5'2" tall and has blue eyes.

[NI5603] NOTES: Son of George III, Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge.

[NI5609] Ruled from 1689 to 1694.

[NI5623] Submitted by Jeanne Yoakam:

From History of Holmes County, Ohio, page 634.

Frederick Miller (deceased) was one of the prominent citizens of Washington Township. He was born in Bavaria, Germany, April 1, 1821, a son of Frederick and Catharine (Keller) Miller. In 1837 the parents came with their four children to America, and settled in Holmes County, Ohio, buying eighty acres of heavily timbered land land in Washington township, and here spent the rest of their lives. Their children were Margaret, Frederick, Jacob, and Lewis. Margaret being the only one now living.

Frederick Miller, the subject of our notice, lived in Holmes County from his sixteen year; he was educated in the schools of his native country, and after coming to America, acquired a knowledge of the English language. He was intelligent, possessed of good business ability, and became one of the prosperous men of the township. In 1859 he bought 290 acres of land, which he improved and which is now the home of his family. He also owned 80 acres in Ashland County, Ohio. Mr. Miller was married in December, 1849 to Catharine, daughter of Jacob and Barbara (Goodbrick) Swaidner, who were of German ancestry.

To Mr. and Mrs. Miller were born eleven children, viz: Jacob, Lewis, Catharine (Mrs. Moyer), Caroline (Mrs. Kettering), Elizabeth (Mrs. Davis), Frederick, John, Henry (deceased), Matilda, Minnie, and Charles. Mr. Miller was an adherent of the Democratic party. He was a member of the German Evangelical Church, as is also Mrs. Miller. He died in 1880

[NI5632] NOTES: Francis was a mental and physical weakling and was dominated by François, duke of Guise and Cardinal Charles of Lorraine, the uncles of his wife. These two men, who in effect were the rulers during Francis's brief reign (1559-60) tried to repress the growing political power of the Protestants in France. His death ended the ascendancy of the Guises at court. a.k.a.: Francois II.

Francis II, born 19th January 1544, King of France, was the oldest son of Henry II and Catherine de Médicis. Francis married Mary, Queen of Scots on 24th April 1558. After succeeding to the throne in 1559 Francis came under the influence of Mary's powerful Guise relatives who sought to destroy the French Protestants or Huguenots. The ensuing persecution provoked the Huguenot Conspiracy of Amboise (1560), a plot to abduct Francis and arrest his Guise mentors. The plan was discovered and the incipient rebellion bloodily crushed, but Francis's death curtailed Guise influence.

Mary was but a girl of 15 when she married Francis with whom she had been brought up. Francis, a year younger, adored Mary and she bore him a strong sisterly affection. He was a weak and sickly child, and it is unlikely that the marriage was ever consummated. Francis fell ill with an ear infection in November 1560 and was dead by 5th December, just over two and a half years after their union.

[NI5634] NOTES: a.k.a.: Princess Beatrice, Princess Henry of Battenberg; Elizabeth Longford, in "Life of Elizabeth II" shows Beatrice's birthdate as: 1858. Birthdate shown from Debrett's Book of Royal Children, Charles Kidd & Patrick Montague-Smith. Christened: Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore.

[NI5635] Ruled from 1820 to 1830.
NOTES: The eldest son of George III, Geroge IV (as the Prince of Wales) became notorious for his profligacy and extravagance. Despite his father's strongly anti-Catholic views, he secretly married a Roman Catholic, Mrs. Maria Anne Fitzherbert (1756-1837) in 1785. Less than two years later, to obtain money for his debts, he allowed Parliament to declare the marriage illegal, which in fact it was by the terms of acts governing royal marriages and succession. In 1795, again to liquidate his debts, he agreed to a marriage with his cousin, Caroline of Brunswick, but he became estranged from her in 1796 after the birth of their daughter, Princess Charlotte (1796-1817). George became the Prince Regent in 1811, when his father became mentally unable to discharge his duties and succeeded to the throne in 1820.

[NI5637] Ruled from 1660 to 1685.

[NI5638] Ruled from 1837 to 1901.NOTES: Victoria, Queen of England, Empress of India; a.k.a.: Alexandrina Victoria Reign: 20 Jun 1837 - 22 Jan 1901; Crowned: Westminster Abbey 28 Jun 1838; She became queen at age 18. Her 63 year reign was the longest in the history of England. Her descendants, including 40 grandchildren, married into almost every royal family of Europe. With her personal example of honesty, patriotism and devotion to family life, Victoria became a living symbol of the solidity of the British Empire. The many years of her reign, often referred to as the Victorian age, witnessed the rise of middle class and were marked by a deeply conservative morality and
intense nationalism. She was obsessed with the collecting of memorabilia of her family. She mourned her late husband, Albert, for more than 40 years.

[NI5650] Frances Bernice KITCHEL was born on 15 Jun 1938 in Wodland, Calif.. She has record identification
number 2245.

She was married to William Maitland ZINSLEY on 24 Nov 1960. William Maitland ZINSLEY was born on 10
Apr 1934 in Hollywood, California. (72) He has record identification number 2246. (3) Frances Bernice KITCHEL
and William Maitland ZINSLEY had the following children:

259 i. William Ralph ZINSLEY was born on 23 Dec 1964 in Redondo Beach, California. (3) He has
record identification number 2531. (3)
260 ii. Robert Maitland ZINSLEY was born on 6 Oct 1969 in Redondo Beach, California. (3) He has
record identification number 2532. (3)

[NI5657] 22. George4 Parkhurst (John3, Christopher2, George1) was born in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England about 1588.
His body was interred June 18, 1675 in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England.

He married twice. He married Phebe Leete in England, about 1611. Phebe was born in Little Eversden,
Cambridgeshire, England December 20, 1585. Phebe was the daughter of Robert Leete and Alice Grundy.
Phebe died before 1641 in England. She was christened in Little Eversden, Cambridgeshire, England,
December 20, 1585. Phebe (Phebe "Unknown" in some early Parkhurst genealogies) was the youngest of
seven children. She had a sister Ruth, wife of Reverend Timothy Dalton, Rector of Woolverstone, which is five
miles from Ipswich, England. Timothy dalton and Ruth Leete were married 13 June 1615 at Gislingham,
Suffolk. Ruth died in new Hampshire without surviving children and left legacies to six Parkhurst children of her
sister, Phebe, suggesting that Phebe's hildren Samuel, John and Abigail had died young.

He married Susanna Unknown in Watertown, Middlesex County, Mass, about 1644. Susanna was born in
England about 1610. Susanna died about 1690 in London, England. Susanna participated in the Widow Simson
event. Susanna, widow of John Simson, who married George Parkhurst as his second wife, may have been nee
Brown, as she interacts with Browns in Watertown, MA. Susanna returned to England before 1655. Except for
Benjamin Parkhurst, the children Susanna took back to England probably grew up there, and never returned to
New England. George was born during 1588 possibly in May, probably in Ipswich, England. George and his
spouse, Phebe Leete, lived in Ipswich where their nine children were baptized. After the last child was
baptized there is no record of them living in Ipswich suggesting they lived else where before moving to New
England before 1640.

George’s arrival date in New England can be estimated by the marriages contracted by his children in
Massachusetts before 1640. George first appears on record in New England at Watertown, MA in 1642 when it
was ordered that a highway should be laid out to his house. He is not mentioned in the four grants of land
made in Watertown between July 25, 1636 and April 09, 1638. Whether he brought his wife with him is
unknown. If he did she died shortly afterwards, because in 1644 he married his second wife Susanna Simson
the widow of John Simson. John Simson was buried in Watertown on 6/10/1643 leaving two sons and three
daughters.

The period when George and Susanna were married was determined by sales of Simson's real estate. Susanna
held title after John's death and deeded some of the land on November 09, 1643. George sold two acres of
Simson's land on November 16, 1644, having acquired title by his marriage to Susanna. They were living in
Boston, Massachusetts by 1645 as evidenced by a deed George made there on October 04, 1645 in which he
sold six more acres of the Simson land in Watertown.

On June 13, 1655, George sold the last twelve acres of the Simson land for 21 pounds. This conveyance was
made by permission of the General Court granted May 23, 1655. This was done in response to his petition in
which he asserts that he was then "near 67 years old", and that he, his wife and children who were all in
England, were in a destitute condition. He stated that she had had ten children during her twenty years'
residence in America (seven sons and three daughters, five of the sons were Parkhurst). He said that she had
gone to England with six of the children and four remained in America. He stated when she arrived in England
that she found her mother, brothers and sisters were unable to help as she had expected. He was petitioning
the court to let him sell the land in order that he might go to the aid of his wife. George probably returned to
England soon after the selling of the deed on June 13, 1655. This was the last record of George Parkhurst in
New England.

George is probably the "Old George Parkhurst" buried 6/18/1675 at St. Lawrence, Ipswich, England. He may
have been living with his cousin Nathaniel Parkhurst, who had six hearths in the Suffolk Hearth Tax of 1674.

George Parkhurst and Phebe Leete had the following children:

+ 27 i. Phebe5 Parkhurst was born before November 29, 1612.

+ 28 ii. Mary Parkhurst was born August 28, 1614.

+ 29 iii. Deborah Parkhurst was born before August 1, 1619.

+ 30 iv. George Parkhurst was born June 5, 1621.

31 v. John Parkhurst was born in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England before October 19, 1623. John died before
1641 in England. He was christened in St. Margaret's, Ipswich, County Suffolk, England, October 19, 1623.

32 vi. Abigail Parkhurst was born in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England January 1, 1625/26. Abigail died before
1641 in England.

+ 33 vii. Elizabeth Parkhurst was born before May 18, 1628.

+ 34 viii. Joseph Parkhurst was born December 21, 1629.

35 ix. Samuel (Sammewell) Parkhurst was born in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England before February 1616/17.
Samuel died before 1641 in England.

George Parkhurst and Susanna Unknown had the following children:

36 x. Son Parkhurst was born in Boston or Watertown, Suffolk Co., MA about 1645. Son died in London,
England. George Parkhurst's petition for permission to sell land in 1655 stated that Susanna had ten children
while in New England. Of these ten children, five sons were fathered by George. Records have been found for
four of these sons. This son, name unknown, could have been either the first or second born. He was probably
taken back to England by his mother and died somewhere in the greater London area never returning to
America.

+ 37 xi. Benjamin Parkhurst was born about 1647.

38 xii. Daniel Parkhurst was born in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA before June 10, 1649. Daniel died in London,
England.

39 xiii. Joshua Parkhurst was born in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA before March 7, 1652/53. Joshua died in
London, England. Joshua was probably taken back to London by his mother and died in the greater London
area.

40 xiv. Caleb Parkhurst was born in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA before February 1653/54. He married Sarah
Unknown in Cripplegate Co., London, England. Caleb was probably taken back to England by his mother. He
was probably the Caleb Parkhurst with wife, Sarah, of St. Giles, Cripplegate, London whose five children were
baptized there.

[NI5665] Ruled from 1066 to 1087

[NI5673] Note: John's Parents came from Germany and settled in Pennsylvania. They moved from there to Ohio to a farm which remained in the family until 1935. Last known owner wa Uncle John Smith.

[NI5677] Clarence Pearl LAVERTY (21) was born on 20 Aug 1871. He died on 30 Apr 1957 in Laporte, Colo.. He was
buried in Fort Collins, Colorado. He was a Water Superintendent for the D. & R. G. Railroad. He has record
identification number 3616.(3) He has Ancestral File number 16.(4) For most of his adult life Clarence lived at Salida,
Colorado.

He was married to Sabina A. BARTLES (daughter of Rev. J. N. BARTLES and Orril B. BARTLES) on 12 Jun 1910. They
had no children. Sabina A. BARTLES was born on 5 Aug 1869 in Blue Ridge, Illinois. She died in 1954 in Bellvue,
Colorado.

[NI5695] NOTES: Christened: Victoria Alexandra Alice Mary, but always known by her last name, Mary. Mary was to prove the brightest of the family. Her eldest brother once said that it was a pity she would not succeed, for "she was much cleverer than me". In 1932 she was declared Princess Royal. The Princess Royal died suddenly and unexpectedly in the garden of Harewood House, Yorkshire. a.k.a.: Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood.

[NI5696] NOTES: Christened: Albert Arthur Frederick George. Known to the Royal Family as Bertie; Was Prince Albert, Duke of York (1920-1936); Acceded as George VI following his brother's abdication on 11 Dec 1936. The reign of George VI was marked by the relinquishment of the title of Emperor of India, following the partition of India in 1947 into Pakistan and India. George VI had cancer of the lung (one lung had be removed). He died of cancer after a long illness. Bertie had a speech defect which made him stutter and stammer.
___________________________________________________________________________________
GEORGE VI (r. 1936-52)

George VI became King unexpectedly following the abdication of his brother, King Edward VIII, in 1936.

A conscientious and dedicated man, he worked hard to adapt to the role into which he was suddenly thrown. Reserved by nature, and of deep religious belief, he was helped in his work by his wife. He had married Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1923.

King George VI paid State Visits to France in 1938, and to Canada and the United States in 1939 (he was the first British monarch to enter the United States).

His greatest achievements came during the Second World War, when he remained for most of the time at Buckingham Palace (the Palace was bombed nine times during the war). He and his wife, Queen Elizabeth, visited severely bombed areas in the East End of London and elsewhere in the country, gained him great popularity.

The King developed a close working relationship with his wartime Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, as most of Europe fell to Nazi Germany.

Recognising the total nature of modern warfare, in 1940 the King instituted the George Cross and George Medal, to be awarded for acts of bravery by citizens. In 1942, the George Cross was awarded to the island and people of Malta in recognition of the heroism with which they had resisted the enemy siege.

Having served in the Navy during the First World War, including the Battle of Jutland, the King was anxious to visit his troops whenever possible. He went to France in 1939 to inspect the British Expeditionary Force, and to North Africa in 1943 after the victory of El Alamein.

In June 1944, the King visited his Army on the Normandy beaches 10 days after D-Day, and later that year he visited troops in Italy and the Low Countries.

On VE (Victory in Europe) Day, 8 May 1945, Buckingham Palace was a focal point of the celebrations. The war had immeasurably strengthened the link between the King and his people.

In 1947, the King undertook a major tour of South Africa, accompanied by the Queen and their daughters, Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret - the first time a monarch had undertaken a tour with his family.

When India and Pakistan became independent in 1947, George ceased to be Emperor of India. Changes in the Commonwealth meant that its tie was no longer based on common allegiance to the Crown, but upon recognition of the Sovereign as Head of the Commonwealth.

These changes in the Commonwealth relationship and the social reforms of the post-war Labour government occurred against the background of Britain's weak post-war economic position and the beginning of the Cold War, which meant that the privations of war were extended well into the post-war period.

By 1948, it seemed that Britain had overcome the worst hardships of the post-war years, but the strain of the Second World War and the tensions of the post-war period had taken their toll on the King's health. The King failed to recover from a lung operation, and died in his sleep on 6 February 1952 at Sandringham; he was aged 56.

After lying in state at Westminster Hall, the King's funeral was held at St George's Chapel, Windsor, where he lies buried.

At the King's funeral, attached to the Government's wreath was a card on which Churchill had written the phrase inscribed on the Victoria Cross - 'For Valour'.

[NI5700] Death was the results of a traffic accident.

[NI5701] Herbert L. KITCHELL (30) was born on 24 Jul 1883 in Winterset, Iowa. He died in Sep 1978 in Winterset,
Iowa.(25) He has record identification number 1164. (3) He has Ancestral File number 25.(4) He has been engaged in
the farming and dairy business most of his life. Herbert and Mary have no children and are retired and live in
Winterset, Iowa

He was married to Mary MCDONALD (daughter of S.S. MCDONALD and Barbara E. MCDONALD) on 26 Apr 1905.
Mary MCDONALD has record identification number 1165. (3)

[NI5710] Ruled from 1327 to 1377

[NI5718] BELLINGHAM - Lifetime Raymond resident Charles Richard Church, 78, died Friday,
July 30, 1999, at the St. Joseph Hospital at Bellingham from injuries received
Thursday in a motorcycle accident.

[NI5719] Military service:
Active Duty:U.S. Navy (Reserve) Supply Corps
April 1966 - August 1969
Rank: LTJG
Service: Vietnam - Inspector of material, petrolmn
Defense Fuel Supply Cas.
Springfield, VA
Operations Officer, Distribution and Traffic
Aide to Commanding Officer
Retired from Reserves (1979) as LCDR

[NI5754] Note: Harold is a retired ordained Lutheran Minister.

[NI5756] Notes for ROSELLA GERTRUDE KEYSOR:
Last Rites Held For Mrs. Connell
Funeral services for Mrs. Rose Connell, 86, were held last Thursday afternoon at tow o'clock at the Curch of the Brethren in charge of the Rev. Earl Deardorff, pastor, assisted by S.J. Epler, minister of the Madison Church of Christ. Mrs. Ed Bartachek, at the piano, accompanied Mrs. O. O. Montgomery and Mrs. Don Anthony singing two selections. Interment was in I.O.O.F. cemetery with Fred Willet, Frank Swatosh, Henry Manatt, Gerald Manatt, Cechil Brannian and Ray Robey serving as pallbearers.

Native of Brooklyn

The daughter of George and Tamar Keysor, Rosella Gertrude Keysor was born August 17, 1868 in Poweshiek county, Brooklyn, Iowa and died Dec. 21, 1954 in a Grinnell hospital where she had been a patient for several weeks.

She was married Dec. 20, 1888 to Lloyd Connell who preceded her in death Nov. 28, 1935. Four children were born to the couple; Glen Connell and Mrs. Harvey (Ina) Jones of Brooklyn; Mrs. W. J. (Gertrude) Siemans of Seattle, Wash. and a son, Harold, who died July 8, 1922.
After graduating from Brooklyn High School she taught in public schools for a year and took part in many community debating teams. Mrs. Connell was active in the Brethren church until her illness in July.

Survivors include her three children' one sister, Mrs. George Lyman of Brooklyn; seven grandchildren and ten great grandchildren.
Brooklyn Chornicle

[NI5764] Copied from "The Chronicle" Centralia/Chehalis, Washington, Friday, January 31, 2003

Headlines, Front page read:

Four Die in two Lewis County Collisions: by Sharyn L. Decker, a reporter for The Chronicle.

A 44-year-old man was killed when his vehicle hit two big trucks along Highway 12 near Ethel on Thursday morning, and hours later three Centralia men died after a car with five occupants ran off the road near Vader and stuck some trees.

Christopher D. Thompson of Raymond died instantly after the 10:00 AM collision near Ethel, according to the Washington State Patrol. The two truck drivers were uninjured.............

....Earlier in the day, state Department of Transportation workers, troopers and rescuers were involved in the fatality collision between a pickup truck and two big rigs.

Thompson's 1990 Toyota pickup was eastbound on Highway 12 when it crossed the center line and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer combination behind the cab, according to the Patrol. The pickup spun, hit the larger truck's rear wheels, and then slid sideways into an oncoming log truck.

Trooper J.E. Matagi investigated the crash and reported Thompson died of massive trauma. His truck was destroyed.

Matagi reported that the driver of the 2000 Kenworth truck and trailer, Billie Morgan, 52, is from Roseburg, Oregon.

The driver of the empty log truck, Frank J. Vanderhulen, 45, is a Randle resident, according to the trooper. His truck sustained about $5,000.00 in damage.

Matagi estimated about $10,000.00 in damage was done to the tractor-trailier combination. All three were wearing seat belts, he reported.

Trooper Gavin March reported there is no indication that alcohol was involved.

Autopsies are scheduled for today for both deceased drivers, according to Terry Wilson, Lewis County corconer.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Copied from the Aberdeen Daily World, February 4, 2003

Christopher D. Thompson - January 30, 2003


ETHEL - Christopher Dale Thompson, 44, of Raymond died Thursday, Jan. 30, 2003, in an automobile accident near Ethel.

Mr. Thompson was born June 3, 1958, at Chehalis to Lloyd and Marlene (Wisner) Thompson. He graduated from Adna High School in 1977 and was also a graduate of Clover Park Technical College at Tacoma.

On June 12, 1982, he married Katherine Jackson in Chehalis. She survives him at the family home.

Mr. Thompson had worked as an auto body technician in Tacoma, Puyallup and Chehalis. He was currently employed by Bob Lund Realty of Chehalis.

He always enjoyed working with young people. He had been a Cub Scout master and assistant master for Pack 968 and Troop 36 of Raymond.

He had also coached basketball for two years and had served as a referee for youth and high school basketball and football through the Lewis County Referee Association.

An avid fisherman, Mr. Thompson also enjoyed camping, hunting and practical jokes.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by his mother and stepfather, Fred and Marlene Pontius of St. Helens, Ore.; two sons, Travis of Centralia and Curtis of Raymond; a daughter, Kristina of the family home; three brothers, Larry of Chehalis, David of Kalama and Mike of Rainier, Ore.; a sister, Catherine of Olympia, and his grandmother, Annabelle Carney of Centralia.

His father died in 1978. His grandparents, Elwin and Agnes Wisner, also died previously.

A memorial service is scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Adna Middle/High School in Adna.

Arrangements are by the Sticklin Funeral Chapel of Centralia.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
As Reported in the Willapa Harbor Herald, Vol 22, Issue 06, Wednesday, February 5, 2003

Front Page Headline Heads:

Raymond man killed in wreck
By Jean todd

Raymond resident, Christopher D. Thompson, 44, was killed in a three vehicle collision Thursday morning (January 30, 2003).

Thompson was heading westbound on State Route 12 a milepost 73.75 near Ethel when his vehicle crossed the center line, striking a 2000 Kenworth truck and trailer behind the cab portion of the truck, according to police reports. The truck was driven by Billie R. Morgan, 52, of Roseburg, OR. Thompson's 1990 Toyota pickup proceeded to spin-colliding with the rear wheels of the same truck.

Thompson's vehicle then apparently slid sideways in the eastbound lane and collided with a 1980 Kenworth log truck driven by Frank J. Vanderhulen, 45, of Randle. Thompson's pickup came to a rest on the eastbound shoulder of SR12.

Thompson wa pronounced dead at the scene by Lewis County Corners Office due to massive trauma. Neither of the other two drivers were injured as a result of the accident. The cause of the collision is still under investigation.

Thompson leaves behind his wife Katherine, daughter Kristina, and sons Travis and Curits, wo all live at the family home in Raymond.

Thompson was active with the local youth, working as Club Scout Master and Assistant Scount Master for Pack 968 and Troop 36 of Raymond.

A memorial service for Thompson is scheduled for Saturday, February 8 at Adna High School beginning at 11:00 AM. Pastor Joel Estruth will officiate. Donations may be made to the Christopher thompson Memorial Fund at any area branch of Wells Fargo Bank.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
As reported in the Willapa Harbor Herald, Vol 22, Issue 06, Wednesday, February 5, 2003, page 5.

Obituaries:

Christopher Dale Thompson

Christopher Dale Thompson, 44, died Thursday, January 30, 2003, near Ethel, Washington, in an automobile accident. He was born June 3, 1958, to Lloyd and Marlene (Wisner) Thompson in Chehalis, Washington. He had attended schools in Adna, Washington and graduated from Adna High School in 1977. He also was a graduate of Clover Park Technical College in Tacoma.

On June 12, 1982, he married Katherine Jackson in Chehalis, Washington.

He had been employed as an auto body technician in Tacoma, Puyallup, and Chehalis. He was currently employed by Bod Lund Reality in Chehalis.

Thompson always enjoyed woking with youth. He had been a Cub Scount Master and assistant Scout Master for Pack 968 and Troop 36 of Raymond, Washington. He coached Son League basketball for two years and had served as a referee for youth and high school basketball and football through the Lewis County Referee Association.

He was an avid fisherman and loved camping and hunting and practical jokes. Above all, his family was most important to him.

He is survivied by his wife Katherine at home in Raymond; mother Marlene and stepfather Fred Pontius of St. Helens, Oregon, sons Travis Thompson and Curits Thompson of Raymond; daughter Kristina Thompson at home in Raymond; brothers Larry of Chehalis, David of Kalama, and Mike Thompson of Ranier, Oregon; sister Catherine Thompson of Olympia, Washington; and a grandmother Annabelle Carney of Centralia, Washington.

He was preceeded in death by his father Lloyd Thompson in 1978, and grandparents Elwin and Agnes Wisner.

Memorials may be donated to Christopher Thompson memorial fund at any branch Wells Fargo Bank.

A Memorial Service for Christopher Thompson is scheduled to begin at 11:00 AM, Saturday, February 8, 2003, at the Adna Middle/High School in Adna, Washington with Dr. Joel Estruth officiating.

Arrangements are under the direction of Sticklin Funeral Chapel, Centralia.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The Chronicle, Centralia, WA

Wednesday, February 05, 2003

Christopher Dale Thompson

Christopher Dale Thompson, 44, of Raymond, formerly of Adna, WA, passed away Thursday, Jan. 30, 2003 in a fatal accident. He was born in Chehalis, WA June 3, 1958 to Lloyd and Marlene Thompson.

Married to Kathy Lee in June 1982. They have 2 sons and a daughter. He graduated from Adna High School and Cloverpark Votec School in Tacoma. He worked in various Auto Body Shops in Tacoma, the Puyallup area and Che-halis. Bob Lund's Century 21 in Chehalis currently employed Chris. He has been in the Boy Scouts program for 10 years in Pacific County as Scout Leader and Master, 4 years as a referee for basketball and football in Lewis County, and coached Son League. Hobbies were fishing, hunting, and the great outdoors. Preceded in death by his father, Lloyd Thompson and grandparents Agnes and Elwin Wisner.

Survived by wife Kathy Lee, daughter Kristina of Raymond, and 2 sons, Travis (Centralia) and Curtis (South Bend), brothers, Larry, David and Mike; sister Cathy, mother Marlene Pontius and grandmother Annabelle Carney.

Memorial/Potluck will be held at the Adna High School on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2003 at 11 A.M. A Chris Thompson memorial fund has been set up at Wells Fargo Bank.

[NI5771] Served in U.S. Army as enlisted, 79th Division, Artillery Observer, World War II, European Theater.
No Children.

[NI5775] E-mail message received by Dan Yoakam (Ohio) from Lucy Funk:

Dan, I was in Ohio doing some research and when I opened a page in one of their books, the following was on the page. Sorry, but the individual who did the scrapbook, did not put the source and date. Oh, well, we all did that when we first began.

John Swaidner

The subject of this sketch was the son and eldest child of Jacob and Barbara Swaidner. He was born in Columbiana County, January 13, 1827, and died in Hicksville, February 11, 1908, aged 81 years and nearly 1 month.

During his boyhood his parents moved to Ashland County, where on January 20, 1848, he was married to Elizabeth Roby (Raby). To this union was born five children, three of whom survive: Sylvester Swaidner of Springfield, Ohio and Nelson and Lorenzo Swaidner of Scipio. On May 20, 1863 his wife died and Brother Swaidner was married again, this time to Miss Anna Files, March 27, 1864, who surivies her husband. To this union was born four children, three of whom survive him: Mrs. Nettie V. Brace, of Scipio, Miss Edith Swaidner of Hicksville, and Arthur Swaidner of Pittsburg, PA.

Brother Swaidner was one of nine children, five of whom survive him; Jacob Swaidner of Fort Wayne, Mary A. Scholes of St. Joe, Bar. Barbara Collier of Tenn. Matilda Gunn of Washington and Luchinda Braybrook of Scipio. Besides all these, our brother leaves nine grand children who also sorrow much that he is gone.

In the early part of the 50's (1850's) Brother Swaidner moved to Allen County, Indiana, which with the exception of seven years residence in Hicksville, was his home ever since.

He was brought in in the Lutheran faith, but not long after his removal to Allen County he was conerted and united with the Methodist Protestant church of which he was a member at thetime of his death. His membership was with the N.E. Springfield M.P. church, he being that last of its charter members. He was a very faithful member and an earnest steadfast, consistent christian. He was of the sturdy pioneer stock, a man of toil, honesty, kindness and piety. He was a man of prayer and the song of angels sang on Bethlehem's plain was the spirit of his life. His sickness was of brief duration. At first it seemed of little conswquence, but later became more serious. An unusual spirit of prayer for his community and friends was upon him even while sick. He descended to the stream we call "death" in the full possession of his facilities. He assured all that it was well with him, that his hope was bright and at 5 o'clock Tuesday morning John Swaidner answered the roll call of his Gos and entered into his rest, while the mourners go about the streets and his children rise up and call him "Blessed".

The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Helms in the Methodist church Friday afternoon, February 14, and the body was laid to rest in the Scipio cemetery. The family and relative have the sympathy of a host of friends.

Handwritten note states wife died March 1930.

Since it mentions Hickville, which is in Defiance County, there may be records there.

My suggestion would be to try Bryon, Ohio (I believe it is in williams County) as it has the best genealogy information. Defiance, has some but the people in Bryon are very good and helpful. I believe the Library there has e-mail. Others, that I have refered to that Library have been well please.

Eliza (Luzy)

[NI5777] In our ongoing effort to overpopulate the earth, we are extremely happy to announce the birth of our 14th CHILD on the 14th DAY of the year 2 0 0 0. Faith Shirley Hawkins, January 14, 2000, 2:10pm 11 pounds, 8 ounces, 23 inches long. "For every good thing bestowed and every perfect gift is from above..." James 1:17 NASB

Special thanks for all the prayers on our behalf. Faith Shirley was delivered at home by Wayne, with Elizabeth and Susanna (our oldest daughters) in attendance. It was a very special birthing experience.

"For Thou didst form my inward parts;
Thou didst weave me in my mother's womb.
I will give thanks to Thee, for I am
fearfully and wonderfully made...

And in Thy book they were all written,
The days that were ordained for me,
When as yet there was not one of them." Psalms 139:13,14,16 NASB

[NI5779] Submitted by Jeanne Yoakam

Obituary

Catharine Swaidner Miller was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, November 2, 1828. She moved with her parents to Loudonville when nine years of age and settled on a farm a few miles south of town. In her early youth she was confirmed in the faith of the Trinity Evangelical Church and remained faithful and consistent member to the end of her life. She was married to Frederick Miller, November 10, 1849. This unio was blessed with 11 children all of whom survive her except two. She died Wednesday, August 17, 1904, at the exact hour on the 24th anniversary of her husband's death, aged 75 years, 9 months and 15 days. She leaves to mourn, nine children, thirteen grand-children, and one great-grandchild. In her christian life she was a bright light and shinning example. She has a warm heart for her savior and his kingdom and took an active part in church work.

Obituary

Mrs. Fred Miller Dead

Mrs. Fred Miller, an aged and higly respected widow lady, died at her home about three miles south of town, on Wednesday night. Although Mrs. Miller had been in poor health for some time she was able to be around and out and on last Saturday made our office a pleasant social call while in town doing some stopping. Her sudden death was due to a stroke of apoplexy. The funeral cortege will leave the house at 10 o'clock on Saturday morning and proceed to the Trinity Lutheran church in this place where services will be conducted by Rev. Theodore Jud. Interment in the Ulloman cemetery, east of town.

[NI5803] Biography of Philip D. Ginder, page 986. History of De Kalb County, Indiana. Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, 1885.

Philip D. Ginder, farmer and stock-raiser, section 27, Wilmington Township, was born in Ashland County, Ohio, March 7, 1846, a son of Jacob Ginder, who settled on section 27 in 1854, and now lives across the street from his
first settlement, on section 22. He was reared a farmer and has always followed that vocation. He lives on apart of the land entered by his father, and in connection with his own cultivates his father’s farm. He owns forty acres of valuable land. His residence is a fine two-story brick, the main part 18x28 feet, with a one-story L 24x26 feet. He has the finest barn in the township. It is 36x62 feet in size, and eighteen feet high. Mr. Ginder was married in January, 1871, to Sarah C. Swaidner, daughter of John Swaidner, of Hicksville, Ohio. To them were born two children; but one, Mary A., is living. Sarah is deceased. Mrs. Ginder died Sept. 4, 1873, and April 16, 1874, Mr. Ginder married Martha McDannell, daughter of David McDannell. To them have been born five children, but three of whom are living---Jacob L., Inez B. and Zantha A. Ida and an infant daughter are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Ginder are member of the United Brethren church.

Submitted by:
Arlene Goodwin
Auburn, Indiana
Agoodwin@ctlnet.comm

[NI5808] Maria Margaret Swaidner born 1842 Ohio. Died 1922. Buried North Georgetown Cemetery, Columbiana Co. OH Row 10 She married S. Zelotus Whiteleather in Columbiana Co. OH Dec. 14, 1867. He was born Aug. 4, 1842 Columbiana Co. OH, the son of Johan George Whiteleather and Elizabeth Zimmerman. He died Dec. 13, 1881 Knox Twp. Columbiana Co. OH . Buried North Georgetown Cemetery, Columbiana Co. OH 10th row. He served in Co. D. 115th OH Volunteers. Maria remarried to a Galbreath.

[NI5833] The Creager history

Compiled by Irene Creager Lawson

Edited George Edward Creager

Austin, Texas January 1, 1985

Emanuel Creager son of Christian Creager

Born-July 1, 1811 Frederick County, Maryland
Died January 14, 1891 Montgomery County, Ohio
Buried -- David's Cemetery
Married -- August 31, 1837 Montgomery County, Ohio by Rev. David Winters [sources: record of marriages, volume B., page 166, in the office of the probate judge, Montgomery County, Ohio]
Wife -- Mary Jane Swadener
Born -- March 31, 1819.
Died -- March 21, 1876
Buried -- David's Cemetery, VanBuren Township, in her family's plot.
Parents -- Eleanor Suman and Henry Swadener
Children:Born:
1. Lavina CreagerJuly 27, 1838
2. John T. CreagerMay 25, 1841
3. Simon CreagerJanuary 15, 1843
4. William Henry CreagerMarch 28, 1844
5. Nelson CreagerOct. 16, 1845
6. Charles Madison CreagerSept. 14, 1847
7. Sarah Ellen CreagerApril 10, 1849
8. George CreagerApril 20, 1851
9. Wesley CreagerAugust 9, 1854
10. Elizabeth CreagerMarch 10, 1856
11. Rosetta CreagerAugust 19, 1858

Biography

Emanuel Creager, third born to Christian and Mary Creager, was born in Frederick County, Maryland on July 1, 1811. He was baptized at the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Woodsboro, Maryland, with Jacob Rike has sponsored [date not given]. His parents made the long trip to Ohio with three brothers, Michael, John C. and Henry and his only sister, Charlotte, grew up on the farm in the "Creager neighborhood" about six miles from Dayton. He attended the first two-story log church. In many book No. 1, 15 September 1826 -- 27 Sept. 1874, of David's reformed Church is a list of donations for the first church. Among the names is "Emanuel Creager donated $1.00."

In 1821, Emanuel's parents sold 52 acres of land to Jacob and Sarah Swadener and threw them he met his future wife, Mary Jane Swadener. Emanuel's father died April 8, 1836 the year before Emanuel and Mary Jane were married. They were married August 31, 1837. An account of Christian's public sale list Emanuel as buying more than 40 of the farming and household items.

Mary Jane's parents, Henry and Eleanor [Suman] Swadener, or both born in Frederick County, Maryland, he, Nov. 26, 1791, and she July 11th, 1798. They had nine children which Mary Jane was their first born. There are other children's names and birth dates [taken from the Swadener family Bible] were: Daniel -- 22 July, 1820; Samuel -- Oct. 23rd, 1823; Sarah and -- Sept. 4, 1823; Elizabeth -- February 21, 1825; Clarinda -- June 7, 1827; Levina -- June 23, 1835. In Mary Jane's father, Henry, died Dec. 31860 and her mother, Eleanor, September 18, 1868 both in Montgomery County, Ohio. Henry Swadener's estate packet No. 3205 can be found in the probate court of Montgomery County, Ohio. It was probated January 3rd, 1861 by Henry Routzong, Uriah Shank and Samuel Swadener. The widow took the family Bible, one bureau, one bedstead and one bidding and $200. No tears were listed. [The old Swadener family Bible is in the possession of Della Caden, who lives in Florida. Information from the Bible was furnished by a Leona Keplinger Unger of the West Alexandria, Ohio.] Eleanor's parents, Mary Jane's paternal grandparents, or Jacob and Mary Suman. They were buried in Creager Cemetery [markers now in David's Cemetery]. Jacob Suman was born Feb. 7, 1826 and died 1877 and Mary Suman was born in 1826. Emanuel L. and Mary Jane Creager, along with several dissuade her family, became members of the David's reform church on May 19th, 1844.

The 1840 census this list Emanuel and Mary Jane living in Washington Township, Montgomery County with two children. Emanuel L. and Mary Jane then purchased 81 acres of land and Darke County, Adams Township. The "Atlas of Darke County -- 1857" shows E. Creager's farm just north of New Harrison, Ohio, between Greenville and Bradford. Other Creager's living in that area at the time or his brother Michael and two cousins, Thomas Creager and Solomon Creager. The 1850 census list Emanuel and Mary Jane and seven children living on their Darke County farm. By the 1860 census, it was them with 11 children from 22 to 2 years of age on their Darke County farm in Adams Township.

Emanuel and Mary Jane left Darke County in the late 1860s after the death of their two teenage children. They were reinstated in David's church May 15, 1867 they were dismissed by letter to Slifers Reformed [now Presbyterian] with church near Farmersville, Ohio, along with their two daughters, Elizabethan Rosetta. They were members until Mary Jane's death in 1876. After Mary Jane's death, Emanuel broke up his home and went to live with his children. In the 1870 census, he was living in Montgomery County, Miami Township. In the Preble County directory of 1875, West Alexandria, or the names listed of the Emanuel Creager and his son Charles Creager. In the 1880 census, Emanuel and a son Wesley, and a daughter Elizabeth, or living with their son Charles and his wife, Hannah, and two daughters, Della and Bertha, at their home one-quarter mile north of West Alexandria. Charles died on February 16, 1888 and his public sale was March 13, 1888. Emanuel then went to live in Liberty, Ohio, hurried died on Jan. 14, 1891. Emanuel, Mary Jane and their two teenage children are buried under a huge tree in David's Cemetery alongside Mary Jane's parents, Henry and Eleanor Swadener.
____________________________________________________________________________________
EMANUEL4 CREAGER, s/o Christian Creager and Anna Mary Wolf, was born 1 July 1811 in Frederick County, Maryland. He was the third son of his parents, and he was baptized at the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Woodsboro, Maryland with Jacob Rike as his sponsor. Baby Emanuel accompanied his parents in their long trek to Ohio. Emanuel grew to adulthood in the "Creager Neighborhood" with his four siblings (Michael, John C., Henry, & Charlotte) on the family farm in Van Buren Township in Montgomery County about six miles from Dayton, Ohio.

The parents and their family attended David's Reformed Church, which the family helped to establish, build, and support. In the David's Reformed Church Minute Book #1, 15 Sept. 1826 to 27 Sept. 1874, appears this entry, "Emanuel Creager donated $1.00."

Christian and Anna Mary sold 52 acres of land to Jacob and Sarah Swadener, "and through them he met his future wife, Mary Jane Swadener." (Lawson, p. 48) Christian died 8 April 1836, and Emanuel purchased over forty items from the estate sale. (Lawson's The Creager History)

A year later, Emanuel, married 31 August 1837 in Montgomery County, Ohio to Mary Jane Swadener, daughter of Henry Swadener and Elenor Suman. The young couple were married by the Rev. David Winters. (Marriage Record: Montgomery Co., OH Marriages: Vol. B., p. 166) Mary Jane was born 31 March 1819.
___________________________________________________________________________________
At the time of the 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Emanuel and Mary Jane were living in Washington Township, Montgomery County, Ohio with their daughter, Lavina.

1840 U. S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Ohio
Washington Twp.
Emanuel Criger(sic)
Males:
1-20 under 30 [Emanuel]
Females:
1- under 5 [Lavina]
1-20 under 30 [Mary Jane]
(Internet, Heritage Quest: Series: M704 Roll: 414 Page: 275 Image: 21)

"Emanuel and Mary Jane Creager, along with several of the Swadener family, became members of the David's Reformed Church on May 19, 1844."
(Lawson, p. 50)

It appears that three more children were born to Emanuel and Mary Jane in Montgomery County, Ohio, namely; John T. b 1842, Simon b 1843, and William Henry b 1844.

Emanuel and Mary Jane had purchased eighty-one acres of land within Darke County, Ohio. By the time their fifth child, Nelson, was born Emanuel and his family had relocated to Adams Township, Darke County, Ohio. They had joined Emanuel's brother, Michael, who lived next door, and his two cousins, Thomas and Solomon Creager. And, before the 1850 Census, two more children (Charles and Sarah) joined the family.


1850 U. S. Federal Census
Darke County, Ohio
Adams Twp.
5 November 1850
(Ancestry.com: Image 19 of 34)

#148-148 Emanuel Creeger (sic), 40, male, farmer, Real Estate $1260, b MD
Mary Jane Creeger (sic), 31, female, b OH
Lavina Creeger (sic), 12, female, b OH
John Creeger (sic), 9, female, b OH
Simon Creeger (sic), 7, male, b OH
Wm. H. Creeger (sic), 6, male, b OH
Nelson Creeger (sic), 5, male, b OH
Charles M. Creeger (sic), 3, male, b OH
Sarah E. Creeger (sic), 1, female, b OH




[NI5844] NOTES: a.k.a.: Princess Elizabeth of York (as a child); Heir Presumptive; Full name: Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; Family called her, "Lillibet". Title: Elizabeth II Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Elizabeth was born by Caesarean section at 2:40 am. Coronation Date: 2 June 1953 at Westminster Abbey; Acceded 6 Feb 1952. Residences: Buckingham Palace, London, SW1; Windsor Castle, Berkshire; Sandringham House, Norfolk; Balmoral Castle, Aberdeenshire. Her royal birth was witnessed by a member of Parliament (a practice that was eliminated after the birth of her sister, Margaret). She is addressed as "Your Majesty" by everyone outside of the immediate family. Elizabeth II is 5'4" tall and has blue eyes.

[NI5850] NOTES: HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh; Consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Philip spent his childhood inEngland at the home of his uncle, Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, and began a navalcareer in 1939, when he entered the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth. He served in both the Mediterranean and Pacific theaters during World War II and married the then Princess Elizabeth in 1947, at which time he was named Duke of Edinburgh.

In 1957 he was created Prince of the United Kingdom. Prince Philip, and active advocate of sports, science and education has made many goodwill trips throughout the world, both as representative of and in company with Queen Elizabeth. Before his marriage he was simply: Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten. He was naturalized as a British citizen in 1947. His title: Baron of Greenwich, Earl of Merioneth and Duke of Edinburgh; Granted the style and titular dignity of a Prince of the United Kingdom on 22 Feb 1957.

He was born as: HRH Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark. There was not actual divorce between Prince Philip's parents, but they separated while Philip was still a small boy. His father took off to indulge himself in the fleshpots of Monte Carlo while his mother lived in turn with her four daughters, all of whom had married German Princelings. Philip was taken care of by his Mountbatten relatives in England, who also paid for his schooling.

As a result of the family split, World War II found Philip serving in the British Navy while his
brothers-in-law were fighting on the side of Germany. Philip was a baby of only eighteen months, fifth in line of succession to the Greek throne, when his family had to flee into exile. The was 1922 and Greece was under the heels of a revolutionary junta. Philip's father, Prince Andrew, was arrested and tossed into jail.

Others who opposed the new regime had already been summarily executed and Andrew seemed assured of the same fate. Philip's mother left the family's island home on Corfu and journeyed to Athens in an attempt to save her husband. She appealed for help to her cousin, England's King George V. He dispatched a British secret-service agent, Commander Gerald Talbot, to Athens with instructions to negotiate Prince Andrew's release or, if that failed, to rescue him from prison.

After much ado, the family was finally saved. Prince Philip was born Philippos Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderbert-Glucksburn, Prince of Greece. Philippos became Philip during schooldays in England. He took the name, Mountbatten when he relinquished his Greek Title to take British citizenship prior to marrying Elizabeth.

His own choice of name was actually Philip Oldcastle, but he was finally prevailed upon to take the Mountbatten surname of his mother's family. Elizabeth calls him, "Darling" in private and he is "Papa" to his sons and daughter. His aides address him as "Sir". To everyone else, he is or should be, "Your Royal Highness" the first time he is addressed and "Sir" thereafter. Occupation listed on his passport is given as: Prince of the Royal Household. Philip is 5'11 1/2" (nearly 6ft.) tall.

[NI5852] Ruled from 1727 to 1760.NOTES: Some sources give Nov. 10, 1683 as his birthdate. Like his father, George II was more interested in Hanover than in Great Britain, and during his many absences from London, Caroline frequently acted as regent.

[NI5853] NOTES: Mary's cousin, the Catholic Scottish nobleman Henry Stewart, Laird Darnley, was married with Roman Catholic rites. Mary had given him the title of King, but he now demanded that the crown be secured to him for life and that, if the queen died without children, it should descend to his heirs. Darnley was discovered strangled close by the scene of an explosion of the house where he lay sick. The explosion was by gunpowder, and Mary (it is suspected) was not wholly ignorant of the plot against Darnley.

Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, born 7th December 1545 at Temple Newsham in Yorkshire, was the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots. The second son of Matthew, 4th Earl of Lennox and Lady Margaret Douglas, who was the daughter of Margaret Tudor (sister of Henry VIII) with her second husband, Archibald, 6th Earl of Angus. Darnley's father had originally hoped to marry Mary of Guise (Mary, Queen of Scots' mother) whom he had been sent by the French king to help against the English, but had subsequently changed his loyalties when the marriage was not forthcoming, and sworn allegiance to Henry VIII in exchange for his niece's hand. Darnley's mother had been the pawn in the bitter dispute between her own mother and father, and the victim of her paranoid uncle Henry. She had been a model of diplomacy at the English court where her mother had left her, juggling the favours of Henry's successive wives, while keeping her own head on her shoulders. After having been imprisoned for falling in love without her uncle's permission and seeing her lover die in jail, she was unexpectedly restored to Henry's good books and allowed to marry a man who, though not her soul mate, was nevertheless handsome and promising enough. Their first child, also named Henry Stuart, died shortly after birth and in their second child, both parents poured all their dreams and ambitions. Darnley's father aspired to the Crown of Scotland, as he was descended from James II through the marriage of his grand-father (Matthew Stewart, the 2nd Earl of Lennox) to James's grand-daughter, Elizabeth, a claim which his rival, James Hamilton 2nd Earl of Arran, would contradict time and time again, as his father (James Hamilton 1st Earl of Arran) was Elizabeth's brother. Darnley's mother, besides being Henry VIII's niece, was also half-sister to James V of Scotland through her mother's first marriage to James IV. Imprisoned by her uncle, then promised the Crown of England for her heir, a promise promptly broken by Henry's will, Margaret's hopes soared again when Mary Tudor, her lifelong friend, took over after the death of Henry's son, Edward VI. Mary I however, while showing great generosity to Darnley and his parents, wanted her own heir to inherit the English Crown. As Mary I died childless, Darnley's parents once more coveted a royal future for their son, wishing either the death of Mary's half-sister Elizabeth Tudor, or that of Mary, Queen of Scots' French husband, Francis II over the water. As it happened, it was the latter plan which came to fruition.

Darnley met Mary twice before becoming her suitor. He was sent clandestinely to France by his parents in 1559 after the death of Mary's father-in-law, Henry II. He spent some time at Chambord where the French court was at that moment, under the protective wing of his paternal uncle John Stuart d'Aubigny, who had remained in France. Darnley was not yet thirteen and carried with him a letter from his father,
in which he pleaded to have his forfeited Scottish estates restored. This was nothing but a formal audience with Mary, but a subtle way of introducing young Darnley on the scene. In 1560, when Francis II died in his turn leaving Mary a widow, Darnley was once more sent over to offer his parents' condolences. There is no evidence that Mary regarded Darnley as a suitable choice for a new husband at that point, and her attentions were directed towards Don Carlos of Spain. Meanwhile, Elizabeth I who had always regarded the Lennoxes with extreme suspicion, found out that they had been sending their son abroad behind her back and had them arrested. Darnley though, managed to slip away to France where he stayed for about a year. However, the tide soon turned again in the Lennoxes' favour. Elizabeth who had almost died of smallpox was faced with the thorny issue of her succession and preferred the claim of the Lennoxes for their son, rather than that of the Suffolk line, the spectre of the Grey family (grand-daughter of Elizabeth's aunt, Mary, the other sister of Henry VIII). Margaret and
Matthew were released and Darnley returned to England in 1563, while Lennox was allowed to travel to Scotland to obtain the restitution of his estates.

Elizabeth's attitude towards Mary's marriage negotiations was ambiguous to the extreme. First she made it plain that she would consider her an enemy of England, should she marry into a foreign power such as Spain. Then, she put forward her favourite Robert Dudley, a man lacking in royal blood, related to convicted criminals, suspected of his wife's death and rumoured to be Elizabeth's lover. It is clear that
she never expected Mary to accept her choice of husband for her, and negotiations were brought to an end when Elizabeth refused to name Mary as her successor in exchange. However, at the same time, she allowed Darnley to join his father in Scotland for "legal matters". On 17th February 1565, Darnley arrived at Wemyss Castle in Fife, where he met up with Mary for the third time.

Did Mary fall in love with Darnley or was it just a political match which backfired? The question has been much debated in favour of one or the other theory, and here again, the truth probably lies somewhere in between. As a matter of fact, Darnley and Mary had an awful lot in common. Not only were they both considered extremely attractive people, young and unusually tall for the era (both were over 6 feet tall), but they had received the same education and shared the same taste in many areas. Darnley was an accomplished dancer and sportsman, could play the lute, converse with Mary in her native Scot as well as in her preferred French, understand Latin and write verses. His ambitious parents had taken care to provide him with an education fit for a king in the making. Furthermore, Darnley and Mary both shared a claim to the English throne as well as a common Scottish ancestor. Throughout their childhood and adolescence they had been both doted on, pampered and praised, one leading a sheltered existence at the French court and the other at his parents' home in Yorkshire. The only romantic attachment Mary had known so far was with a sickly immature boy of 15 for whom she had had no more than sisterly affection. His untimely death had robbed them of the possibility of turning this relationship into a marital one, and since then, Mary had only considered marriage in the context of a political exercise. What must this 24 year old full of life and health have thought when she found herself suddenly wooed by this good-looking, cultured peer who benefited from being an English subject and having strong royal connections of his own? Undeniably, she must have welcomed the opportunity of solving the problem of her marital status by marrying a man she felt attracted to, a rare thing for a Queen in those days.

At first Mary did seem to take offence to Darnley's early proposal of marriage, but soon after Elizabeth's refusal to pronounce herself on her succession until she had made up her mind about getting married herself, there was no stopping Mary from wedding Darnley. She wrote impulsive letters in which she asked for Elizabeth's permission to marry Darnley, and then subsequently told her that she would marry
him with or without her consent. This latter letter was intercepted by Mary's Secretary, Maitland of Lethington out of diplomatic concerns, which caused a breach in their relationship. Darnley had lost the favour of the Earl of Moray by asserting that he owned too many estates, and his violent outbursts were cracking the veneer of his persona. Darnley had been confined to his bed due to an unusually long spell of the measles, which in view of his later illness, tends to suggest that he may have already suffered from the first signs of syphilis. Mary, blind to this personality change, spent long hours at his bedside in the intimacy of his private chamber. By May 1565, Darnley had made a full recovery.

Darnley and Mary were married in a short Catholic ceremony on 29th July 1565. However, the contractual part of the marriage was probably completed in secret on 9th of the same month. Mary did not wait for the papal dispensation necessary for their marriage as they were related, and when it did arrive, it was luckily backdated so as to validate their union. Mary thus married Darnley hurriedly, bestowing titles upon him and issuing a coin in his honour, building up a group of supporters in the face of mounting opposition from Moray's party, and ignoring Elizabeth's orders. If she had hesitated before, Mary had now made it clear that she was not prepared to be dictated to as to her choice of husband; not by her advisers and relatives, nor by another monarch, nor indeed by the Church itself.

However, by the time the Earl of Moray and his accomplices had fled to England in October 1565 following the crush of their rebellion against Mary, known as the "Chaseabout Raid", the mood had changed. Mary, who had elevated Darnley to virtual King status before they were even married, and conferred upon him more authority than she may have had the right to, began to realise Darnley's true nature. If she had loved him, she now perceived that the feeling was not returned and that she was just the stepping stone to his own advancement. The Crown Matrimonial, which would have allowed Darnley to rule in Scotland should Mary have died childless, was his most cherished goal. In response to Mary curbing his authority or to any offence made to him, Darnley sulked disappearing for days on end either
gallivanting throughout Scotland or frequenting establishments of ill-repute in Edinburgh with a bunch of equally dissolute youths. He did so little to partake in state affairs that a special seal bearing his signature was made to allow the ratifying of legal documents in his absence. Her marriage to Darnley resulted in a loss of support for Mary, and Parliament attendance was at an all time low. The Lennox-Hamilton feud was intense, and without the advice of the exiled Lords, Mary now turned to the Earl of Bothwell, whom she had recalled from exile at the time of the Chaseabout Raid, in view of his deep-rooted hatred of the Earl of Moray. By her side too, was the ill-fated David Riccio, Mary's
Secretary. When Mary fell ill in the autumn of 1565, Darnley was not at her bedside like she had been at his. In early December, Mary journeyed to Linlithgow in a litter. There, she met Darnley and broke what must have been very bad news to him: Mary was pregnant with their child. The birth of this child effectively robbed him of the opportunity of being King himself.

Until then, Darnley's bad behaviour had been limited to frequent drunkenness and inciting others to excessive drinking, neglect of his duties as the Queen's consort, abusive treatment of Mary and reported sexual perversion. The extent of Darnley's cruel nature though was just about to reveal itself with the murder of Rizzio at Holyroodhouse. This event says a lot not only about Darnley's character but also
about the general morality of the Scottish nobility of the time. Understandably, Mary had been keeping Darnley at arm's length, having realised what a mistake she had made in marrying him. She had infuriated him by partly pardoning the Duke of Châtelherault (his rival Hamilton) for his role in the Chaseabout Raid, and by placing too much trust and attention in her Secretary, the Italian David Rizzio, whom Darnley had liked at first. The rest of the exiled nobles were getting impatient in England and did not think much of the way the tide seemed to be turning in favour of the catholics again. Mary remained unapproachable but Darnley on the other hand was an easy target. His greed for the Crown Matrimonial which Mary kept refusing him and the deterioration of their relationship was a fertile ground for planting the seed of discord. And so it came about that the nobles who had disapproved of Darnley's marriage to Mary, and rebelled against them, now signed a bond in which they pledged to help Darnley in obtaining the Crown Matrimonial in exchange for his protection. A suggestion that
David Rizzio had stepped into his shoes whispered in Darnley's ear was all it took to win him to their side. But the level of cruelty inflicted on David and the way it was done was due to Darnley alone. Darnley insisted that David Rizzio be stabbed in the presence of the Queen, in the hope that she would miscarry. As it happened, Mary did not miscarry and Darnley's plot failed.

Darnley did not stab Rizzio himself and the bond made no mention of the murder, but his culpability was no less certain. He held Mary down while the crime was being committed and his dagger was left in Rizzio's body. Mary became a prisoner in her own home and Darnley, intimidated by the Lords began to lose his nerve and to plead with Mary, confessing that he had allowed them to return to Scotland to help him obtain the Crown Matrimonial, but maintaining that he had no idea that they intended to kill Rizzio. Mary then cleverly turned the situation to her advantage and with Darnley's cooperation, managed to escape to Dunbar where Bothwell and Huntly were waiting for them. Darnley, relieved to have saved his own skin and believing that Mary had genuinely forgiven him, made a victorious entry into Edinburgh and proclaimed his innocence in the Rizzio murder. On her return to Edinburgh, Mary reluctantly pardoned Moray, Argyll and Glencairn who were reconciliated with her supporters Bothwell, Huntly and Atholl. Morton, George Douglas, Ker of Fawdonside and Ruthven fled into exile in England but made sure that they sent Mary the bond in which Darnley had fully incriminated himself. There was no going back for Darnley at this point. Mary kept a semblance of normality with Darnley to ensure that he would not prejudice her son's future by not acknowledging him as his son. However, as soon as James was born and that Darnley had made no attempt to deny his paternity, Mary shut him out again by devoting herself to her son. Darnley reverted to what he did best, drinking to excess, frequenting prostitutes, making a show of Mary and absenting himself for days on end. He was even known to swim on his own in the sea and lochs, a form of exercise which was not practised in those days, unless to escape death by drowning. But Darnley was once again about to seal his own fate by playing with fire. His self-inflicted isolation led him to seek his father's understanding, and plotting to regain his lost prestige. Spies in his household reported that his plans included seizing his son and ruling in his place as Regent, or a rebellion supported by England. Letters sent to the major Catholic powers and the Pope show how he was trying to discredit Mary by throwing doubt on her faith. Darnley had become a real problem, and how to solve this problem was the object of the discussion which took place between the Lords coalition and Mary at Craigmillar.

Mary, who had been very ill some time before, was recovering at Craigmillar. During an ambiguous conversation which was reported two years after the event, the Lords suggested "removing" Darnley. Mary was concerned about the effect a divorce would have on the ligitimacy of her son, but declared that nothing should be done to taint her honour. It is generally deduced from those words that she meant
that she knew that the Lords's intention was to assassinate Darnley and that it was fine as long as it could not be traced to her. The most that can be concluded though is that Mary did have foreknowledge of the plot against Darnley. Shortly after, the Lords signed a bond in which they undertook to prevent further harm from being committed by Darnley. On 12 December 1566, James was baptized in a lavish
Catholic ceremony at Stirling Castle which Darnley, although on site, did not attend presumably to avoid the humiliation of being ignored by Elizabeth's representatives, who still refused to recognise him as King. On 24 December, Mary pardoned the remainder of the Rizzio murderers (except for Ker of Fawdonside and George Douglas) allowing them to return to Scotland, as part of the bargain struck at
Craigmillar. Darnley was not going to hang around to face those he had betrayed and took off to Glasgow to see his father. En route he fell ill and it was assumed that he had been poisoned. A later diagnosis however confirmed that he had small pox, which we now know was the later stages of syphilis.

On 9th January 1567, Mary sent her physician to Glasgow to report on Darnley's health. By mid-January, Mary had removed her son from Stirling to the palace of Holyroodhouse, still fearing a plot by Darnley to seize him. The following week she set off for Glasgow to visit Darnley who received her in his sick bed full of repentance for his past behaviour, and pleading that they restore conjugal relations. Mary agreed in principle but on condition that he return to Edinburgh with her. Darnley told her of the rumours he had heard concerning a plot to harm him and refused to be moved to Craigmillar Castle. Mary did not want Darnley at Holyroodhouse for fear of contagion and Darnley, who was still badly disfigured with the disease, did not want to be seen there either. A more salubrious environment was suggested to him, which he accepted. The site in question was the Old Provost's Lodging, south of the Cowgate and just within the city wall. They arrived at Kirk o' Field on the last days of January, and a semblance of the early days of their relationship seems to have revived. Mary furnished the Old Provost's Lodging as comfortably as possible and even stayed in the room below Darnley's a couple of nights. She paid him regular visits entertaining him in the company of some of the Lords, and within a week or so, Darnley was pronounced well enough to leave the following Monday. On the night of 9th February 1567, Mary should have spent the night there but had to return to Holyroodhouse to attend the final rejoicings of her favourite page's wedding. Darnley is reported to have been annoyed at this and Mary gave him her ring until the next day as a token of her commitment to him. In the early hours of the morning, a huge explosion brought the Old Provost's Lodging down. Darnley's body and that of his servant William Taylor were found half-naked in the adjacent orchard, unmarked and lying beside some
puzzling objects: a cloak, a dagger, rope and a chair. This incident which terminated the life of Darnley is one of the most intricate unsolved murder mysteries of all times. Although the full blame was thrown on Bothwell as the chief murderer and later Mary as his accomplice, there is no doubt that several groups of conspirators were involved, each playing a role which was semi-occulted from the rest. Those Lords who had signed the Craigmillar Bond (which later conveniently disappeared) most probably instigated the plot which was then discovered by Bothwell. Mary had Darnley's body embalmed and buried in the Abbey of Holyrood in the royal vault of James V.

(The most detailed discussion of the murder of Lord Darnley can be found in the book by Major-General R. H. Mahon, "The Tragedy of Kirk o' Field".)

[NI5860] Ruled from 1702 to 1714.

[NI5864] Ruled from 1830 to 1837.
NOTES: Acceded 26 Jun 1830; About 1791 he formed a liaison with the Irish actor Dorothea Jordon (1762-1816), by whom he had ten children. In 1818, after he unexpectedly came into the line of succession to the throne, he married a German princess, Adelaide of Saxe-Mainingen (1797-1849), by whom he had two daughters, both of whom died in infancy. Warmhearted and well intentioned but rather eccentric, William had virtually no political judgement. William was succeeded to the British throne by his niece Victoria. The throne of Hanover was inherited by his brother Ernest Augustus.

[NI5869] Ruled from 1714 to 1727.NOTES: Reign: (1714-1727). The first of the Hanoverian Kings; It is said that George knew no English, but recent research shows that he had a limited knowledge of the language. Thoroughly German in tastes and habits, he made periodic lengthy visits to Hanover, which always remained his primary concern, despite his dutiful efforts to attend to his new kingdom's needs. He remained unpopular in Britain, a fact that contributed to Jacobite plots to replace him with James II's son, James Edward Stuart, known as the Old Pretender.

[NI5877] NOTES: Genealogical tables by James Pope Hennessey in "Queen Mary of Teck" show his year of death as 1803.

[NI5885] NOTES: Married twice in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act.

[NI5893] NOTES: Duke of Kent and Strathern, 4th son of George III. Because William IV had no legitimate children, his niece Victoria became heir apparent to the British crown upon his accession in 1830.

[NI5894] Ruled from 1685 to 1688.

[NI5900] NOTES: Reign: 1837-51: One of Queen Victoria's wicked uncles. He lost an eye at the battle of Tournai in 1774. He was involved in several unsavoury scandals including the mysterious murder of his valet Sellis and an alleged incestuous relationship with his sister Princess Sophia, resulting in the birth of a child. He remained a bachelor until 44 when he married his 1st cousin, 37 year old Princess Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. The Princess had already been married twice and had the reputation of being loose.

[NI5919] Ruled from 1761 to 1820.NOTES: George III of Great Britain and Ireland, King of Hanover, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg (r. 1760-1820), who presided over the loss of Britain's American colonies. He was also elector of Hanover (1760-1815) and by decision of the Congress of Vienna, King of Hanover (1815-20). After the dismissal of several ministers who did not satisfy him, the king found a firm supporter in Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford, Prime Minister from 1770 to 1782. Lord North executed the royal policies that provoked the American Revolution. The unsuccessful conclusion of that protracted conflict forced North to resign, and during the government crisis that followed when three cabinets came and went in less than two years. The King himself was almost induced to abdicate. In 1809 the king became blind. As early as 1765 he had suffered an apparent dementia, and in 1788 his derangement recurred to such a degree that a regency bill was passed, but the king
recovered the following year. In 1811 he succumbed hopelessly to this dementia and his son, later George IV, acted as a regent for the rest of his reign.

[NI5925] NOTES: a.k.a.: Prince George; Christened: George Edward Alexander Edmund; Died in an air crash in Scotland when he was serving in the RAF as an air commodore. He was troubled by drug addiction during his youth.

[NI5927] From an e-mail from Donald 01/19/02

I am the grandson of William D. Sweadner of Libertytown. My mother is Linda Sweadner. Your website and history are very interesting. I was born in Libertytown and lived there until 1959. Gareth Sweadner and his brother Mark were playmate cousins of my brother and me. Thanks for all your work and research in finding where we came from.

[NI5938] Samuel LAVERTY(6) was born on 9 Feb 1878. He died in 1915.(7) He has record identification number
3617.(3) He has Ancestral File number 17.(4) Disappeared in Colorado about 1915 and was never heard from again.
Never married and had no children.

[NI5956] Eleanor of Castile

Birth
ABT 1244, Castile
Death
24 NOV 1290, Herdeby, Near Grantham, Lincolnshire
Burial
, Westminster, Abbey, London, England
Father
Ferdinand III, King of Castile

Family: Edward I (Longshanks), King of England

Marriage
OCT 1254, Las Huelgas

1.Eleanor
2.Joan
3.John
4.Henry
5.Julian (Katherine)
6.Joan of Acre
7.Alfonso, Earl of Chester
8.Margaret
9.Berengaria
10.Mary
11.Alice
12.Elizabeth
13.Edward II, King of England
14.Beatrice
15.Blanche

NOTES: Eleanor was only about ten years old when married to the 15 year old Edward of Westminster at Las
Huelgas in 1254. Such child marriages were commonplace in Europe in the Middle Ages and the brides were
usually consigned to their husbands' families to complete ther education. The marriages were not
consummated until the bride reached a suitable age (usually 14 or 15) and in Eleanor's case it seems to have
been 18 or 19.

[NI5962] David CRAIG (3) was born on 12 Jan 1905 in Warren County, Iowa. He died in Jul 1964.(25) He has
record identification number 3851. He has Ancestral File number 53. (4)

He was married to Catherine Adolf ALBEN (daughter of Charles ALBEN and Mary Adolph ALBEN) on 1 Aug
1938. Catherine Adolf ALBEN was born on 23 Dec 1905 in Jeffersonville, Indiana. She has record
identification number 3852. (3) David CRAIG and Catherine Adolf ALBEN had the following children:

127 i. Martha Coy CRAIG was born on 6 Jul 1941 in Akron, Ohio. She has record identification number -
none assigned.

[NI6004] Patsy lived and attended schools in the San Gabriel Valley, California until her Sophmore year, when her mother remarried and they moved to Victorville, California. Patsy stayed at home until her boys were in High School. After that, she worked at various jobs. Eventually retiring as a bookkeeper/office manager of a child care agency.

[NI6005] Note: Telpher was born in Illinois. His Family came to California in 1933. Telpher grew up and graduated from high school in Victorville. He joined the navy just before the end of WWII. He married and moved to Baldwin Park, California and from there to West Covina where he lived for 30 years. He worked for a small machine shop making pipe threading machines. He retired in December 1989 and moved to Bishop, California.

[NI6023] Karen Lee KITCHEL was born on 13 Feb 1936 in Oakland, Calif.. She has record identification number 2259.

She was married to Joseph Wilbur LINCOLN on 25 Apr 1953. Joseph Wilbur LINCOLN was born on 9 Jun 1932 in
Oakland, Calif.. He died on 18 Jun 1989 in California.(3) He has record identification number 4136.(3) Karen Lee
KITCHEL and Joseph Wilbur LINCOLN had the following children:

+275 i. Joseph Patrick LINCOLN.
276 ii. Patricia Jo LINCOLN was born on 25 Feb 1955 in Oakland, Calif.. She has record identification number
4327.(3)
+277 iii. Garilynn LINCOLN.
278 iv. Ruthlee LINCOLN was born on 8 Apr 1959 in Concord, Calif.. She has record identification number
4329.(3)
279 v. Juliann LINCOLN was born on 17 Jun 1960 in Walnut Creek, Calif.. She has record identification
number 4330.(3)
280 vi. Leslie Leigh LINCOLN was born on 11 Oct 1964 in Concord, Calif.. She has record identification
number 4756.(3)

[NI6038] Nellie Lee ATCHISON was born on 6 Nov 1876 in Polk Co., Iowa. She died in Feb 1981 in Woodburn,
Oregon.(25) She has record identification number 3639.(3)

She was married to Alonzo S. ROACH (son of James H. ROACH and Elizabeth ROACH) on 10 Oct 1900 in Grayrocks,
Wyoming. Alonzo S. ROACH(44) was born on 18 Jul 1871 in Delaware. He died on 12 Dec 1960 in Rawlings, Wyo.
He has record identification number 3640.(3) He ranched and operated a store at Wheatland and was State
enforcement officer and sheriff of Platte Coonty, Wyoming, and later for fourteen years was Warden of the Wyoming
penitentiary at Rawlings Nellie Lee ATCHISON and Alonzo S. ROACH had the following children:

119 i. Helen Sumner ROACH was born on 27 Feb 1902. She died on 30 May 1954. She has record
identification number - none assigned.
120 ii. Francis Myrtle ROACH was born on 31 Oct 1903. She has record identification number - none
assigned.
121 iii. Mabel Davis ROACH was born on 10 Mar 1907. She has record identification number - none assigned.

[NI6063] Submitted by Lisa Johnson, SD

Arthur never married.

[NI6067] SSN # 562-09-0239

The Life Story of Paul Harner Swadener (as told to Patsy Swadener-Adams)

Paul Harner Swadener was born on the 30th day of December, 1904, Dayton, Ohio. The fifth child and only son of George Halleck Swadener and Birdella Maud Harner-Swadener.

Paul's mother died when he was six years of age and his only memory of her is being in the kitchen where there was and old coal stove and a place to hang clothes. His mother gave him three pennies to get him to go to school.

Birdella wa sick a long time with TB and her husband George fixed up a little screen-in-room on the second story where she could get lots of fresh air.

Paul was the best fighter on the block. He always liked to fight with Buster Blakely and they took turns winning. Paul attended the Allen Street School in Dayton. It was a red brick building with many class rooms. Paul started in Kindergarden when he was four years old, which made it difficult as he he grew older. He liked school about as well as any kid and was about a B student.

During his freshman year he quit school and began working in a screw machine factory. Paul oiled the machines and got his clothing pretty dirty and so his father (George) found out about his quitting school and made him return to school. Paul then ran away from home and lived with a friend whose parents did not know he was a runaway. Paul found a job in an evevlope factory and worked there for a while.

Paul's father (George) discovered where he was working and brought him home, but decided to let him go on working. Paul wanted to go to California (he had a sister in Highland Park), so he sold his bike for $25.00, collected his pay check and bought a ticket to California. After he bought the ticket he had $18.00 to travel on. It took him about a week to reach California.

Paul was broke when he arrived in Los Angles (year 1912), he had his mechanical drawing set with him and pawned it for $5.00. He rented a room for three or four days, until he found a woman named Mrs. Watts, his sister's mother-in-law.

Paul told me he wasn't scared at all, his dad always left him on his own and jobs were easy for young people to find. He stayed with the Watts family for a year or so and worked in a laundry. The Watts moved to East Los Angles and Paul moved into a trailor park near Greelys Drug Store on Garvey Blvd, near San Gabriel Blvd., Wilmar, California. This drug store existed in 1940's

It wan't too long after that when Paul moved in with the Crawfords and went to work for the Southern Pacific Railroad. Roland Crawford was Paul's best friend.

An ex-two-gun man of the old west was staying at the Crawford ranch, he was quite crippled up and 73 years of age. He tried to shut off a gasoline lamp, but it didn't turn off tight and when it didn't go off he turned it back up and evidently broke the pressure valve. Paul went to shut it off and the vapor came shooting out and sprayed all over him (Paul). Then the fire ignited the gasoline and set Paul's clothes on fire. He tired to take off the close fitting coveralls and when that wasn't successful he rolled on the floor. Roland began to wonder where he was and found him. Roland grabbed a blanket and smoothered the flam. Roland rushed him to the hospital where the doctors were sure he would not live and they left him lay and didn't do anything for the burn.

It burnt his armpit and left side and under arm above the waist. A piece of skin grew across from his arm to his side in the area of the armpit, so that he was crippled in that area for two or three years.

A fellow that lived at the ranch went to sell a car to a doctor Stewart, who was being visited by another doctor. This fellow, after a short conversation, told them about Paul being burnt by Gibby's dad. The doctor then said, "he was once in partnership with this Jack Gibbson and he's like to have a look at Paul."

Paul payed him $300.00 for a $1,500.00 operation, which gave him almost complete use of his arm. They cut a complete new armpit, removing all the sweat glands, etc. Paul worked for Whitcombs in Monterey Park and later went to work for Bishop Cooky and Cracker Company driving truck.

Margaret Jane Whiteford married Paul in 1929. They lived in Wilmar and Patsy Jane was born to them on September 29, 1930 at the Vorbeck Maternity Home in Monterey Park. They lived in San Bernardino for two years, they then returned to Wilmar. They had a son Ernie Paul in November 1933. Ernie Paul went to live with Margaret's sister Billie Reed and Ernie Reed.

Paul drove truck and had his own route for Bishop Cooky Company in San Bernardino, California. He had a good route and built it up, but a new company started up in the area and offered him more money if he would come with them, which he did and they went broke, so he moved back to Wilmar and lived with friends for a short time. I believe he went to work for Hormel Meat Company for about six ro eight years.

Nancy Ann was born to them January 1936. She was a sixth month baby and was held in the birth canal too long, she was born dead. The worked on her and brought her to life. She had cerebralpalsy, effecting her left side.

In 1941 Paul went to Las Vegas, Nevada on a government war job. Then he went to Hawaii as part of a construction crew to rebuild Pearl Harbor. He was gone for about two years and while he was in Oahu his stepson, Robert Martin Sturdivant was brought in wounded and Paul was able to see him and let the family know how he was doing.

Peggy (Margaret Whiteford) and Paul did not always get along and had split up several times. Patsy and Ernie Paul had lived with their Aunt Billie and Uncle Ernie Reed at different times, and Ernie Paul continued to live with the Reeds throughout his life.

Peggy sold the home on Gladys Avenue while Paul was out of the country and bought a home on Falling Leaf in Garvey. Peggy and Paul never got together and were divorced in 1945. They sold the house on falling Leaf and Paul moved to Los Angles and Peggy remarried and moved to Victorville, California. Paul went to work for Pabst Brewery and stayed there twenty years. He married Maureen Gant who was very good to him the rest of his life.

Paul died December 5, 1967 and was buried at Rose Hills Memorial Park. He had emphysema and cirrhosis of the liver, he was a heavy drinker all of his adult life, (he was an alcoholic.) He died in the hospital. (He never allowed liquor to interfer with work.)

Things I remember:

Daddy was soft spoken - always a hard worker - he liked to live fast and hard - he used to race motor cycles on Garvey Blvd. in the
City of Monterey Park. He built our house in San Gabriel. Before he got burnt, he was boxing and hoping to compete in the Golden Gloves Tournament.

He always told us he was a Swede and I never knew he was German until I started doing Genealogy. He was born late in his parents life and his mother was never well after his birth. I was told his father never forgave him. Men were very hard on their children in those days. My grandfather sold the old farm approximatley 1938 and sent my mother a check for my dad's share. My grandfather always sent me cards and wanted my mother to let me come to Ohio to see him, but I was too young. My grandfather went to the Old Soldiers Home in Washington DC, where (he) lived out his life.